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Funded Projects Query Form
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Grant program: Common Heritage
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Rhode Island Latino Arts (Providence, RI 02907-1353)
Marta V. Martinez (Project Director: May 2018 to October 2021)
Marta V. Martinez (Project Director: October 2021 to December 2021)

PY-263641-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Nuestras Raíces: Community Pláticas & Story Gatherings

Three digitization events to collect local history materials and a series of complementary public programs (pláticas or talks) focused on the Latino community in Rhode Island.  The events would be managed by Rhode Island Latino Arts (RILA), a community-based organization that has been collecting oral histories in the state since 1991, many of which are available online through support from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities.  The proposed project would support a collaboration between RILA and the Providence Preservation Society, faculty and students at Roger Williams University, two public libraries, and one social services agency to document the history, language, and heritage of Rhode Island Latinos through the digitization of documents, such as photographs, personal papers, business documents (menus, business cards, and brochures), and objects, such as woven spools of yarn.  With donor permission, the digitized materials would be used to create a visual complement to RILA’s oral histories through, among other projects, an expansion of a photo mural project featuring Rhode Island Latino history on bus shelters in Providence.

To collect, document and preserve RI Latino history through community conversations and the arts. The first Community Archive on Latino History will be created, indexed and made accessible to the public.

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Butte, MT 59701-9206)
Ellen Crain (Project Director: May 2018 to December 2021)

PY-263659-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

All Nations: Preserving the Ethnic Heritage of Butte, Montana

Four, two-day digitization workshops to collect local history materials from the Hispanic, German, Finnish, and Jewish communities of Butte, Montana.  The city has invested in the Butte-Silver Bow (BSB) Public Archives, since the public voted in favor of a $7.5 million bond issue to improve, expand, and modernize its archives in 2007.  The archives hosts a series of “All Nations” exhibits to honor the ethnic communities that have shaped the city’s history since its founding as a mining camp in the 1860s.  In partnership with the Montana Preservation Alliance, the workshops would combine digitization of cultural heritage materials with oral history collection and public programming, to include presentations by a local author and faculty from the University of Montana, Rocky Mountain College, and Montana State University.  The “All Nations” digital collection would be made available for research on the BSB Public Archives website.

All Nations: Preserving the Ethnic Heritage of Butte, Montana is a project to preserve and celebrate the heritage of ethnic communities that are important within the culture of the city's rich history. This grant will support staff of the Butte-Silver Bow Public Archives and the Montana Preservation Alliance to conduct outreach with the last four communities to join the project -- the Hispanic, German, Finnish and Jewish communities of the city. The Archives and MPA will lead a digitization workshop with each community to capture and preserve significant elements of their material culture. Work with all communities will result in digitized files of documents, artifacts, artwork, recordings and historic places materials that will be added to the widely accessible collections of Butte Silver Bow Public Archives, and serve as the basis for a 10-week exhibit on each community that draws people of the community together, and celebrates and promotes broader understandings of their heritage.

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Michelle Kumata (Project Director: May 2018 to January 2019)
Jessica A. Rubenacker (Project Director: January 2019 to February 2022)

PY-263660-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,918 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

Stories Across Generations: Pacific Islander Americans in Western Washington

One digitization day, as well as three pop-up exhibits and accompanying public programs to feature oral histories and digitized cultural heritage materials from the Pacific Islander American community in the greater Seattle and King County metro area.  Washington state is home to the third largest Pacific Islander (PI) community in the nation, including 70,000 Native Hawaiians, Samoans, Guamanians, Tongans, Marshallese, and 15 other ethnic groups.  The project represents a collaboration between The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience (The Wing) and several PI community organizations, including the United Territories of Pacific Islander Alliance (Seattle and Portland chapters) and the Pacific Islander Student Commission at the University of Washington.  PI undergraduate students would be trained in oral history collection and would assist the museum’s collections manager during the digitization day to be hosted at Highline College.  With donor permission, the digitized materials would be made available through the museum’s website.  The Wing would build upon their past success documenting the Burmese American community with a previous Common Heritage award.

The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience (The Wing) in partnership with the Pacific Islander American (PI) community in Western Washington respectfully request $12,000 to digitize and preserve this underrepresented community’s heritage. Public knowledge about PI Americans is grossly limited due to decades of racism and discrimination as well as lack of local institutions to preserve heritage materials. Furthermore young PI Americans’ knowledge about their own heritage is limited. A series of events involving young adults in collecting oral histories, digitizing local objects of PI American heritage, and presentations about importance heritage collections will help young adults connect with their histories, will affirm the importance of heritage and culture for PI community members, will make the general public more knowledgeable about the PI population, and will be integrated into the collections and exhibitions of The Wing, to continue to support this community.

University of the South (Sewanee, TN 37383-2000)
William Woody Register (Project Director: May 2018 to March 2022)

PY-263663-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Restore, Remember and Rebuild the St. Mark’s Community

Two “History Matters” events aimed at recovering, preserving, and making public the contributions of St. Mark’s, a historically African American community in Sewanee, Tennessee, changed and dispersed by racial integration.  In addition to digitizing photographs, family Bibles, oral histories, and other items from this under-represented community, proposed events would include presentations by experts in African American history and the Community Driven Archives Team at the University of North Carolina’s Southern Historical Collection.  Collected images and voice recordings would be made available to the public in an online exhibit managed by Sewanee’s Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation.

The University of the South will work with an African American community radically transformed during the racial integration of the 1960s, when loss of public institutions and lack of opportunity led to a diaspora. We will host community events inviting remaining residents and former residents to bring evidence of personal history (Bibles, photos and other objects) to be scanned and photographed using the “post-custodial model” of data collection. We will have oral history stations and will engage in community mapping to locate abandoned home sites using LiDAR images. Programming includes presentations on similar projects organized by the Community-Driven Archives Team of the University of North Carolina Southern Historical Collection and a “Places Project” conducted by a Mellon post-doctoral fellow. Central to the project is an online exhibit created to restore memory of the community and raising public acknowledgement of African Americans’ work to build it and the University.

Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History (Chapel Hill, NC 27516-2303)
Della Pollock (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

PY-263665-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,697 (approved)
$10,697 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2020

Teachers, Artisans, and Entrepreneurs: Black Community and Work in a Southern Town

A community archives digitization day documenting work, trade, and mutual care in the historically black Northside neighborhood of Chapel Hill, and outreach programming including discussions of public history and curation.  The applicant would partner with the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center and the Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina for a “history harvest” to scan and photograph materials, gather metadata, and record stories about the items.  With donor permission, digital items would be processed and made publicly available through an Omeka-based online digital archive.

Teachers, Artisans, and Entrepreneurs: Black Community and Work in a Southern Town (January 2019 to June 2020) will recognize the ingenuity necessary to creating and sustaining a thriving economy in the historically Black community known as Northside, in Chapel Hill, NC. Initially a labor enclave attached to a public university, Northside is both unique and exemplary in its history of interconnected byways of work, labor, and economy. Through the digitization of documents that reflect the full spectrum of community life, this project will preserve and advance the legacy of work in Northside. The documents will be shared at a public event through themed visual exhibits coupled with listening stations, interpretive commentary by scholars, and story circles. These events will help us to understand more about sub-economies, desegregation, and the connections between business, school, church, and family that have long distinguished Northside and similar communities across the U.S.

San Francisco State University (San Francisco, CA 94132-1722)
Persis M. Karim (Project Director: May 2018 to February 2022)

PY-263667-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

We are Here: Building a Digital Archive for the San Francisco Bay Area Iranian-American Community

One digitization event and two public programs focused on the history of California’s Iranian American community, the largest population of Iranians living outside of Iran.  The project would be managed by the Center for Iranian Diaspora Studies at San Francisco State University (SFSU) in collaboration with SFSU Library and community organizations, such as the Diaspora Arts Connection and the Persian Center.  SFSU is home to a number of resources and complementary collections, including the College of Ethnic Studies, the Bay Area Television Archive, and the Sutro Library of the California State Library, which contains thousands of family histories from earlier California immigrants.  With donor permission, the digitized cultural heritage materials from this event would be made available through an Omeka-based exhibit on the Center’s website.  Public programs would feature presentations on the importance of family histories in public archives by Mattie Taormina, Director of the Sutro Library, and another by the Center’s director, Dr. Persis Karim, for the Iranian American community.

“We are Here: Building a Digital Archive for the San Francisco Bay Area Iranian-American Community” fills a gap in the history of California and Bay Area immigration history by documenting the untold stories of Iranian Americans who have for decades been overshadowed by negative news headlines that have obscured their human stories. Community members will scan original materials, help create metadata, and be interviewed about their stories at a digitization event at San Francisco State University in May 2019; this material will become part of a public history archive that preserves and share documents, photographs, letters, etc., on the website of the San Francisco State University Center for Iranian Diaspora Studies. Programs leading up to the “digitization day” include a presentation about family narratives as part of California history and another that highlights oral histories and digital storytelling for academic research and public history.

San Diego History Center (San Diego, CA 92101-1664)
Mari Tina Zarpour (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

PY-263669-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

Border Dwellers/Los de la Frontera

Digitization events to collect local history materials in two communities in the South Bay region of the San Diego metropolitan area, Old Town National City and San Ysidro.  A majority of residents are of Spanish-speaking descent, many with family roots in the area dating before the 1848 border demarcation.  Photo archivists at the San Diego Historical Society would lead the events in collaboration with two social services agencies, Casa de Salud/Old Town National City Committee in National City and Casa Familiar/The Front Art Gallery in San Ysidro.  The events would feature workshops on preserving family memorabilia and be followed by presentations based on the digitized images by a local historian and author, Barbara Zagora.  With donor permission, the materials would be made available on the website of the San Diego Historical Society, the Online Archive of California/Calisphere, and the Digital Public Library of America.

