Search Criteria

 






Key Word Search by:









Organization Type


State or Jurisdiction


Congressional District





help

Division or Office
help

Grants to:


Date Range Start


Date Range End


  • Special Searches




    Product Type


    Media Coverage Type








 


Search Results

Grant number like: HAA-258756-18

Permalink for this Search

1
Page size:
 1 items in 1 pages
Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
1
Page size:
 1 items in 1 pages
HAA-258756-18Digital Humanities: Digital Humanities Advancement GrantsGallaudet UniversityExposing the Borders of Academia: Sign Language as a Medium of Knowledge Production, Preservation, and Dissemination1/1/2018 - 2/28/2023$323,479.00Patrick Boudreault   Gallaudet UniversityWashingtonDC20002-3600USA2017Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherDigital Humanities Advancement GrantsDigital Humanities3234790322083.530

Improvements to the technological infrastructure of the Deaf Studies Digital Journal (DSDJ) to implement a fully bilingual digital platform for use by both signers and non-signers. The project also increases access to and sustainability of DSDJ content and supports refinements to the peer review process in American Sign Language.

The Deaf Studies Digital Journal (DSDJ) is a peer-reviewed, digital journal in American Sign Language and English text dedicated to advancing the cultural, creative and critical output of work in and about sign languages and its communities. DSDJ publishes work in the form of scholarly video articles, original works of signed literature, as well as interviews, reviews, and historical resources. This project will preserve and migrate past issues of DSDJ to a new open-access, technologically sustainable platform that adheres to and advances accessibility standards in publishing through fully bilingual video and text articles, advanced interactive videos, and integration into library databases. Furthermore, the project develops innovative peer-review processes that support the exclusive use of sign language to produce the next iteration of DSDJ in an effort to transform scholarly communication.