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123
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 113 items in 3 pages
Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
123
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 113 items in 3 pages
AC-277694-21Education Programs: Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving InstitutionsUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraHidden Archives: Race, Gender, and Religion in UCSB’s Ballitore Collection2/1/2021 - 12/31/2022$149,402.00RachaelScarboroughKingDanielleL.SprattUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraCA93106-0001USA2020British LiteratureHumanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving InstitutionsEducation Programs1494020132405.310

A two-year project on the digitization and examination of abolitionist materials to be included in experiential learning and curriculum development.

Hidden Archives is a collaborative project between the University of California, Santa Barbara, California State University-Northridge, and Howard University that digitizes and researches a collection of abolitionist materials held at UCSB while introducing underrepresented students to archival research and the digital humanities. Although both archival and digital skills are necessary to address crucial topics regarding the history of race, enslavement, and protest, the fields of book history and the digital humanities remain exclusionary to scholars of color. Hidden Archives addresses such concerns through collaborative research between faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students. The project focuses on the Ballitore Collection, a group of 18th- and 19th-century Quaker materials. By examining the collection with a diverse research team, we make it available for scholars, students, and the public while shaping a generation of researchers attuned to questions of power and absence.

BH-50600-13Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsFairfield UniversityDuke Ellington and American Popular Culture10/1/2013 - 12/31/2014$177,340.00LauraR.Nash   Fairfield UniversityFairfieldCT06824-5195USA2013Film History and CriticismLandmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs1773400169164.740

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on Duke Ellington and his world. This workshop illuminates the life and music of Duke Ellington (1899-1974) in cultural and historical context, using eight compositions (including "Mood Indigo" and "Take the 'A' Train") as "anchor works" for the week's study. Under the direction of music professor Laura Nash, participants engage with Ellington's work and his world through lectures, discussions, hands-on musical participation, and two all-day visits to historic and cultural sites in New York City. Taking the A train to Harlem, participants visit the Sugar Hill Historic District, where Ellington lived, and are guided on a private tour of the National Jazz Museum by Executive Director Loren Schoenberg. The second day trip to New York features the resources of Jazz at Lincoln Center with curator Phil Schaap. Participants explore the role of Ellington's radio and television broadcasts at the Paley Media Center with Jim Shanahan (Boston University) and learn about Ellington's long form music at Carnegie Hall, where "Black, Brown, and Beige" premiered in 1943. A jazz show at Birdland Jazz Club and a performance of swing dance music conclude the day visits to New York. In Fairfield, historian and director of Black Studies Yohuru Williams provides relevant grounding in twentieth-century African-American history and addresses intersections of race and popular culture. During the days on campus, music professor and bassist Brian Torff leads a specially assembled live big band in presentations and performances to give participants direct experience with the anchor works and with improvisation, as well as opportunities for discussion with band members. Workshop guest faculty include jazz critic and journalist Gary Giddins; educator and composer David Berger (Juilliard), who transcribed and edited the majority of Ellington's works; and Monsignor John Sanders, trombonist and librarian for the Ellington Orchestra, who shares his first-hand knowledge of playing, working, and traveling with Ellington, and of developing the Ellington archives. Prior to and during the workshop, participants read Ellington's Music is My Mistress; Harvey Cohen's Duke Ellington's America; John Edward Hasse's Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington; and Mark Tucker's The Duke Ellington Reader. They also have access to a password-protected website with Ellington recordings, sheet music, and video clips.

CH-50421-07Challenge Programs: Challenge GrantsAmerican Musicological Society, Inc.Publishing Musicologal Research in the 21st Century12/1/2005 - 7/31/2011$240,000.00AnneW.Robertson   American Musicological Society, Inc.New YorkNY10012-1502USA2006Music History and CriticismChallenge GrantsChallenge Programs02400000240000

Endowment for publication subventions and an award program in musicology as well as fund-raising costs.

The American Musicological Society seeks an NEH challenge grant of $240,000, which with a 4:1 match will yield $1,200,000. These funds will endow four publication-related initiatives of the Society. The bulk of the funds ($900,000) will create a new subvention supporting the publication of first books by young scholars, whose work often represents the cutting edge of scholarly research, but whose careers are often at their most fragile or challenging point. The remainder will go primarily to existing publication subvention programs, supporting musicological books more generally ($125,000) as well as a monograph series sponsored by the Society ($100,000). These subventions aim to optimize the quality of the best scholarly books on music while keeping their prices affordable. Finally, we propose a new award for books on music in American culture ($50,000), a vital area of musical research that appeals to the broadest literary and musical public.