Border Dwellers/Los de la Frontera will examine the border community of the South Bay, San Diego County’s. The San Diego-Tijuana international border is unique historically, culturally, and sociologically than other border locales, and yet the history of this region has yet to be explored. This project, the first of its kind in the South Bay, represents a critical first step in the recognition of the cultural heritage of its border residents. The San Diego History Center plans to focus on the cultural heritage of two South Bay communities: San Ysidro and Old Town National City. The digitization event and surrounding programs will collect family photographs, portraits, and documents like letters, military papers, and ephemera. A follow-up event will consist of a slideshow and history lecture presented by a historian based on the items digitized from the participants, and a discussion session for attendees to share memories. SDHC staff will be present to record these memories.

Bowling Green State University (Bowling Green, OH 43403-0001)
Michelle Sweetser (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

PY-263670-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

Preserving and Contextualizing the Islamic Culture and Heritage of Northwest Ohio.

One digitization event and two public exhibits and programs focused on the history of Northwest Ohio’s Muslim community.  The proposed project represents a partnership between the Center for Archival Collections (CAC), which is a unit of the Bowling Green State University (BSGU) Libraries, and the Islamic Center for Greater Toledo (ICGT), which was founded in 1954 and represents the first community to build a mosque in Ohio and the third in the nation.  BGSU archivists and students would assist with digitization, and ICGT volunteers would assist with translating information about the historical items brought in by community members, which are likely to include personal documents and family artifacts in Arabic, Farsi, Kurdish, Urdu, Hindi, and Bengali.  With donor permission, materials would be featured in an Omeka-based digital exhibit and made available for research in the Digital Public Library of America through CAC’s participation in the Ohio Digital Network.

The Center for Archival Collections (CAC) and the Islamic Center of Greater Toledo (ICGT) will host a community scanning day and two public exhibits and programs focusing on the history of Northwest Ohio’s Muslim community, as well as the role of the ICGT within that history. Members of the ICGT and general public will be invited to bring any historical materials related to the project theme for reformatting and preservation by the CAC. The scanning day will present a significant opportunity for initiating the preservation of the region’s Islamic heritage, which has been anchored by the ICGT and the religious, educational and cultural programs offered to both its members as well as the greater Toledo community. Subsequent public programs and exhibits will allow the community at large - Muslim and non-Muslim - to learn about and engage with Islamic traditions and culture, and to better appreciate the significant role that Muslims and the ICGT have played in the history of the region.

Northeastern Oklahoma State University (Tahlequah, OK 74464-2301)
Brenda Kay Bradford (Project Director: May 2018 to January 2024)

PY-263674-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,957 (approved)
$10,996 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 2/29/2020

Paving the Way: Green Country’s Cultural and Historical Preservation Initiative

A two-day digitization event to be held during the fall 2019 Northeastern State University (NSU) Homecoming weekend to document the history of Tahlequah and its surrounding communities.  The project would solicit materials relating to the settlement of the area after the Trail of Tears and the establishment of the Cherokee Male and Female Seminaries.  Built in 1889, Seminary Hall on NSU’s campus was originally the Cherokee National Female Seminary.  The proposed project would bring together several university divisions, including the library’s Special Collections and Archives, the Center for Tribal Studies and American Indian Heritage Committee, the Native American Support Center, and the Alumni Association, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Department of Libraries, the Cherokee Heritage Center, the Cherokee Capital Chapter/National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, the Oklahoma Historical Society, and the Indian Territory Genealogical and Historical Society.  Programs for the public would include two local history lectures and preservation workshops focused on family artifacts and disaster response.  With donor permission, digitized items would be preserved at the NSU Special Collections and Archives.

Tahlequah, OK is one of the most historically significant cities west of the Mississippi River as it was the final stop for displaced Native Americans at the end of the forced Indian removals commonly known as the Trail of Tears. The vast array of rich Indigenous cultural and regional artifacts within the surrounding communities is indicative of a unique culture and are one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable. Working in partnership with cultural and historical organizations to create an atmosphere of community awareness, provide publicly accessible preservation presentations, and provide complementary digital preservation of regionally historically significant materials and memorabilia is a proactive undertaking towards preservation concerns and public accessibility to the materials. The vast array of cultural material that remains in the homes of community members would aid in the preservation of historically significant materials, allowing for these objects to be accessed by everyone.

Salisbury University (Salisbury, MD 21801-6860)
Creston Long (Project Director: May 2018 to October 2022)

PY-263676-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,313 (approved)
$10,978 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Delmarva Baseball: Digitizing the Heritage of 20th-Century Eastern Shore Baseball Leagues

From the early 1920s through the 1970s, residents of Delmarva (Delaware and the Eastern Shore counties of Maryland and Virginia) enjoyed attending games played by town teams that competed in the semi-professional Eastern Shore baseball leagues. Reflecting the broader segregation in American society, white players competed in the Eastern Shore and Central Shore leagues and African American players competed in the Negro League. Towns and communities on the peninsula built stadiums, sponsored teams, and paid players to compete in seasons that ran from spring through the late summer. Baseball on Delmarva was an integral part of cultural and social life in the region during this time. The Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture at Salisbury University will host a series of events in 2019 and 2020 to promote awareness of this rich history and to archive digital images of documents, photographs, and memorabilia connected to Delmarva baseball.

Georgia College and State University (Milledgeville, GA 31061-3375)
Shaundra Walker (Project Director: May 2018 to August 2022)

PY-263696-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$9,283 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 12/31/2021

Documenting Milledgeville's African American History

This project will expand the community’s cultural heritage by digitizing materials documenting the area’s African American history. The opportunity to highlight the community’s lived experience capitalizes upon existing community-led/involved efforts on this topic. Community members will receive training in caring and preserving their cultural heritage materials and will have their materials scanned for their own personal use. If elected, their materials will be included in local, regional and national digital repositories. Selected items will be featured in a traveling exhibit that will visit several sites of cultural significance. A humanities scholar will lead a lecture that will use the history of a historic community school to engage participants in a discussion of the history of the community. Community griots will also speak briefly at the lecture. By focusing on several areas of cultural significance, this project will leverage the community’s pride in their stories.

Clemson University (Clemson, SC 29634-0001)
Rhondda Robinson Thomas (Project Director: May 2018 to November 2021)

PY-263730-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,165 (approved)
$10,746 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 5/31/2021

Call My Name: Digitizing African American Heritage in the Greater Clemson, South Carolina Community

A two-day digitization event to collect materials regarding the under-documented contributions and stories of African Americans at Clemson University and from the surrounding community.  In collaboration with local community partners, the applicant would add digitized items to an existing Call My Name community digitization project created in 2014.  The proposed events would incorporate a community stage featuring music, dance, oral history collection, and presentations.  With donor permission, digital objects would be made publicly available on the web site and the South Carolina Digital Archive.

Through Call my Name, a community outreach project I created in 2014, I have collaborated with three local community partners—the Bertha Lee Strickland Cultural Museum in Seneca, SC, the Clemson Area African American Museum, and the Pendleton Foundation for Black History and Culture—to find, document, and preserve the African-American cultural heritage of Clemson University, which was built by convicts on the former Fort Hill Plantation of proslavery American statesman John C. Calhoun in Upstate South Carolina in the early 1890s, and the towns that developed around the higher education institution. I apply for a Common Heritage grant to support the digitization of African American material history that is collected during a two-day Black History Month event in February 2020 for use on the Call My Name website and the Documenting the Clemson African American Experience collection in the South Carolina Digital Archive, and to offer preservation support to the owners of the material.

Seneca Nation of Indians (Salamanca, NY 14779-0231)
David George-Shongo (Project Director: May 2018 to March 2020)
Joe Stahlman (Project Director: March 2020 to present)

PY-263731-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,931 (approved)
$11,931 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

Pathways to Sovereignty

Digitization of cultural heritage materials at annual community events, such as the New York State Fair, the Grand River and Akwesasne powwows, and local community gatherings, as well as a public exhibit of the collected images and a lecture on Haudenosaunee history at the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum.  The Haudenosaunee, also known as the Iroquois Confederacy, are a union of six distinct nations across upper New York State: the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora.  The project would build upon a past Common Heritage award  to the Seneca by extending the museum’s reach to affiliated tribes and allowing the staff to share their experience in community documentation efforts with them.  Cornell Professor Jolene Rickard would present the history of Haudenosaunee diplomacy and protection of sovereignty at a museum lecture to complement the photo exhibit of contemporary Haudenosaunee culture.

The Seneca-Iroquois National Museum will focus their collections on the history of resistance and exercise of sovereignty by the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy)

Museum of Chinese in America (New York, NY 10013-3601)
Yue Ma (Project Director: May 2018 to October 2022)
Melissa Wansin Wong (Co Project Director: March 2020 to March 2020)

PY-263754-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Our Family Treasures

A day-long digitization event to document the personal and family histories of the  Chinese American community, focusing on records and ephemera from family and professional associations, churches, and Chinese schools.  Preservation workshops for the public would be featured at the digitization event, as well as periodically throughout the year on such topics as photograph preservation, textile and object preservation, and training in how to record and save family stories.  Museum staff would also host a subsequent open house with tours of the archives and a “Letters Alive!” program, which would feature readings (in Mandarin and English) of historical letters from the archives written to Chinese American immigrants by their loved ones in China.  With donor permission, digitized materials would be made available for research at the museum’s archives and on the website.  The project would build upon an earlier Common Heritage award by expanding the museum’s outreach efforts in New York City, home to the largest Chinese population of any city outside of Asia.

