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Keywords: Estefanía de la Encarnación (ALL of these words -- matching substrings)

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RQ-271241-20Research Programs: Scholarly Editions and TranslationsUniversity of Wisconsin, MilwaukeeThe Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Painter and Nun, Estefanía de la Encarnación10/1/2020 - 6/30/2023$156,248.00TanyaJ.TiffanyLauraReneeBassUniversity of Wisconsin, MilwaukeeMilwaukeeWI53211-3153USA2020Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherScholarly Editions and TranslationsResearch Programs15624801562480

Preparation for publication of a bilingual scholarly edition and translation, from Spanish to English, of the only known autobiography written by a woman artist during the early modern period, Estefanía de la Encarnación (ca. 1597-1665). (21 months)

“The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Painter and Nun, Estefanía de la Encarnación” brings together an art historian and a literary scholar to make available the first known autobiography by a woman artist—a text that has never been published. We are producing a complete bilingual (English and Spanish) critical edition of the autobiography for The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe, which publishes primary sources by and about women from the period. The Vida, as the text is known, has major significance for several interlocking domains of inquiry: art history, religious history, and gender studies. The author reveals the confluence and the conflict between her painting and her spiritual devotion, raising questions about the function and limits of religious imagery at the height of the Catholic Reformation. She also provides rare insight into the training of female painters and the social pressures they faced in an age when few women were deemed capable of artistic creation.