CZ-50300-13Challenge Programs: Special InitiativesMontgomery CollegeProposal to Launch an Institute for Global Humanities Initiatives and Program to Internationalize the Humanities Curriculum9/1/2011 - 7/31/2018$490,000.00Rita Kranidis   Montgomery CollegeRockvilleMD20850-1728USA2012Interdisciplinary Studies, GeneralSpecial InitiativesChallenge Programs0490000-485.64490000

Endowment and a spend-down fund for an Institute for Global Humanities Initiatives.

Seeking new ways to engage and retain students, Montgomery College seeks $500,000 in Challenge Grant funds to revitalize its humanities programs and implement an Institute for Global Humanities Initiatives, responding to the Endowment-wide Bridging Cultures theme. The Institute, under the leadership of a distinguished faculty member and with guidance from a board of global humanities experts, will serve as the locus for a series of dynamic new learning initiatives in the humanities, including a faculty development program in Internationalizing the Humanities Curriculum, intentionally designed to expand scholarly and public discourse of diverse countries, peoples, and cultural and intellectual traditions worldwide. The College will match the federal funds two-to-one, raising $1,000,000 over the six-year grant period, for a total budget of $1.5 million. A six-year spend-down fund and endowment will be created to launch the Institute and its activities with comprehensive force and scope.

EH-261656-18Education Programs: Institutes for Higher Education FacultyUniversity of TampaJosé Martí and the Immigrant Communities of Florida in Cuban Independence and the Dawn of the American Century10/1/2018 - 12/31/2019$190,238.00JamesJosephLopezDenisAlbertoReyUniversity of TampaTampaFL33606-1450USA2018Immigration HistoryInstitutes for Higher Education FacultyEducation Programs1902380171771.490

A four-week institute for 30 college and university faculty on José Martí and the immigrant communities of Florida.

The proposed 4-week Summer Institute seeks to heighten awareness of how American immigrant communities have helped usher in political transformations both at home and abroad, and to accentuate the rich and complex cultural world established by the Cuban, Sicilian and Spanish immigrants around the cigar industry in turn-of-the-century Florida. An important and often overlooked aspect of that community was its political activism both domestically, in the struggle for labor and immigrant rights, and internationally, as a crucial component of the organization and funding of the War for Cuban Independence under the leadership of Jose Marti, and the U.S. intervention in that war, an event that would transform both countries. The immigrant communities of Tampa, Ybor City and Key West, and the role they played in this history, constitute an extraordinary chrysalis in which to observe and understand the geopolitical evolution of the U.S. in the early 20th century.

EH-50424-14Education Programs: Institutes for Higher Education FacultyDrexel UniversityTeaching the History of Modern Design: The Canon and Beyond10/1/2014 - 12/31/2015$192,914.00David Raizman   Drexel UniversityPhiladelphiaPA19104-2875USA2014Art History and CriticismInstitutes for Higher Education FacultyEducation Programs19291401929140

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five college and university faculty on teaching the history of modern design.

The Canon and Beyond: Teaching the History of Modern Design is a four week summer teaching institute designed to prepare a diverse group of college faculty to meet an increasing demand to teach courses on the topic. The Institute is organized into three thematic units whose subjects address significant components of introductory courses in modern design history, from the early 19th century through the 1970s. The Institute Director will first present material to ground participants in foundational material that is typically covered in a survey course in design history. Then, a select group of visiting scholars will each lead in-depth seminars on a specific topic related to the thematic units, coinciding with their field of research and expertise. These complementary approaches will build and reinforce familiarity with standard material and major themes in the field, on the one hand, and introduce new material and critical perspectives.

FB-51699-05Research Programs: Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsDaniel A. NathanThe Story of the Baltimore Black Sox and the 1929 American Negro League Pennant7/1/2005 - 6/30/2006$40,000.00DanielA.Nathan   Skidmore CollegeSaratoga SpringsNY12866-1698USA2004U.S. HistoryFellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsResearch Programs400000400000

My project is a history of the Baltimore Black Sox and its 1929 pennant-winning season. Although interest in Negro league baseball has steadily increased for the last thirty years, teams like the Black Sox have largely faded from memory and been ignored by history. This project, a microhistory and a meditation on cultural memory and our ability to know the past, retells the stories of forgotten men who were simultaneously ordinary and remarkable. It uses a specific event to illustrate and reflect on African-American cultural history, local race relations, politics, business practices, and social life, and the ways in which the past can be reconstructed.