The Museum of Chinese in America seeks a $12,000 grant from NEH to support Our Family Treasures. This program series aims to preserve, digitize and showcase Chinese-American family and community history and culture. The series consists of: one day-long Our Family Treasures preservation & digital archiving program; four to five how-to workshops led by professional archivists on preserving heritage materials; and monthly one-on-one digitization and consultation sessions with the Museum’s Collections staff. Working on the premise that American history and experience is shaped by the material culture and memories of those who interact intimately with them over time, Our Family Treasures spotlights the untold stories and living histories of immigrant communities in New York City and their heirlooms—objects, photos, paper documents, business and association paraphernalia, and other ephemera of familial and cultural importance—a goal that has been central to MOCA's mission since our founding.

Bcworkshop (Dallas, TX 75201-5504)
Lizzie MacWillie (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

PY-263756-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 11/30/2020

Southern Dallas Neighborhood Stories: Preserving the Undertold Histories of Communities of Color

Three digitization days to collect family memorabilia and oral histories that explore how urban renewal and school desegregation impacted Dallas’s communities of color in specific neighborhoods, including historically African-American communities in former Freedmen’s Towns—Short North Dallas (now Uptown and Deep Ellum), Joppa, Elm Thicket (North Park), Little Egypt, Queen City, and Tenth Street, as well as historically Mexican-American communities like La Bajada, Los Altos, La Loma, and the former Little Mexico.  The materials would be used in subsequent exhibits and programs at three branches of the Dallas Public Library and be accompanied by a short film compiled from the oral histories recorded.  Panels discussing the historical significance of the exhibit items would include members from community groups, such as the African American Genealogical Interest Group and the Dallas Mexican-American Historical League.  With donor permission, the digitized materials would be made available for research at the Dallas Public Library by the Dallas History and Archives Division.

buildingcommunityWORKSHOP will partner with the Dallas Public Library to mount digitization events and exhibitions at three library branches in Dallas’s southern sector. Many neighborhoods in the southern sector face challenges such as blight, vacancy, and deterioration. Yet, these communities also possess rich cultural histories that often go untold in traditional narratives. During the mid-20th century, the city of Dallas experienced many changes in its built and cultural form; the design and planning decisions that underlied these changes often had disproportionate impacts on communities of color. These stories often are only preserved in the minds and personal artifacts of residents. Through this new digitization and oral history filming project, which will result in three exhibitions and three short films, residents and stakeholders alike will gain a greater understanding of how physical and cultural changes have left a legacy that is still evident in the inequities we see today.

University of Mississippi Medical Center (Jackson, MS 39216-4505)
Amy Wiese Forbes (Project Director: May 2018 to May 2021)

PY-263758-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,993 (approved)
$7,782 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Finding Community: Documenting Descendants of Mississippi State Lunatic Asylum Patients in History and Cultural Memory

Two community collection days to digitize materials and collect oral histories related to the Mississippi State Insane Asylum, which was located on the site of the University of Mississippi Medical College (UMMC) from 1855 to 1935.  After a University construction crew discovered coffins from the Asylum’s cemetery in 2012, many descendants contacted news sites and the university to request details and offer information.  The proposed events would seek to reach and unite the interested members of the descendant community and provide information about collective identity and history through family stories, historical context, and analysis.  History students from Jackson State University and Millsaps College would assist in collecting contextual information, and, with donor permission, digitized items would be made available via the UMMC library’s digital archive.

This project explores family and cultural memory of the Mississippi State Insane Asylum (1855 to 1935) descendant community by gathering, documenting and providing access to untold histories of family involvement with the Asylum and what that involvement has meant to descendants. It is significant to community members because it will preserve previously undocumented historical materials related to the Asylum, bring the Asylum descendant community together as co-authors of the Asylum’s history, collect evidence of the Asylum’s place in the community’s cultural memory, share information with the community about the Asylum’s history that is currently known, and educate the descendant community about the importance of preserving its past and how to do it. It includes 2 days of digitization, oral history, public exhibition of donated materials, preservation seminars, discussions of Asylum history, cultural memory and ethics, and descendant community input for future programs.

Southern Nevada Public Television (Las Vegas, NV 89121-4427)
Niki Bates (Project Director: May 2018 to October 2022)

PY-263760-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Building Las Vegas - Understanding and Preserving Las Vegas's Unique Heritage

Two digitization events to collect Las Vegas residents’ photographs and memories from the 1960s to the 1990s, a period in which the city experienced a nearly 300 percent increase in population.  The project would be managed by Vegas PBS in collaboration with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries’ Special Collections and Archives unit and the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s Springs Preserve, a 180-acre cultural institution featuring museums, galleries, and a botanical garden.  One event, hosted during a popular “community free day” at Springs Preserve, would solicit original photographs, slides, and negatives from the public, as well as offer presentations by a UNLV Libraries curator and a local historian.  With donor permission, the personal photographs would be made available through the UNLV Libraries’ digital portal and would complement their existing holdings from architects and developers on the city’s growth.

Las Vegas stands as a prominent national example of an expansive and expanding planned community void of any common heritage. Vegas PBS, UNLV University Libraries, and the Las Vegas Valley Water District will collaborate on Building Las Vegas. This project will engage community members in collections/digitization events, public programs, and public access collections. In addition to digital collections, this collaboration will also capture video stories and continue public access beyond the events via physical exhibits, digital collection portals, and public service media platforms. The intent of this project is to provide community members with greater context and a better understanding of how Las Vegas’s unique history, environment, and growth helps to shape our own equally unique social and cultural identity. The project timeline is from January 2019 to April 2020.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Mary Corbin Sies (Project Director: May 2018 to present)

PY-263763-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2021

Change and Resilience in Lakeland: African Americans in College Park, MD 1950-1980

A day-long digitization event, by-appointment collecting visits to neighbors’ homes, and a public interpretation event to document and explore the history of Lakeland, an African American community in Prince George's County, Maryland.  The proposed project would build upon an existing collaboration between the Lakeland Community Heritage Project (LCHP), which is Lakeland’s volunteer-run historical society, and the American Studies Department and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park.  The project seeks to deepen understanding of the impact of desegregation and urban renewal as experienced by Lakelanders through their own keepsakes and historical documents.  Professor Sies, the project director, is an expert in suburban community studies, and with the LCHP, she co-developed the Lakeland Digital Archive, to which the new materials would be added and made publicly available.

Lakeland (1890) was central among a group of historic African American communities from Prince George’s County, MD. Between 1950-1980, Lakeland experienced upheaval and change, particularly a contentious school desegregation process, urban renewal, and subsequent dispersal of residents. The grant will fund two kinds of collecting activities and a public interpretation event. A daylong event will invite Lakeland residents to bring items from this period to be digitized: images, letters, personal papers, artifacts, scrapbooks, and the like, followed by educational workshops about the importance of and best practices for preserving materials about their heritage. Team members will also visit households with a portable archival kit to digitize and preserve their papers. Later, the team and humanities consultants will present an interpretive program on the newly collected archival materials and moderate a community conversation about the changes Lakeland experienced between 1950-80.

Firelight Media, Inc. (New York, NY 10031-6300)
Marcia Smith (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

PY-263764-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Apalachicola Black Archive Project

The Apalachicola Black Archive Project will digitize submissions of heritage materials from individuals and organizations in the unique and historic Florida panhandle city of Apalachicola. The Project will host a 2-day collection event and public program on May 18-19, 2019 (May 20 is when many black Floridians celebrate Emancipation Day). Longstanding resident families, historic churches, members of fraternal organizations and their descendants will form the primary targets for contributing photographs, papers, programs, and other documents related to the history of the African American community of Apalachicola. The Project is led by Marcia Smith, President of Firelight Media, in collaboration with Jill Rourke, Director of the Apalachicola Margaret Key Library, in collaboration with local organizations including the Hillside Coalition of Laborers of Apalachicola and the African American Art, History and Culture Association and others.

Bainbridge Island Historical Museum (Bainbridge Island, WA 98110-1855)
Brianna Rossettie Kosowitz (Project Director: June 2018 to present)

PY-263775-19
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,176 (approved)
$11,176 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2019 – 6/30/2020

Boats, Berries and Big Trees: Preserving the History of Bainbridge Island

Two day-long digitization events to document Bainbridge Island’s family histories through photographs, letters, journals and diaries, newspaper articles, employment records, signs and posters, and other two-dimensional artifacts.  Volunteers would record brief oral histories that relate to the artifacts themselves, putting them into a familial or community context.  A partnership between the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum and Kitsap Regional Library, Bainbridge Island Branch, the project would offer the community an exhibit and three public lectures featuring the items brought in for digitization, organized around the themes of maritime history, logging and sawmills, and the Island’s agricultural heritage.  The project would seek participation among minority groups, such as Native Americans, Filipino Americans, and Japanese Americans, whose history on the island is inextricably linked to the region’s economic development.  With donor permission, the materials would be preserved at the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum.

