Search Criteria

 






Key Word Search by:









Organization Type


State or Jurisdiction


Congressional District





help

Division or Office
help

Grants to:


Date Range Start


Date Range End


  • Special Searches




    Product Type


    Media Coverage Type








 


Search Results

Grant number like: PC-50024-06

Permalink for this Search

1
Page size:
 1 items in 1 pages
Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
1
Page size:
 1 items in 1 pages
PC-50024-06Preservation and Access: Grants to Preserve and Create Access to Humanities CollectionsPlaquemines Parish GovernmentFort Jackson, Louisiana: Library Artifact Stabilization HURRICANE KATRINA EMERGENCY GRANT9/1/2005 - 8/31/2007$30,000.00William Serpas   Plaquemines Parish GovernmentBelle ChasseLA70037-2710USA2006U.S. HistoryGrants to Preserve and Create Access to Humanities CollectionsPreservation and Access300000300000

Fort Jackson, built in 1822 under the recommendation of General Andrew Jackson, served as an important defense for New Orleans during the Civil War. It now serves as a museum-the only public museum in Plaquemines Parish-with free admission and a museum staff to assist both tourists and Civil War researchers. The Fort's museum collection was begun in the 1960s with artifacts found on the premises, such as Civil War and Spanish-American War artillery shells, cannon balls, smoking pipes, clothing, coins, and weapons. A large collection of local maps, blueprints, drawings, newspaper articles, and photographs were incorporated into the collection for research and reference. Plaquemines Parish was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and then again by Hurricane Rita, and Fort Jackson was under water for eight weeks. FEMA personnel and representatives of the National Park Service were able to enter the fort in November to assess the damage, recover artifacts, and inventory the collection. Most of the artifacts were recovered; however, all were covered with salt-water mud, and some were heavily corroded. Conservators with the Harpers Ferry Center in West Virginia have assessed and prioritized artifacts for treatment and would carry out the stabilization and restoration.