FB-57615-14Research Programs: Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsLester TomeCuban Ballet, Cosmopolitan Dancers, and Nationalist Gestures: A Study in Ballet and Globalization6/1/2014 - 5/31/2015$50,400.00Lester Tome   Trustees of Smith CollegeNorthamptonMA01060-2916USA2013Dance History and CriticismFellowships for College Teachers and Independent ScholarsResearch Programs504000504000

My study of ballet in Cuba is an effort toward writing a global history of the art. It documents the history of the Cuban ballet since the 1960s and elucidates how local dancers have adapted ballet, an art commonly equated with European culture, social elites, white bodies and homosexuality, to the ideology of a nationalist proletarian regime that has promoted racial democracy and homophobic discourse. It examines the aesthetics of choreography that integrates Afro-Cuban folklore, and of a dancing style that reflects the musical and expressive sensibilities of Cuban culture. Also, it analyzes how local dancers contest alleged notions of a center and a periphery in the international ballet establishment. This research illuminates the intersection between ballet, culture and politics; explains cosmopolitan, nationalist and postcolonial trends in Cuba's cultural production; and contributes knowledge of the history and transformation of ballet beyond European and Euro-American contexts.

FEL-263155-19Research Programs: FellowshipsTamba M'bayoSierra Leone’s History of Epidemics, 1787- 20157/1/2020 - 6/30/2021$60,000.00Tamba M'bayo   West Virginia University Research CorporationMorgantownWV26506-6201USA2018African HistoryFellowshipsResearch Programs600000600000

A book-length study about the history of epidemic disease in Sierra Leone between 1787 and 2015.

This funding request is for financial support during the writing phase of my second book-length study titled “From ‘White Man’s Grave’ to Ebola Makona: Sierra Leone’s History of Epidemics, 1787- 2015.” With archival research to be completed this summer, writing the manuscript will be during my sabbatical leave in the 2019-20 academic year. The monograph aims to locate the 2013 Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic in the longue durée of disease outbreaks in Sierra Leone. The main thrust of the book’s argument is that the colonial discourse through which Sierra Leone and the rest of West Africa emerged as a “diseased environment” is too simplistic to explain the complex cultural, social, political, and economic landscape in which disease outbreaks have been recurrent for over two centuries. Although conceived as a history book, the study brings together insights from multiple disciplines by engaging history, public health, cultural and ecological studies.

FEL-267650-20Research Programs: FellowshipsLorrin Reed ThomasLatinos, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Making of Multiracial America After the 1960s7/1/2020 - 6/30/2021$60,000.00LorrinReedThomas   Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, CamdenCamdenNJ08102-1405USA2019Latino HistoryFellowshipsResearch Programs600000600000

Research and writing leading to a book on the Latino involvement in the Civil Rights Movement between 1968 and 1984.

Minority: Latinos and the Making of Multiracial America after the 1960s offers a full account of Latinos’ centrality to the struggles over law and policy that reconfigured American society after the 1960s. The book will argue that Latino activism and leadership contributed substantially to the outcome of major domestic conflicts and debates during the long decade of the 1970s: battles over school desegregation and busing, political redistricting, affirmative action in employment, and access to higher education, as well as ongoing protests against police brutality and disagreements over the causes of growing urban poverty. The real impact of the major changes that took shape in American society during the 1970s--the coda to the conventionally-defined civil rights movement--cannot be understood without expanding this national story to incorporate Latinos as central historical actors.

FT-254705-17Research Programs: Summer StipendsAllison LangeThe Visual Politics of the Woman Suffrage Movement from American Independence through the Nineteenth Amendment5/1/2017 - 6/30/2017$6,000.00Allison Lange   Wentworth Institute of TechnologyBostonMA02115-5901USA2017U.S. HistorySummer StipendsResearch Programs6000060000

A book-length study about the strategic use of images in the woman suffrage movement from the 1780s through 1920.