This project will explore the opportunities that drew immigrants to Bainbridge Island, WA, and thereby came to define its cultural heritage: shipbuilding, the lumber industry, and strawberry farming. Community members with a family tradition of these activities will bring photographs, letters, journals and other artifacts to be digitized at two full-day events at Bainbridge Island Public Library (BPL). Participants will receive a digital copy of their materials on USB drives, and will be invited to record brief narratives relating the significance of the material to their families. With the consent of owners, digitized material will be accessioned into the permanent collection of Bainbridge Island Historical Museum (BIHM), with transcribed narratives incorporated into metadata. After the event, BIHM will create a temporary exhibit of digitized artifacts at PBL and offer a series of public lectures exploring themes including transnationalism, multiculturalism and boom/bust economies.

Florida Gulf Coast University (Fort Myers, FL 33965-6565)
Clay Motley (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258570-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$8,760 (approved)
$7,141 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Beyond the Blues: Discovering and Preserving Clarksdale Mississippi's History

A week-long community digitization event and a public program to document the history of Clarksdale, Mississippi, known as the “birthplace of the blues.”  Through the digitization of photographs, legal documents, family recipes, maps, personal letters, business records, visual art, and audiovisual materials, the project would preserve Clarksdale’s history.  The proposed events aim to increase awareness especially of the “non-blues” history of this Mississippi Delta city, including the Civil Rights Movement, regional foodways, the Mississippi River and environment, religious practices, agricultural heritage, literary achievements, and Chinese, Lebanese, Jewish, and Italian immigration to the region.  The project involves collaboration with Clarksdale Carnegie Public Library, whose staff would run the digitization event, and Coahoma County Higher Education Center, where a community event highlighting notable items and describing their historical and cultural context would be held.  After the project, the library would make digitized materials available via a Common Heritage website.

Clarksdale, Mississippi, is one of the most culturally significant cities in the Mississippi Delta and is internationally famous as the "birthplace of the blues." However, important non-blues aspects of its history are often overlooked. The significance of its people and events as well as the ways in which normal citizens have contributed to the Delta's rich culture have not been documented. This project will be the first systematic opportunity for the citizens of Clarksdale to contribute to preserving their city's history through the digitizing and archiving of historical materials.

Korean American Historical Society (Seattle, WA 98104-3035)
Mel Kang (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258589-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$8,255 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

The Collective Memory of the Korean Community: "We Are What We Are Because of Our Memories"

Two community digitization days and a day-long outreach event to discuss immigration history and Korean-American communities around the United States. The applicant would undertake this project to digitize and preserve heritage materials in cooperation with the Wing Luke Museum. Events would raise awareness of the importance of family collections and heritage among community members. The project would focus on family collections and materials that document domestic life, immigration, small businesses, and community organizations. Project staff would draw on contributed materials to create lesson plans encouraging teachers to integrate the subject matter into primary education. With permission, digitized items would be made available through the Wing Luke Museum’s website.

The Korean American Historical Society (KAHS) in partnership with the Wing Luke Museum plans to collect the kinds of things that show us what it means, and meant, to be Korean American. KAHS will conduct two to three public events to digitize this material followed by a community discussion lead by Professor Moon Ho Jung. The community event will focus on the larger Korean and United States historical context of the collected materials. We will also develop a curriculum for the 60 Korean language schools in Washington to pass on the lessons of the compilation to the next generation. To achieve these goals we plan to reach out to second generation Korean Americans by working with Korean American civic and professional groups and Korean language schools. We do this because in Korean culture individual humility is important. Older Koreans often consider their individual stories insignificant. However their children have the perspective to realize the importance of these individual stories.The Korean American Historical Society in partnership with the Wing Luke Museum plans to collect the kinds of things that show us what it means, and meant, to be Korean American. KAHS will conduct two to three public events to digitize this material followed by a community discussion lead by Professor Moon Ho Jung. The community event will focus on the larger Korean and United States historical context of the collected materials. We will also develop a curriculum for the 60 Korean language schools in Washington to pass on the lessons of the compilation to the next generation. To achieve these goals we plan to reach out to second generation Korean Americans by working with Korean American civic and professional groups and Korean language schools. We do this because in Korean culture individual humility is important. Older Koreans often consider their individual stories insignificant. However their children have the perspective to realize the importance of these individual stories.

Conyers Rockdale Library System (Conyers, GA 30012-5308)
Mary Jean Harrison (Project Director: May 2017 to present)

PY-258596-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,922 (approved)
$11,922 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

African-American Faith and Heritage in Rockdale County

A day-long digitization event for heritage materials from African American church congregations in Conyers, Georgia.  The scanning event, held in partnership with the Rockdale County Genealogical Society, would welcome public contributions of items such as family trees, personal letters, award certificates, baptism certificates, family bible pages, and other historical objects.  The applicant aims to address an imbalance in existing community archival holdings, in which the area’s large African American population is represented mainly in slave schedules and records of a few prominent families.  Digitized materials would be shared via the Digital Library of Georgia.  The applicant also plans three public programs produced in collaboration with Georgia HomePLACE.  A “Local Voices” speaker program would provide a forum for African American community leaders to share heritage stories; experts would train the Rockdale Genealogical Society and members of the public in the use of digitization equipment; and a program would educate participants on conducting genealogical research.

African-American churches in Rockdale County have long served as vital community hubs in our increasingly diverse and growing population. The Library will expand opportunities for these congregations to document and preserve their histories. For the ‘African-American Faith and Heritage’ project, we will reach out to churches to invite community members to bring heritage materials for digital preservation. Participants at the day-long scanning event will be able to submit and share online through the Digital Library of Georgia. In conjunction with the scanning event, the Library will host a speaker program called “Local Voices” as well as programs to educate participants on conducting genealogical research. The Nancy Guinn Memorial Library will seek advice and training from the Rockdale Genealogical Society and Georgia HomePLACE. With this project, Rockdale County will have extended the documentation of its rich heritage throughout our African-American congregations.

University of Washington (Seattle, WA 98105-6613)
Devin Naar (Project Director: May 2017 to May 2021)

PY-258611-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,990 (approved)
$11,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Seattle's Sephardic Legacies

A digitization day and simultaneous presentation on Ladino history and culture in the Pacific Northwest. These events would be followed by a second public event that would study and interpret the heritage items digitized during the initial digitization day. Seattle is one of the major global centers of Ladino culture and language, and the community would be invited to contribute heritage materials documenting the local community, including postcards, letters, photographs, memoirs, travel documents, marriage certificates, recipes, musical notation, and other items. With permission, digitized items would be made available as part of the Center’s digital collections in collaboration with the University of Washington Libraries. Events would be co-sponsored by the university as well as the James Garfield High School.

The University of Washington proposes to host a one-day digitization event titled “Seattle’s Sephardic Legacies” at Garfield High School in Seattle’s historic Central District in May, 2018. This event will feature presentations by humanities scholars on the little-known history of the Sephardic community in Seattle, Washington, during the Great Depression, and trace the lasting contributions of this demographic to the city’s industrial and cultural landscape today. At this event, which will be open to the public, a team of University archival workers will digitize a range of materials written in Ladino, the vanishing language of the peripatetic Sephardic people of Europe and North Africa. With permission from the owners, these items will be included in the Sephardic Studies Digital Archive at the University of Washington, the world’s first and only robust library and archive of original materials pertaining to the history and experience of the Sephardic people.

Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA 19107-5601)
John Anderies (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258616-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,963 (approved)
$11,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Digitizing for Underrepresented LGBT Communities in the Philadelphia Area

Two digitization days and three public programs focusing on groups within the LGBT community of Philadelphia that are underrepresented in the center's John J. Wilcox, Jr. Archives. The project would recruit three outreach coordinators to encourage participation from the identified communities of women, people of color, and transgender individuals. The digitization efforts would focus on personal memorabilia such as correspondence, diaries, flyers, posters, photographs, slides, scrapbooks, 'zines, artwork, ephemera, banners, t-shirts, buttons, and small objects. Oversized materials would be photographed by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and audiovisual materials would be sent to George Blood Audio and Video for reformatting. Additionally, the William Way LGBT Community Center would collaborate with staff from the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) in planning for the digitization events. CCAHA would also lead one of the public programs, a workshop on the preservation of personal collections.

The William Way LGBT Community Center seeks support for two digitization events and subsequent cultural heritage programming for underrepresented LGBT communities in the Philadelphia area, specifically women, people of color, and transgender individuals. The project will serve to further enhance our relationships with these communities, document their rich history, and promote greater understanding and appreciation for the past. It will stress the cultural value of the material owned by the communities and provide tools to help preserve it. We will offer three types of community programming: a hands-on workshop given by the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts in personal collections preservation care; a half-day event featuring outside speakers on the topic of LGBT community archiving and heritage; and a program that features community members and material brought forth during the digitization sessions, highlighting those with particularly compelling stories.

Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Foundation (Indianapolis, IN 46208-5732)
Meaghan Fukunaga (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258627-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,510 (approved)
$11,510 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Everyday Experience: African Americans in Indianapolis

Three digitization events at the Indianapolis Public Library focused on preserving local history materials. Follow-up public outreach events would focus on the area’s African American community, which represents over a quarter of the city’s population, and would highlight such topics as jazz, Negro League baseball, and land ownership. The events would encourage digitization of photographs, family and church records, personal letters, and other documents, with the possibility of digitizing audiovisual materials separately. With donor permission, digitized materials would be made available via Digital Indy, the library’s digital collections and exhibition site.

