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Keywords: Robert Lowell (ALL of these words -- matching substrings)

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BH-231287-15Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureDelta State UniversityThe Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta10/1/2015 - 12/31/2016$179,791.00Rolando Herts   Delta State UniversityClevelandMS38733-0001USA2015U.S. Regional StudiesLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs17979101797910

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the history and culture of the Mississippi Delta, with music as a focus.

The Most Southern Place on Earth: Music, History, and Culture of the Mississippi Delta was presented with NEH support in June and July of 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013, and 2014. The Most Southern Place on Earth addresses all four of the goals of the Landmarks program. It informs participants of the important role that the Mississippi Delta has played in American history, a role that is very often ignored or overlooked. Since the Delta is a place of “mean poverty and garish opulence” (according to Will Campbell), intellectual exploration of its heritage requires building a community of civility. Our approach is highly experiential and tells heritage stories at the places where they happened.

BH-50445-11Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureUniversity of Massachusetts, LowellInventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution10/1/2011 - 6/30/2013$172,880.00Sheila Kirschbaum   University of Massachusetts, LowellLowellMA01854-3629USA2011U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs17288001728800

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

"Inventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution" consists of two one-week NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops held during summer 2012 for eighty school teachers. The program is offered by the Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and the Lowell National Historical Park, and focuses on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. During the workshops, historians and other scholars lead lecture/discussions on key themes in Lowell's history. Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context; Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system; Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) talks about the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy; Gray Fitzsimons (formerly National Park Service) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French-Canadian immigrants; Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order; and Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century. Participants visit historic sites around Lowell and Concord such as Walden Pond and Minute Man National Historical Park; they also visit Old Sturbridge Village. Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. The participants read selections by historians including Thomas Dublin, Merritt Roe Smith, Jack Larkin, Patrick Malone, Chad Montrie and Brian Mitchell, and writings by Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and young women who worked in the mills.

BH-50492-12Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureUniversity of Massachusetts, LowellInventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution10/1/2012 - 6/30/2014$180,861.00Sheila Kirschbaum   University of Massachusetts, LowellLowellMA01854-3629USA2012U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs1808610177182.120

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization. This workshop focuses on Lowell, Massachusetts, the first planned industrial city in the United States, as a means to study changes in work, economics, society, culture, and the environment that occurred between 1820 and 1860. To address the key themes that a study of Lowell invites, Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) places the local textile industry in an international context, Patrick Malone (Brown University) focuses on Lowell's water power system, Jack Larkin (Old Sturbridge Village) discusses the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy, Gray Fitzsimons (GGF Historical Consultants) focuses on the textile industry's management structure and on the experience of Irish and French Canadian immigrants, Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) speaks about labor's responses to the new industrial order, Chad Montrie (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) explores the tensions between the traditional and the modern in the literature of the early nineteenth century, and Marie Frank (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) utilizes two selections (by Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler) from the NEH Picturing America portfolio to explore responses to industrialization and the American landscape. Participants directly examine Lowell's rich historic fabric such as the Suffolk Mill, the Boott Cotton Mill and Boarding House, and other mill sites along the Merrimack and Concord Rivers. Site visits to Old Sturbridge Village and the town of Concord put the industrial developments in a wider context. In addition to readings by workshop scholars, the participants read selections by historians Thomas Dublin, Patrick Malone, and Brian Mitchell; the period literature of Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne; and the writings of young women who worked in the mills. The university provides online support through Blackboard, and teachers develop lesson plans, the best of which are posted on the workshop's website.

BH-50634-14Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureUniversity of Massachusetts, LowellInventing America: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution10/1/2014 - 12/31/2015$160,286.00Sheila Kirschbaum   University of Massachusetts, LowellLowellMA01854-3629USA2014American StudiesLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs1602860158832.890

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the textile industry in Lowell, Massachusetts, as a case study of early nineteenth-century industrialization.