Images of Change will be the first book to demonstrate the centrality of visual politics—the strategic use of images to promote a cause or candidate—to US woman’s rights campaigns from the late 18th century through 1920, when the 19th Amendment granted women suffrage. Reformers used images to contest women’s relationships with the state, while opponents used them to reinforce existing ones. In response to pictures satirizing political women as masculine threats to society, suffragists changed their public image with visual campaigns that laid the foundations for modern ones. I analyze the visual and historical contexts of popular public images, ranging from engraved cartoons and photographic portraits to the earliest newspaper halftones and colorful propaganda posters. My work expands on recent studies of race, pictures, and politics by focusing on gender. This book and exhibition will promote a better understanding of the gendered political images that still spark public debates.

FT-270920-20Research Programs: Summer StipendsLeah VonderheideCinema of Indigenous Maori Filmmaker and Actress Merata Mita (1942-2010)6/1/2020 - 7/31/2020$6,000.00Leah Vonderheide   Oberlin CollegeOberlinOH44074-1057USA2020Film History and CriticismSummer StipendsResearch Programs6000060000

Research and writing leading to a book about Maori filmmaker Merata Mita (1942-2010) and her film and television work in New Zealand over three decades, from the context of global cinema and feminist film practice.

Maori filmmaker Merata Mita was a leader in the film and television industry of Aotearoa New Zealand (and beyond) for over three decades. This project considers her body of work in its entirety, revisiting her groundbreaking documentaries such as Bastion Point and Patu!, and connecting the filmmaker’s cinema to her later works on self-determination and social justice. Exploring Mita’s myriad on-screen roles alongside her early collaborative projects, this study also considers why, and demonstrates how, some of Mita’s contributions to the global cinema of Indigenous Peoples – often deemed the “fourth cinema” – are overlooked. By acknowledging the role of “women’s work” in the film and media industries worldwide, and engaging the canon of fourth cinema as a mode of exhibition as well as a category of production, this project argues that not only are Mita’s works a reflection of the core values of Maori culture, they also contribute to a growing feminist fourth cinema.

FT-53223-05Research Programs: Summer StipendsCurrie Kerr ThompsonPerón and Argentine Cinema, 1943-19556/1/2005 - 8/31/2005$5,000.00CurrieKerrThompson   Gettysburg CollegeGettysburgPA17325-1483USA2005Film History and CriticismSummer StipendsResearch Programs5000050000

My project will examine Argentine cinema between 1943, when a coup brought Perón to power, and 1955, when he was removed from office. It will study cases of censorship and of blacklistings, identifying the political and personal motives behind them, and will evaluate the impact of labor legislation on filmmaking. It will also trace new aesthetic trends in films, such as a growing interest in psychological cinema and an emulation of neorealism, and will identify methods directors used to circumvent government resistance to these trends. Finally, it will analyze, in the context of Perón’s government’s policies, the transformation of the ways movies portray labor, education, poverty, wealth, and various social groups, including women and blacks.

FT-54692-06Research Programs: Summer StipendsCatherine Alice Jessica MolineuxThe Peripheries Within: Race, Slavery, and Empire in Early Modern England.5/1/2006 - 6/30/2006$5,000.00CatherineAlice JessicaMolineux   Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleTN37203-2416USA2006British HistorySummer StipendsResearch Programs5000050000

"The Peripheries Within" analyzes visual and literary representations of black slaves produced in early modern England as a lens into popular beliefs about race, slavery, and empire from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries. The NEH summer grant would be used to complete a book chapter (“Ideologies of Mastery: Slavery, Empire, and Virtue in Pre-Abolitionist Britain”) which will reconstruct public debates over slavery in English and Scottish journals from the 1690s to the 1770s. This chapter will provide a badly needed pre-history to the abolitionist movement. It will be the basis for an article and several conference papers.