Everyday Experience: African Americans in Indianapolis will provide opportunities for the digitization of family heritage materials from Indianapolis’ African Americans, while also presenting engaging public programming to both educate and celebrate that heritage with the wider community. The Indianapolis Public Library will hold at least three public scan-a-thons to create a new digital collection focused on the African-American experience. Based on the items digitized, the Library will also host public programming to explore and provide context for the materials collected. Programming topics could include Negro League Baseball, Jazz on Indiana Avenue or an exploration of neighborhood segregation. With the correct permissions, the digitized materials will become part of the Library’s digital collections, available to the public, researchers and more. The project dovetails with the Library’s digitization efforts and creation of a Center for Black Literature and Culture.

Siena College (Loudonville, NY 12211-1462)
Janet Lee Shideler (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258632-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$8,980 (approved)
$7,468 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019

Je Me Souviens (I Remember): Presenting and Preserving the Heritage of Upstate New York’s Franco-American Communities

A digitization day and public programming to collect and celebrate Franco-American culture in upstate New York. The project would digitize photos, letters, immigration papers, sheet music, heirlooms, handmade garments, devotional medals and rosaries, rugs, tapestries, and other objects that reflect the traditions and cultural heritage of this community. The public program would take place in Cohoes, in one of the former textile mills along the Mohawk River that attracted thousands of French-Canadians with the promise of employment. By 1881, Cohoes was the adopted home of over 6,000 Québécois, a number that composed over a third of the city’s population. Descendants who share their family memorabilia would receive digital copies on flash drives, and with their permission, the digital files and their bilingual (English/French) metadata would become part of the New York Heritage Digital Collections (NYHDC) to which Siena College is a contributor. The NYHDC website is a research portal visited by historians, genealogists, students, and educators from across the state and country. The project would draw upon the expertise of Siena College’s faculty and library staff, as well as partnerships with local organizations, such as the Spindle City Historic Society and the Fédération Franco-Américaine du New York in Cohoes, to reach out to members of the community.

This project seeks to preserve and digitize a broad array of artifacts that reflect the rich cultural heritage of upstate New York's aging Franco-American population. With community partners, Siena College faculty, librarians and students will organize, promote and host a public digitization and cultural event in Cohoes, NY, the city to which French Canadians immigrated beginning in the 1830s. They went on become the city's largest ethnic group in the 20th century. The event will include a lecture by a scholar of Franco-American culture and a performance by renowned Franco-American singer-songwriter Josee Vachon. Cultural and historical items brought to the event by Franco-Americans will be digitized and shared on a publicly accessible digital collection, and oral histories will be documented, all in time for what is likely the last francophone generation to describe their significance to researchers and to young Franco-Americans who are increasingly unaware of their own rich heritage.

University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire (Eau Claire, WI 54701-4811)
Dan Ott (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258633-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$10,844 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

The Sounds of Eau Claire “History Harvest”: A Digitization, Oral History, and Public Humanities Project on Local Music

Two history harvests to document the musical history and culture of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and public outreach lectures on the area’s musical history. The proposed project would support a collaboration between the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, and the Chippewa Valley Museum to gather family documents, artifacts, and stories. The goal of the project is to better document the city's musical history, particularly in light of the area’s strong music education efforts and recent surge in music performance around this small city of 68,000. The ethnic history of the area has given it a unique musical flavor, including many genres such as polkabilly, Norwegian and German concertina and polka, Ojibwe powwows, and Hmong music events, featured in a range of venues from churches to house parties to festivals. With donor permission, digitized items would be made available via an Omeka-based website. In addition to the events, the project would engage students in a public history course to curate online exhibits and record a podcast.

The Sounds of Eau Claire “History Harvest” will document and share the roots and cultural dimensions of a recent musical renaissance in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Over the last several years the community has reinvented itself as a “Music City” built on indie rock, festivals, and the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire’s nationally-acclaimed jazz program. Building on that foundation and meeting a community desire for better music history, this project will facilitate local co-curation of its musical heritage from the ground up. Through contributing personal and family stories, artifacts, and documents, participants will work with public historians to digitally preserve and share the region’s music history. Including a variety of public programs – humanities presentations, musical performances, podcasts, a digital collection and digital exhibits – this project extends beyond digitization towards fostering a more dynamic local appreciation of the region’s musical past.

El Paso Community College (El Paso, TX 79915-1914)
Lisa Elliott (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258635-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,964 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2019

Betwixt And Between: Liminality in El Paso,TX and Colonia Juarez, MX

Creation of a digital archive to document descendants of the Colonia Juarez settlement living in the El Paso, Texas, and Juarez, Mexico, area.  Colonia Juarez was settled as one of eight Mormon Colonies in Mexico in the late 19th century.  Many residents have traveled between Texas and Mexico or lived in both places.  The project would aim to increase awareness of this “liminal” population, scanning materials in both El Paso and the Mormon Colonies and holding a public history lecture in Texas.  Members of the community would be invited to contribute photographs, journals, and other memorabilia for digitization, and specially trained students would collect oral histories.  The collected artifacts and stories would be integrated into the “3D Digital Wall” at El Paso’s Museum of History and compiled into a digital research guide.  A public lecture at the El Paso Community College, delivered by a professor of Religious Studies at the University of Texas at El Paso, would elucidate this little-documented borderland history.  The applicant would collaborate with the El Paso History Museum, the University of North Texas, and representatives of the Mormon Colonies to engage community members and promote the preservation and use of digitized items.

The El Paso Community College (EPCC) Communication and Performing Arts department proposes a project that will digitize artifacts (photos, journals, and other memorabilia) of descendants of Colonia Juarez, Mexico.  At present, there are several hundred descendants of the Colonia Juarez settlers living in the El Paso/Juarez area. They represent a theme that is common to many living in a border community, including some of our students - the feeling of being "betwixt and between" and not really belonging, or fitting in, to either place. EPCC students will digitize artifacts gathered from this community to be displayed for view by the public on the El Paso History Museum's Digital Wall, on an EPCC Library Guide, and will be the topic of a community lecture.

Montana Historical Society (Helena, MT 59601-4514)
Molly Kruckenberg (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258638-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$8,466 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Drill Rigs and Grain Silos: Harvesting Food History to Capture the Culture of a Community in Change

Two digitization days and a public lecture aiming to document local history and culture through foodways in Richland and Roosevelt counties in Montana. The project would focus on documenting foodways through family recipes, cookbooks, photographs of celebrations, picnics and fairs, records of homemaker clubs, and artifacts related to food preservation and preparation. Outreach events would explore local history and cultural influence, using such foodways as a lens to better understand local history and immigration. The effort to collect local history materials comes amidst the social and economic changes brought by the current boom in natural gas. The counties are also home to land that the Assiniboine consider their ancestral home, and nineteenth-century waves of immigration saw arrivals from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Russia, and Germany. Contributed items would complement existing collections of Montana cookbooks already digitized by the Montana Historical Society, which include few materials from these rural areas of the state. The project would, with permission, make digitized items accessible via Montana Memory, the state’s digital library portal.

Richland and Roosevelt counties in eastern Montana have long been subject to a boom and bust cycle, from homesteading to oil. The Baaken oil field spills into this rural area and the effects of the boom have brought profound changes. As communities here struggle with change, surviving food traditions provide continuity. Through a partnership of heritage institutions and Extension offices, this project will gather digital reproductions of food-related items that tell the history of the foodways of the area, with the digitized materials made available on the Montana Memory Project. Using those materials Montana food historians will present a public program that will interpret Montana food history and the food customs specific to eastern Montana. The program will improve the community’s understanding of their heritage by demonstrating the centrality of food to traditions and examining the role of food as a benchmark during times of upheaval and in bringing people together.

Central Washington University (Ellensburg, WA 98926-7500)
Julia Stringfellow (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258640-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$9,877 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Community History of Central Washington

Three digitization programs to preserve and document local history in central Washington. The project would aim to preserve family and community history items from Ellensburg, a town of 18,000, an agricultural community with a rich Native American legacy and history of European immigration. The project would accept photographic images, journals, personal papers, and other documents for digitization. Along with digitization services, participants would receive preservation kits that include preservation supplies and advice. With donor permission, digitized items would be made available through the Central Washington University digital repository.

The proposed program provides a series of three workshops held to educate local community members on preserving their family's history and archives and how that history aligns with the community cultural heritage. The Summer 2018 workshops will be held in the Brooks Library at CWU in Ellensburg, Roslyn Public Library, and Yakima Nation Library. The workshops will be conducted by the CWU Archives staff, and will provide an overview of preservation and scanning of materials. At the end of the workshop, each attendee will receive a flash drive of the digital content they scanned and, with their written consent, the CWU Archives will retain a copy of the content to preserve in their repository as part of local history. Portable scanners will be purchased and a scanner will be donated to each of the participating libraries. The goals of the events are to establish an annual digitization day to build community relationships, develop community cultural awareness, and educate on preservation.