This workshop focuses on Lowell, Massachusetts, as a significant case study of American industrialization between 1820 and 1860. Lowell tells the story of how Yankee ingenuity meets early industrial capitalism in a traditional agricultural society and develops into a full-fledged market-based economy. A fundamental transformation of American life occurred as the result of the mobilization of women and immigrants into the work force and accompanying changes in ethnic and cultural diversity, class relations, and social mobility; new economic models and volatile markets; and the rise of labor unions and progressive movements. The workshop is organized around a set of key topics: 1) Lowell's overall significance as an industrial showplace, 2) the transformation of New England's economic and social order, 3) changes in the experience of work, 4) worker protest and organization, 5) the struggle of Lowell's community to come to terms with slavery, 6) transformation of nature as a result of industrialization, and 7) the intellectual, artistic, and literary efforts to define an "American" culture. Sheila Kirschbaum, the workshop director, assembles a group of historians with particular expertise on Lowell, including Merritt Roe Smith (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Patrick Malone (Brown University), and Thomas Kelleher (Old Sturbridge Village), and University of Massachusetts, Lowell, faculty Robert Forrant, Bridget Marshall, Jennifer Cadero-Gillette, and Gregory Fitzsimons. On Monday, participants travel to Boott Mills to examine a working water-powered turbine and complete power train, following a presentation on the industrialization of textiles in Waltham and Lowell. On Tuesday, participants visit Old Sturbridge to discuss the transition from an agrarian to a market-based economy. Participants test their skills as assembly-line workers in connection with a lecture on industry management structure and working conditions on Wednesday. A Thursday trip to Walden Pond invites further reflection on the morning lecture on Emerson and Thoreau. On the last day, participants take a walking tour to examine Lowell's immigrant history. Secondary readings for the workshop include Thomas Dublin's Lowell: The Story of an Industrial City; Patrick Malone's Waterpower in Lowell; Jack Larkin's The Reshaping of Everyday Life: 1790-1840; and Ira Berlin's Many Thousands Gone, among others.

BH-50640-14Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureCollaborative for Educational ServicesForge of Innovation: The Springfield Armory and the Genesis of American Industry10/1/2014 - 12/31/2015$168,400.00RichardD.W.Cairn   Collaborative for Educational ServicesNorthamptonMA01060-3947USA2014U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs16840001684000

For seventy-two teachers, two one-week workshops focusing on the economic development of the Connecticut River Valley over two centuries.

Established by George Washington in 1777, the Federal Armory at Springfield, Massachusetts, became an influential force for technological innovation. In the early 1800s the Armory created fully interchangeable weapons using methods that launched the U.S. precision metals industry as well as mass production in a host of industries in the Connecticut River Valley, including cutlery, sewing machines, bicycles, textiles, shoes, furniture, and paper. Directed by educator Richard Cairn, this workshop explores the leading role the Armory played in the Industrial Revolution and related social, political, and cultural transformations. In addition to the government-funded and -directed Armory, the region was also home to small-scale entrepreneurship (an economic development common to much of America), larger investor-designed transportation systems and industries, and even an abolitionist utopian community formed around producing silk as an alternative to cotton that depended on slave labor. In examining these different economic engines, teachers consider key factors such as capitalization, management systems, labor sources and labor rights, markets, transportation and systems to promote technological innovation. Participants work with collections in the Museum of Springfield History and Smith Gallery of Fine Arts, and they spend a day in Holyoke to explore aspects of what was one of the first planned industrial communities in the U.S., accompanied by Robert Forrant (University of Massachusetts, Lowell) to discuss city design and to interpret the landscape of canals and repurposed mill buildings. At Wisteriahurst in Holyoke, the teachers see the home and collections of silk manufacturer William Skinner, and contrast this with the lives of largely immigrant servants and workers. A trip to Florence focuses on the Northampton Association of Education and Industry, organized around reform movements to counter mainstream social, political, and economic structures. The Springfield Armory is visited twice: on Monday, to consider the development of the American system of manufacturing, and then on Thursday, in relation to discussions of the environmental impact of industrialism and the role of Springfield weaponry in numerous wars, including World Wars I and II. In addition to resources found on the Emerging America website, primary materials such as Longfellow's poem "The Arsenal at Springfield" and excerpts from Bellamy's Looking Backward, readings include a wide range of articles and book chapters, such as "The Wilderness Should Turn a Mart" (William Cronon), "The Literary Landscape: A Delightful Excursion" (Jill Hodnicki), "The River Gods in the Making" (Kevin Sweeney), "Arcadian Values: The Connecticut Valley in Art" (Martha Hoppins), "The American System of Manufacture in the Antebellum Period" (David Hounshell), and selections from A Place Called Paradise: Culture and Community in Northampton, Massachusetts, 1654-2004 (Kerry Buckley, ed.) and Working People of Holyoke: Class and Ethnicity in a Massachusetts Mill Town, 1850-1960 (William Hartford). The faculty includes several scholars from the history department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst: Richard Chu, David Glassberg, John Higginson, Bruce Laurie, Alice Nash, and Leonard Richards.

