Search Criteria

 






Key Word Search by:









Organization Type


State or Jurisdiction


Congressional District





help

Division or Office
help

Grants to:


Date Range Start


Date Range End


  • Special Searches




    Product Type


    Media Coverage Type








 


Search Results

Grant number like: GI-50135-09

Permalink for this Search

1
Page size:
 1 items in 1 pages
Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
1
Page size:
 1 items in 1 pages
GI-50135-09Public Programs: America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation GrantsUMBCFor All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights8/1/2009 - 7/31/2013$400,000.00Maurice Berger   UMBCBaltimoreMD21250-0001USA2009Arts, GeneralAmerica's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation GrantsPublic Programs40000004000000

Implementation of a traveling exhibition with a catalog, a website, and public and school programs about how photographs and media images were used to influence attitudes toward racial equality and African American culture during the fight to achieve civil rights.

Organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture (CADVC) in partnership with the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, For All The World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights represents the first comprehensive exhibition and publication to analyze the historical role played by visual images in shaping, influencing, and transforming the fight for civil rights in the United States. It will explore the ways this imagery represented race in order to perpetuate the status quo, stimulate dialogue, or change prevailing beliefs and attitudes. It will examine the extent to which the birth of the modern civil rights movement was coextensive with the birth of television and the rise of picture magazines and other forms of visual mass media, effectively capitalizing on the power of visual images to alter perceptions about race.