Somerset County Library System (Bridgewater, NJ 08807-2136)
Rebecca Ann Sloat (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258642-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Somerset County, New Jersey: The Evolution of a Thriving Community: From Farming to Fortune 500 and Beyond

Eight digitization days and eight public programs to be held at different branch libraries in the Somerset County Library System. Public programs would focus both on preservation techniques for personal and family collections, as well as on local agricultural history. At one program, a local history librarian would discuss how the county’s library system grew out of a 1930 mandate to improve rural access to library services. In response, the county developed a book lending network, composed of staff, citizens, book trucks, schools, churches, and private homes. In addition, an exhibit on Somerset County’s agricultural heritage would be featured at the annual Somerset County 4-H Fair. The project would be supported by partnerships with community-based organizations, such as the Somerset County Historical Society, the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Somerset County, the Courier News, Franklin Township Public Library, and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities. Digitized local history items would be made available on a county website, as well through a research portal, the New Jersey Digital Highway at Rutgers University Libraries.

Somerset County, New Jersey, is a true cultural mosaic. From its earliest history, it has grown from an epicenter of the farming industry to become a diverse community comprised of over 333,000 people, boasting over 8,000 acres of preserved farmland while also being home to powerhouse Fortune 500 companies. Somerset County Library System (SCLSNJ) plans to take the next steps toward building a community memory. We will embark on an eighteen-month series of eight programming and eight digitization events. We invite our diverse cultures to learn about their NJ history while also preserving it! SCLSNJ will partner with neighboring libraries, community and cultural organizations within Somerset County. Personal narratives and memorabilia will be digitized to forever add a personal mark in the history of the county, and the website MySomersetCounty.org will be expanded and designed for ease-of-use so that it might be a tool for future generations of researchers and community.

HSU Foundation (Arcata, CA 95521-8222)
Carly Marino (Project Director: May 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258644-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,977 (approved)
$11,977 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 8/31/2019

30 Years After "Lyng v Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association"

Two digitization days and a public symposium to discuss Native American culture, land, and sovereignty. The project would solicit community materials relating to the history of Native American sovereignty and activism in Northern California on the 30-year anniversary of Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association, a case that centered on land use and Native sovereignty in northern California. The applicant would seek to digitize historic images, objects, and documents related to tribal activism, sacred site protection, and indigenous land use and land rights from local tribes connected to the case, as well as non-Native community members. The project would add to historical materials available for the study of the grassroots efforts of the American Indian Movement and tribal communities with which Humboldt University Library has strong relationships. With donor permission, materials would be made publicly accessible through an Omeka-based website.

This project will explore the past, present and future of the 1988 Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association Supreme Court case to capture the community heritage of Native American sovereignty and self-determination demonstrated in Northwest California tribal activism. The goal of this project is to create dialogue between members of tribal communities to relay the history of indigenous activism in the region while educating the public in methods of preserving their unique family treasures. This project is a year-long program which will highlight the 30th anniversary of the Lyng Supreme Court case. We will use materials made available from California Indian activists and non-native allies, archival collections of Native American scholars, and will feature oral histories from the plaintiffs. This project includes a two day digitization event, symposium, oral history project and a public exhibition of the collected materials.

Grand Valley State University (Allendale, MI 49401-9403)
Kimberly McKee (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258657-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,798 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Documenting the Histories of Summers in Saugatuck-Douglas

Digitization of heritage materials in two history harvests, collection of oral histories related to local history, and a community symposium to learn about the area’s history of tourism. The project would be coordinated by Grand Valley State University (GVSU) and the Saugatuck-Douglas History Center to gather and preserve historical materials about shoreline communities along Lake Michigan. Although tourism supports various economic, social, and cultural development in the towns of Saugatuck and Douglas, the history of this industry is little documented in historical collections. Public historians from GVSU and the community would provide history and interpretive information about the contributed items. Digital copies would be provided to attendees and held for long-term preservation in the digital collections of GVSU Libraries, Special Collections, and Archives.

West Michigan's landscape reflects the histories of a bustling tourism industry along the shoreline of Lake Michigan during the summer. Many of these areas were profoundly transformed, garnering reputations for their acceptance of minorities. The twin lakeshore communities of Saugatuck-Douglas, became an important touchstone in thinking about the region’s LGBT history as the towns became a “home for all,” including a college youth invasion, motorcycle gangs, beach-goers, concert-goers, as well as the LGBT community. Although stories are told about motels and inns that welcomed gay customers or lax policing of state liquor laws that banned serving homosexuals, few records or oral histories discuss these topics. This project documents the area’s rise to become a destination of the LGBT community and other contemporary stories through oral histories and digitization of objects, photographs, and ephemera while the people who experienced these times are still able to share them.

University of North Carolina, Greensboro (Greensboro, NC 27412-5068)
Jennifer Motszko (Project Director: June 2017 to June 2018)
James David Gwynn (Project Director: June 2018 to March 2021)

PY-258664-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,229 (approved)
$7,347 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

PRIDE! of the Community: Documenting LGBTQ+ History in the Triad

Three day-long digitization events, a panel discussion, and a public lecture to document and preserve historical sources relating to the LGBTQ+ community of North Carolina’s Piedmont Triad region.  Members of the community would be invited to submit personal items for digitization and description.  The applicant expects to collect archival materials reflecting political themes, student groups, and state and national organizations such as Equality North Carolina, PFLAG, GSAFE, and PRIDE.  Using this community-based approach, the applicant hopes to expand existing narratives of Southern LGBTQ+ identities, including sexuality, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion.  A proposed historical lecture and panel discussion, building on the items collected for digital preservation, would include representatives from several perspectives.  The applicant would partner with the Guilford Green Foundation, a local LGBTQ community organization.

The University Libraries of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) will partner with the Guilford Green Foundation to preserve and make accessible the history of the LGBTQ+ community of the Piedmont Triad of North Carolina (Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point). Members of the LGBTQ+ community can bring personal items for digitization and description, creating digital content chronicling the history of the population. This project would be the first large-scale initiative to document the LGBTQ+ history of the Triad. Given the unique cultural climate of North Carolina historically and presently, it is anticipated that modern materials will reflect political themes, especially in relation to recent discord over North Carolina Amendment 1, House Bill 2, and House Bill 780. Additionally, with over twenty institutions of higher education in the area, there will be documents and artifacts relating to LGBTQ+ student groups, including representation from three HBCUs.

University of North Texas (Denton, TX 76203-5017)
Laura Jean Treat (Project Director: June 2017 to August 2019)

PY-258670-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,859 (approved)
$11,859 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Spotlight on North Texas: The City of Dallas

A community digitization event and public programs to preserve the visual histories of Dallas, Texas.  The proposed project aims to collect community materials related to Dallas’s motion picture history, especially from underrepresented groups, in order to redefine perceptions of how North Texas contributed to film production and consumption.  The applicant and project partner TAMI (Texas Archive of the Moving Image) would provide participants with free digitization of up to 1,000 feet of motion picture film, five videotapes, and two documents per person.  Materials would include motion picture histories collected and created by members of the community, including home movies and amateur films as well as print documents of local film production and distribution.  The University of North Texas would provide access to materials through its Portal to Texas History.  Community events at two historic businesses in Oak Cliff, one of Dallas’s oldest and most diverse neighborhoods, would promote engagement with public history and media preservation.  The proposed project would build on a previous Common Heritage award, which focused on preserving the visual histories of Denton, Texas.

The University of North Texas Libraries seek $11,859 to preserve and provide access to the visual histories of Dallas, Texas. This project will support the digitization and preservation of community materials related to Dallas' motion picture histories, including 30,000 feet of film, 150 videotapes, and 750 documents. We will support access and education by providing access to digitized content on The Portal to Texas History. We will emphasize the value of community records through public programming that situates Dallas within Texas' film history and explores the evolving urban landscapes of one of Dallas' most diverse and historic neighborhoods, Oak Cliff. Focusing on materials related to our filmic past-home movies, amateur film, advertisements, and photographs-we will illuminate the value of community records and redefine how cities like Dallas contributed to film history.

University of Massachusetts, Boston (Boston, MA 02125-3300)
Carolyn Goldstein (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258672-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$11,919 (approved)
$11,777 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Local Rappers, DJs,B-Boys and Graff: Documenting the Massachusetts Hip-Hop Community from the 1970's to the Present

A digitization event held at the Boston Public Library’s central branch in Copley Square at which staff from University Archives and Special Collections of the University of Massachusetts Boston would invite members of the community to share materials related to the city’s hip-hop culture: demo tapes, performance videos, flyers, posters, photographs, clothing, and accessories. Items would be digitized for the participants’ personal use and, with their permission, possibly included in the Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive, which is housed on UMass Boston’s Open Archives. The resulting digital collections would be harvested by the Digital Commonwealth and the Digital Public Library of America, making these materials and the participants’ stories discoverable to a wide-reaching audience. Boston Public Library would also present a series of four public programs celebrating and exploring elements of hip-hop culture: rapping (MCing), DJing (turntabling), breakdancing (b-boying), and graffiti art (graff). The events would include demonstrations by local artists, invite public participation, and be guided by two scholars of hip-hop music and culture, Dasan Ahanu from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and Michael Jeffries from Wellesley College.

The University Archives and Special Collections (UASC) in the Joseph P. Healey Library at the University of Massachusetts Boston requests a Common Heritage Grant in the amount of $11,919. This grant will allow UASC to collaborate with the Boston Public Library (BPL), the Boston hip-hop community, and noted scholars Dasan Ahanu and Michael Jeffries to accomplish two goals: host a digitizing day to collect artifacts and stories that will be uploaded to the Massachusetts Hip-Hop Archive; and present four public outreach programs showcasing the four original elements of hip-hop culture: rap, DJing, dance, and graffiti art, contextualizing the materials collected at the digitization event. Community members who participated in the development of hip-hop culture in Massachusetts will contribute artifacts to the event and serve as audience and participants in the public programs, thereby documenting, preserving, and celebrating cultural memory from a marginalized part of the state’s history.