FA-11248-75Research Programs: Fellowships for University TeachersHoward T. YoungA Comparative-Historical Analysis of Juan Ramon Jimenez and North American Poetry7/1/1975 - 6/30/1976$8,272.00HowardT.Young   Pomona CollegeClaremontCA91711-4434USA1975American LiteratureFellowships for University TeachersResearch Programs8272082720

To make an historical-comparative study of the relationship between the modern Spanish poet Juan Ramon Jimenez and North American poetry. Sources to be utilized include unpublished translations, marginalia, letters, and miscellaneous notes; this material involves Edgar Lee Masters, E.A. Robinson, Amy Lowell, Robert Frost, and others. Project will constitute the first major study of influence of North American poetry on a key Spanish writer.

FB-11297-72Research Programs: Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsBoston CollegeModern Poets in Search of America: A Study of America as a Viable Symbol in Hart Crane, W.C. Williams, Pound, and Lowell1/1/1973 - 8/31/1973$8,750.00PaulL.Mariani   Boston CollegeChestnut HillMA02467-3800USA1972Literature, GeneralFellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsResearch Programs8750087500

To study the ways in which four major modern American poets--Hart Crane, William Carlos Williams, Ezra POund, and Robert Lowell--have interpreted their own times and defined themselves in their wirting by re-examining their roots: the american landscape, the american past.

FB-22441-84Research Programs: Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsDaniel J. GillisRobert Lowell and Classical Antiquity6/1/1984 - 1/31/1985$25,000.00DanielJ.Gillis   Haverford CollegeHaverfordPA19041-1392USA1983Classical LiteratureFellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsResearch Programs25000093970

No project description available

FE-24556-90Fellowships and Seminars: Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95Henry HartRobert Lowell and the Sublime6/1/1990 - 5/31/1991$750.00Henry Hart   College of William and MaryWilliamsburgVA23186-0002USA1990Literature, GeneralTravel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95Fellowships and Seminars75007500

No project description available

FE-25232-90Fellowships and Seminars: Travel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95Charlotte H. BeckRobert Lowell and the Fugitive Legacy6/1/1990 - 5/31/1991$750.00CharlotteH.Beck   Maryville CollegeMaryvilleTN37804-5907USA1990American LiteratureTravel to Collections, 11/85 - 2/95Fellowships and Seminars75007500

No project description available

FI-20390-86Fellowships and Seminars: Younger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95Gregory G. MachacekRobert Lowell's Poetry through Narrative Theory6/1/1986 - 8/31/1986$2,200.00GregoryG.Machacek   St. John's University, CollegevilleCollegevilleMN56321-2000USA1986American LiteratureYounger Scholars, 2/86 - 2/95Fellowships and Seminars2200022000

No project description available

FS-10096-75Education Programs: Seminars for Higher Education FacultyRice UniversityForm and Self in Poetry: Sonnets of Shakespeare and Robert Lowell1/1/1975 - 8/31/1975$38,738.00Monroe Spears   Rice UniversityHoustonTX77005-1827USA1974American LiteratureSeminars for Higher Education FacultyEducation Programs387380387380

To conduct a seminar on the relation between the form of poetry and the concept of a "Self" (conscious and unconscious) expressed in it. The primary texts will be Shakespeare's Sonnets and Lowell's History supplemented by his other sequences.

FS-10580-76Education Programs: Seminars for Higher Education FacultyMonroe SpearsForm and Self in Poetry: Sonnets of Shakespeare: Robert Lowell1/1/1978 - 9/30/1978$50,440.00Monroe Spears   Rice UniversityHoustonTX77005-1827USA1976Literature, GeneralSeminars for Higher Education FacultyEducation Programs504400504400

To conduct a seminar on the relation between the forms of poetry and the concept of a "Self" (conscious and unconscious) expressed in it. The primary texts will be Shakespeare's Sonnets and Lowell's History supplemented by his other sequences.

FT-*0847-80Research Programs: Summer StipendsRichard W. TillinghastRobert Lowell: Biographical Study5/1/1980 - 9/30/1980$2,500.00RichardW.Tillinghast    SewaneeTN37375USA1980Literature, GeneralSummer StipendsResearch Programs2500025000

No project description available

FT-11260-72Research Programs: Summer StipendsPresident and Board of Trustees of Santa Clara CollegeModern American Poetry7/1/1972 - 9/30/1972$2,000.00JamesS.Torrens   President and Board of Trustees of Santa Clara CollegeSanta ClaraCA95053-0001USA1972Literature, GeneralSummer StipendsResearch Programs2000020000

A study of Robert Lowell a a translator and imitator of poems, and a study of experiments of American poets with loose rhythmical forms.

GN-22094-84Public Programs: Humanities Projects in MediaNew York Center for Visual HistoryVoices & Visions: The World and Work of American Poets (Scripting: TV Documentary)10/1/1984 - 6/30/1986$150,000.00Lawrence Pitkethly   New York Center for Visual HistoryNew YorkNY10013-3152USA1984American LiteratureHumanities Projects in MediaPublic Programs15000001500000

To support the scripting for three individual one-hour television documentarieson American poets Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and Robert Lowell and a one-hour composite program on Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Robert Hayden.

GN-23061-87Public Programs: Humanities Projects in MediaNew York Center for Visual HistoryVoices and Visions: The Work and World of American Poets4/1/1987 - 4/30/1988$500,123.00Lawrence Pitkethly   New York Center for Visual HistoryNew YorkNY10013-3152USA1987American LiteratureHumanities Projects in MediaPublic Programs123500000123500000

To support the production of three 60-minute documentary films on T.S. Eliot, Robert Lowell, and Sylvia Plath as part of a 13-part series on the world and work of American poets.

GY-20563-82Public Programs: Younger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85William J. HourihanA Study of the Evolution of the Work of Robert Lowell5/1/1982 - 8/31/1982$2,370.00WilliamJ.Hourihan   Unaffiliated Independent ScholarWellesley HillsMA02181USA1981American LiteratureYounger Scholars, 2/76 - 2/85Public Programs2370023700

To support research and preparation of an article and a radio script on the relationship of mental illness to an artist's perception and creativity, through a study of the work and unpublished papers of poet Robert Lowell.

RA-50050-07Research Programs: Fellowship Programs at Independent Research InstitutionsNewberry LibraryNEH Fellowships at the Newberry Library7/1/2007 - 8/31/2010$252,000.00Daniel Greene   Newberry LibraryChicagoIL60610-3305USA2007Interdisciplinary Studies, GeneralFellowship Programs at Independent Research InstitutionsResearch Programs25200002520000

Three fellowships a year for two years.

This proposal requests funding for three years of publicity and three years of fellowships to continue a highly successful program of residential humanities fellowships at the Newberry Library. Over three decades, this program has generated a rich and documented harvest of humanities scholarship while serving as a catalyst for the creation of a dynamic intellectual community within this research institution. The proposal details the achievements and impact of the program and outlines the library's procedures for publicity, selection, and orientation of fellows.

RQ-50245-07Research Programs: Scholarly Editions and TranslationsPhilip KelleyThe Brownings' Correspondence: Volumes 17-197/1/2007 - 6/30/2009$210,000.00Philip Kelley   Baylor UniversityWacoTX76798-7284USA2007British LiteratureScholarly Editions and TranslationsResearch Programs1600005000016000050000

Preparation of annotation for 408 letters (1851-1853) comprising volumes 17-19 of the correspondence of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 19th-century British poets. (36 months)

The letters of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, scattered in over 300 public and private collections, represent one of the largest and most comprehensive bodies of literary and social commentary on the nineteenth century. The aim of The Brownings' Correspondence, projected to be 40 volumes, is to publish the complete text of all the poets' letters with full annotations, thereby making them accessible to a modern audience. This application requests three-year funding to edit volumes 17 through 19 of the edition, covering the years 1851-1853. During this period, the Brownings and their correspondents discuss a wide range of social, political and cultural subjects including Austrian occupation in Italy, the coup d'etat in France, American slavery, women's rights, and spiritualism. The letters in these volumes also serve to illuminate the work of both poets: RB's introductory essay to the Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley (1852); EBB's Casa Guidi Windows (1851) and Poems (1853).