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL 60208-0001)
Kelly Wisecup (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258677-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$10,804 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

The American Indian Center of Chicago and Urban Native American Histories

Three digitization events to collect local history materials and a complementary public outreach symposium focused on Native American history in Chicago. The events would be managed by Northwestern University in collaboration with Chicago’s American Indian Center. Current historical collections about Native Americans in Chicago focus largely on organizational records rather than community history, so the proposed project would solicit photographs, newsletters, artwork, and other objects that document the history of the community. With donor permission, digitized items would be preserved through the Northwestern University Libraries, which would also make the materials available through a digital exhibit.

This digitization event and digital archive project will help to preserve previously undocumented materials about the American Indian Center of Chicago (AIC), focusing especially on its importance to the Chicago Native American community between 1960 and the present. The event will enable the AIC community to share their materials and memories with one another at several community events. The project will result in a digital archive through which they can continue to access their heritage materials and share them with the general public.

African American Heritage Foundation, Inc. (Louisville, KY 40203-1656)
Aukram Burton (Project Director: June 2017 to present)

PY-258684-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Telling Our Story

Two digitization days and four outreach events for the public, with a focus on the African American community and history in West Louisville, Kentucky. The project would conclude with a genealogy symposium and exhibition of the digitized materials. The Center for African American Heritage has strong ties to the community and would solicit a variety of heritage materials, including audiovisual items (to be digitized separately), photographs, slides, letters, and other items in family collections.

In March 2017, four neighborhoods in the predominately black West Louisville experienced death from gun violence within 5 hours. However, all West Louisville residents must not be painted as victim or criminal. This funding will enable the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage (KCAAH) to create a new narrative for West Louisville, highlighting family histories and legacies of cooperative economics through oral history and material preservation. KCAAH will host 2 community collection days and 4 events that will expand the understanding of the community’s heritage. There will be 2 digitization and 2 oral history stations available to receive contributions from up to 64 people. The community events include a kick-off community dialogue, a preview event that will showcase a sample of materials digitized during Community Collection Day #1, the Community Genealogy Summit, and the culminating show of a larger sample of all digitized materials and launch of the online collection.

Geographical Center Historical Society (Rugby, ND 58368-2400)
Stephanie Steinke (Project Director: June 2017 to June 2018)
Jacqueline A. Johnson (Project Director: June 2018 to March 2021)

PY-258693-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 5/31/2019

Preserving and Presenting the History of the Geographical Center of North Dakota, Pierce County, North Dakota

Six digitization events around the community of Rugby, North Dakota, which would aid in the digitization and preservation of historical items from Pierce County. Project outreach would be accomplished through mobile exhibits and digital projects, including short videos about the community’s history, which will be available through the Geographical Center Historical Society. Project staff would gather metadata and permissions from donors, and would coordinate the scanning of documents, film, slides, and photographs.

The goal of the Geographical Center Historical Society’s “Preserving and Presenting the History of the Geographical Center of America, Pierce County, North Dakota” project is to help area residents digitally preserve historic photographs, letters, diaries and other documents and to archive those documents for future reference at Prairie Village Museum, Rugby. The Society will host document scanning events at various locations and at Prairie Village Museum, which is operated by the Society. Using digitized documents and student-conducted interviews, students at Rugby High School will create a video on the region’s early history. Museum staff will use scanned documents to create a mobile exhibit. The video and the exhibit will debut at the Society’s annual Spring Kick-Off and storytelling event. This digitization project is important because it will preserve previously undocumented historical materials and educate the community on the how’s and why’s of preserving the past.

Missouri Humanities Council (St. Louis, MO 63103-2269)
Caitlin Yager (Project Director: June 2017 to August 2019)

PY-258694-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,903 (approved)
$11,903 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 12/31/2018

Digitizing Missouri's German Heritage

A two-day digitization event in Hermann, Missouri, and subsequent outreach programs focused on German-American heritage in the region. Digitized items would be made available to the public through the Missouri Humanities Council’s German Heritage Project and a digital publication. The project would focus on the digitization of artifacts, documents, and photographs relating to German and German-American culture in the German Heritage Corridor, a stretch along the Missouri River Valley spanning 17 counties in largely rural areas of Missouri.

This project seeks to digitize publically-held artifacts, documents, and photographs related to Missouri’s German Heritage. Inspired by Gottfried Duden’s Report of a Journey to the Western States of North America (1829), which compares the beauty of the Missouri River Valley to that of the Rhineland in Germany, a steady migration of Germans immigrated to Missouri beginning in the late 1820s and continuing until World War I. A number of these immigrants settled in an area that has been designated (officially) the “German Heritage Corridor of Missouri.” The focus of this project will be a two-day digitization event in June 2018, which will preserve photos, heirlooms, and documents collected by families in and around the corridor. Following the digitization, MHC will host a public outreach program featuring a scholar-led interpretation and presentation of the findings of the digitization event as well as some of the larger efforts of MHC to understand Missouri’s unique German heritage.

Links Hall, Inc. (Chicago, IL 60618-6409)
Meida McNeal (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258704-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

From Warehouse To Web: Digitizing House Music Ephemera and Material Culture

A digitization day and a public symposium focused on the history and material culture of African American house music, dance, and culture in Chicago from the late 1970s to the end of the twentieth century. The events would solicit photographs, posters, flyers, clothing, and other materials that document the history of this music scene. In addition, events would provide tutorials on the preservation of various heritage materials. With donor permission, digitized items would be accessioned by the archives of the Center for Black Music Research (CBMR) at Columbia College Chicago. Historians from the CBMR would also provide historical context about the history of African American music in Chicago.

From Warehouse to Web will establish a foundation from which leaders can continue to develop programming opportunities for archiving and sharing digital ephemera from the house music era beginning in the 1970s and 1980s evolving to the present, as well as creative documentation of sartorial expressions. Project collaborators Center for Black Music Research, Modern Dance Music and Archiving Foundation, Links Hall, and Honey Pot Performance will create stable, variable types of digital access through online platforms. It is essential that these vital records of Chicago, American, and queer of color cultural history are preserved and shared in years to come. By creating new access points to previously balkanized private collections of historical materials, Warehouse to Web will do something entirely new for Chicago’s grassroots house music communities, who have yet to see an approach that honors everyday participants in the culture, as opposed to the most popular and profitable artists.

Perkins Center for the Arts (Moorestown, NJ 08057-2725)
Karen Boelter Abdul-Malik (Project Director: June 2017 to March 2021)

PY-258723-18
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2018 – 6/30/2019

Tastefully South Jersey

Three digitization days and one culminating exhibit of the materials gathered to showcase the historical and cultural foodways of South Jersey residents, to include the tools, recipes, and cookbooks they use and preserve among their families, along with an interactive storytelling concert. The digitization events would be hosted in three different counties in South Jersey, at the Burlington County Library, the Gloucester County Library, and the Homestead Youth Association in Camden County. Staff of the Folklife Center at the Perkins Center for the Arts, the lead organizer, would partner with other local organizations in the tri-county area—the Haitian Society of Willingboro, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority in Glassboro, the Polish American Society, the Caribbean Festival Organization, and the Boys and Girls Club of Camden—to encourage participation among the region’s diverse communities. A digital data curator from Rutgers University Library and a folklorist and foodways professor from Goucher College would advise the project team in planning and implementing the events and exhibit.

Tastefully South Jersey Family Heritage Preservation Project and public programming explores culture through the lens of food traditions in three southern counties of New Jersey. An event will be held in each county for community members to preserve heritage artifacts such as recipes, foodways tools, photographs, documents, and pottery through digitization. Communities targeted through fieldwork are West African influenced and Southern African-American, Dominican Republican, Haitian, Cuban, Polish, Ukrainian, Turkish, Mexican, Peruvian, and Guatemalan. The project includes audiovisual documentation of stories and contextual information. Participants receive a free digital copy. Permission will be requested to exhibit digitized items at the culminating exhibition, shared on our website and be housed in New Jersey State Libraries Digital Collections. The project explores topics on the importance of foodways in expressing identity, maintaining community cohesion, and performing ritual.

Universidad Ana G. Mendez - Recinto de Carolina (Carolina, PR 00984-2010)
Jaime R. Partsch (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)

PY-252801-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,748 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Recovering Memories: Canovanas Constructs Its History

Two community digitization days in Canóvanas, a city in the northeastern part of Puerto Rico, to collect photographs and memorabilia from area residents. The project would bring together the municipal government of Canóvanas, the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture, and the Universidad del Este, whose library staff would be in charge of archiving and describing the items brought in for digitization. The project would invite community members to document the economic and cultural aspects of the town’s history, highlighting its transformation from a small sugar cane outpost to a complex “bedroom community” on the fringes of San Juan. The digitized images would be exhibited and presented in four venues: the Piñero House Museum, the Public Library in the Campo Rico sector, the town square, and the Municipal Center for Aging. A workshop is also planned for local public and private schools, entitled “Interpreting Images: Our Town in History.”

"Recovering memories: Canóvanas constructs its history" is a collaborative effort of the Jesus T. Pinero Library and Research Center of the Universidad del Este, the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture and the Municipality of Canóvanas designed to record this history and a wide-scale discussion of the major cultural and economic changes that have marked the area.

Citadel, The (Charleston, SC 29409-0001)
Kerry Taylor (Project Director: May 2016 to October 2019)
Marina Lopez (Co Project Director: January 2017 to October 2019)

PY-253019-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$11,990 (approved)
$11,990 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Aqui Estamos - Documenting the Latino Heritage of the South Carolina Low Country

Two days of digitizing community contributions, including personal and official correspondence, photographs, diaries, recipe books, beloved objects, scrapbooks, and other materials to illuminate the life and history of the Latino communities of the South Carolina Low Country. The Citadel would partner with several local organizations for this project: the Special Collections department at the College of Charleston’s Addlestone Library (a local affiliate of the South Carolina Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America), the Charleston County Public Library, El Círculo Hispanoamericano de Charleston, the Hispanic Business Association, and radio El Sol AM 980. The project would recruit bilingual volunteers from the Citadel, the College of Charleston, and Charleston Southern University to help staff the events and translate for the creation of metadata to describe the items brought in for digitization. This project would build on an existing oral history program at the Citadel focused on the Latino community. Of particular interest to the project organizers is the history of the development of Latino-led institutions, such as businesses, civic groups, and churches in the area. During Hispanic American Heritage month of 2017 (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15), the project directors would return to Charleston public libraries to hold community forums to present some of the items brought in during the digitization days.

The Citadel Oral History Program is offering a series of public programs and digitization events for the Latino community. Harvest days will take place in the spring of 2017 at Charleston County libraries (Johns Island and North Charleston). The materials collected will be processed and evaluated during the summer and deposited with the College of Charleston's Special Collections. During Hispanic Heritage month of 2017, we will return to the libraries to hold community forums to present the results of the project. Citadel professors Aguirre and Taylor will draw from the materials that we gathered to facilitate discussions on immigration, identity, exclusion and belonging, community building and civil rights. The forums will attract students, workers, scholars, and activists. The materials will be shared with the public through the Low Country Digital Library. We will continue to promote "Aqui Estamos" and encourage teachers to use the collection in the classroom.

Kentucky Historical Society (Frankfort, KY 40601-1931)
Sara Elliott (Project Director: May 2016 to May 2018)

PY-253022-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,063 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 3/31/2018

Integrating Segregated Histories

A day-long digitization event to capture documents and artifacts from two distinctive communities that remain underrepresented in the region’s historical record: the African American and Jewish residents of Hopkinsville and Christian County, Kentucky.  In partnership with the Museums of Hopkinsville, the applicant would also organize a second day-long public event with panel discussions and workshops, providing the opportunity for the project partners to share what they have learned and to engage the communities in preserving, interpreting, and commemorating their memories and stories. The panel discussions would serve to contextualize the digitized materials within broader historical frameworks, and the workshops would offer information about preserving family documents and photographs and conducting oral history interviews.

Rooted in the slave economy of the 19th century, Hopkinsville, Kentucky, has long been racially divided. Despite being a microcosm of race relations in the United States, little information and few artifacts have been collected pertaining to African American residents. In addition, there is little primary source material available about Jewish residents who acted as a bridge between the black and white communities.  "Integrating Segregated Histories," a project between the Kentucky Historical Society and the Museums of Hopkinsville, seeks to remedy this deficiency. Project partners will invite residents to a day-long digitization event to share experiences, archival materials, and artifacts. This project will also open a dialogue about the current state of race relations.  A follow-up event, including panel discussions and workshops, will place the materials—and conversations—into a larger context, showing residents how their path forward is firmly rooted in the past.

Wing Luke Memorial Foundation (Seattle, WA 98104-2948)
Michelle Kumata (Project Director: May 2016 to November 2019)

PY-253032-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 9/30/2017

Stories across Generations: Burmese Americans in Western Washington

A one-day digitization event for the public and complementary oral history workshops for youth and families. The project, focused on the Burmese-American community in Washington, would allow the community to gather, record, document and share its history. Despite the significant and growing population of Burmese Americans in Washington over the last three decades, this would be the first concerted effort for the community to record, document and share its history. The proposed events seek to bring to light the little-known histories and, by doing so, bridge generations and ethnic differences within the Burmese community to foster communication with and connect the broader public to the stories of this growing immigrant group.

The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience (The Wing) will present “Stories across Generations: Burmese Americans in Western Washington.” The project will bring to light untold and little-known histories of the Burmese American community through two oral history workshops for youth and their families, leading up to a one-day digitization event. This project will provide the opportunity for the region’s Burmese American community to gather, record, document and share its history. Through family stories and cultural heritage materials that span the journey from home country to refugee camp to resettlements to newly adopted home in the U.S., the project will help to foster communication and healing within the Burmese community as well as connect the broader public to the stories of this more recent and growing refugee group.

Connecticut State Library (Hartford, CT 06106-1569)
Christine Pittsley (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)

PY-253034-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$11,329 (approved)
$11,329 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 4/30/2018

Remembering World War One: Sharing History/Preserving Memories

Fifteen digitization day events across the entire state of Connecticut to collect materials related to the state and its population’s involvement in the First World War.  The state played a role in the war effort from the beginning as a major manufacturing hub for firearms and as the home of the U.S. Navy’s first submarine base.  The applicant also notes that this history represents diverse communities, as many African Americans from the South and European immigrants came to work in the factories.  Digitized items would be housed in the Connecticut Digital Library, which is also a hub for the Digital Public Library of America. Along with the digitization days, public events would include lectures related to Connecticut and World War I, with a focus on the particular communities in which the events are held.

This  project is based on the commemoration of the First World War. Working with partners across the state, the State Library will conduct Digitization Day events to surface privately held photos, letters and keepsakes that tell the stories of individual men and women who served during the war. These objects and stories are often held by children of WWI veterans and are in danger of disappearing, as younger generations no longer have ties to the people and events associated with these objects. Through digitization we will preserve them for generations to come.

Southern Oregon University (Ashland, OR 97520-5001)
Maureen Battistella (Project Director: May 2016 to June 2019)
Victoria Sturtevant (Co Project Director: December 2016 to June 2019)

PY-253042-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$12,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2017 – 6/30/2018

Legacy Labor: Making a Living on the Land in Southern Oregon

The development of community historical archives through digitization days and community forums, which will document the agricultural and timber heritage of southern Oregon. Through the digitization of family photographs and other publicly held artifacts, the project would document the dramatic change of Oregon’s landscape over the past century, including the transition away from a timber economy to industrial agriculture and urban development. The project would increase awareness of southern Oregon’s occupational folklore heritage, improve access to important cultural documents, and support partnerships between the Josephine County Historical Society, local public library systems, and the Southern Oregon University. The collected images, artifacts, and stories of heritage farm families and loggers would enrich local and regional collections, provide content for research, enhance pride of place, and showcase the state’s rich heritage. The project would be organized by a consortium of local organizations, led by the Southern Oregon University’s Hannon Library, county 4-H programs of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, Jackson County Library Services, and Josephine County Historical Society.

Southern Oregon's landscape has changed dramatically over the last hundred years. Historic family farms have yielded to housing developments, pear trees have been pulled out to plant vineyards, and timber is nearly played out. The Legacy Labor project is designed to document a way of life that may be lost to memory because of cultural, political, and economic pressures. Legacy Labor organizes humanities-based community forums about the region's agricultural and timber heritage, digitizes family photos and artifacts, and develops rich historical archives for public use. The project is designed to increase awareness of heritage agriculture and timber work life and to enhance the importance of preserving and sharing community values. Legacy Labor: Making a Living on the Land in Southern Oregon focuses on the work life heritage of two contiguous, largely rural counties in Southern Oregon: Jackson and Josephine counties.

Catawba County Library (Newton, NC 28658-3331)
Siobhan Cremins Loendorf (Project Director: May 2016 to August 2019)

PY-253045-17
Common Heritage
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$12,000 (approved)
$11,285 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2017 – 12/31/2018

Hmong Heritage Collection

Five digitization days and a variety of public programming events to capture the memories and artifacts of Hmong community members in Catawba County, just east of North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains. Home to the fourth largest population of Hmong immigrants in the United States, Catawba attracted many refugees from Laos after the Vietnam War. This project seeks to document the experiences and contributions of the Hmong community through a partnership between the Catawba County Library, the Historical Association of Catawba County, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, and two community organizations, Hmong Southeast Puavpheej and Hmong Carolinas, Inc. Members of the Hmong community would be invited to digitize their documents, photos, and letters, and encouraged to provide oral histories for future generations. All of the cultural heritage items, digitized with permission, would be saved on the library’s computer network and published via the Digital Heritage NC website to enable broader public access. Among other public programs planned, the library would host a presentation in June 2017 to showcase traditional Hmong dances and clothing.

The Catawba County Library will collaborate with the Historical Association of Catawba County and the Digital Heritage Center of NC to collect and curate a digital collection of the Hmong community's cultural heritage, making it accessible to the public by publishing the collection on the Digital Heritage website.  The library will host five collection days to gather materials and capture oral histories of our Hmong community members.  To further inform our larger community about Hmong traditions and history, the library will host three adult programs and three book discussions.  Hmong cultural heritage is currently underrepresented in our cultural institutions. This project recognizes the value of their culture and the importance of their history of migration and community building. The goals of this project are aligned with the mission of the local Hmong community organizations to secure and preserve Hmong art and culture and to practice, promote and coordinate cultural activities.