FT-57486-10Research Programs: Summer StipendsJacqueline FoertschSidebar: Covering the Bomb in the African American Press5/1/2010 - 9/30/2010$6,000.00Jacqueline Foertsch   University of North TexasDentonTX76203-5017USA2010American LiteratureSummer StipendsResearch Programs6000060000

This chapter will examine coverage of the atom bomb in the African American press between the years 1945 and 1962. Always in search of the relevant angle on topics it covered, the black press hailed Manhattan Project scientists from its own community, exposed discrimination in the atomic workplace, blamed the bomb for too-rapidly ending the war (and the many jobs it had created), and both accepted and protested the atomic vanquishing of Japan. It railed against segregated preparedness policy (including the prospect of whites-only bomb shelters and evacuation plans) and hailed integrated anti-nuclear protest. It drew upon the rhetorical power of atomic imagery whenever suitable -- for instance, the beloved baseball superstar Jackie Robinson had "atomic" impact -- and read the Soviet Union's success with nuclear technology (its first bomb detonation in 1949, its Sputnik launch in 1957) as a necessary corrective to the white West's arrogant, imperialist mindset.

FT-61703-14Research Programs: Summer StipendsLane DemasSports, Race, and American Culture: A History of African Americans in Golf5/1/2014 - 6/30/2014$6,000.00Lane Demas   Central Michigan UniversityMount PleasantMI48859-0001USA2014Cultural HistorySummer StipendsResearch Programs6000060000

The Game of Privilege will be the definitive history of golf in the African American community -- a book that does not exist and one that would be valuable to both humanities scholars and the general public. A cultural history of race and golf placed within the broader context of American history since the late nineteenth century, the book will explore the game's rise alongside events such as the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, and the postwar civil rights movement. Along the way, it will illuminate the stories of individuals who appropriated the movement's shifting rhetoric not only to access schools and voting booths but also to participate in America's most privileged sport. The book will provide significant insight into how race, class, and leisure impacted African American history and the quest for civil rights, as well as the surprising ways in which black people have deeply influenced golf's development since 1880.

FT-62152-14Research Programs: Summer StipendsLiette GidlowBlack Women's Disfranchisement and the Fight for Voting Rights, 1920-19455/1/2014 - 6/30/2014$6,000.00Liette Gidlow   Wayne State UniversityDetroitMI48201-1347USA2014Women's HistorySummer StipendsResearch Programs6000060000

I propose to work full-time during the grant period to complete a submission-ready manuscript of a journal article on the disfranchisement of African American women in the southern U.S. between 1920 and 1945. This project begins a radical reinterpretation of the constitutional amendment long heralded as the single greatest expansion of democracy in U.S. history. My research indicates that though the 19th Amendment nearly doubled the size of the electorate overnight, a great many women of color and poor women remained in effect disfranchised for decades because opponents, motivated by beliefs in white supremacy and male supremacy and sometimes also by partisan considerations, used Jim Crow tactics, poll taxes, and plain intimidation and violence to block these women from the polls. Though the 19th Amendment officially granted women the right to vote in 1920, it took decades of continued struggle and mobilization before many women were able in fact to freely cast ballots.

FZ-250607-17Research Programs: Public ScholarsDarren DochukAnointed With Oil: God and Black Gold in America's Century7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018$50,400.00Darren Dochuk   University of Notre DameNotre DameIN46556-4635USA2016U.S. HistoryPublic ScholarsResearch Programs504000504000

A history of the connections between religion and the petroleum industry in the U.S., from the “King of Crude” Patillo Higgins in the 1890s to the Rockefeller and Pew families in the energy crisis of the 1970s to the current era of globalization.

This project examines the subtle but critical relationship between petroleum and religion in the twentieth century, with focus on the United States, its oil-patch regions, and their change over time, but also on the expansion of American oil-patch interests and influences abroad. Blending cultural, political, and economic history, it details and assesses how those living in oil-rich zones have always considered petroleum their special providence, a fragile gift bestowed by God to be used industriously for the advance of “His Kingdom.” Driven by sacred notions of production, stewardship, and dominion over the earth, they have long found a natural ally in the petroleum business, which has grafted these ideals onto an ideology of high-risk, high-reward wildcat entrepreneurialism. This marriage has spawned structures of power with sweeping impact, domestically and globally, and transformed American religion, politics, and culture in profound and lasting ways.

FZ-261342-18Research Programs: Public ScholarsTom DunkelWhite Knights in the Black Orchestra: A True Story of the Nazi Resistance1/1/2019 - 12/31/2019$60,000.00Tom Dunkel    WashingtonDC20003-1613USA2018JournalismPublic ScholarsResearch Programs600000600000

Research leading to publication of a monograph on a Nazi resistance group that included German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945). 

My project is a book-in-progress under contract with a publisher. This is not biography or military history. I'm writing a narrative nonfiction book geared to a mainstream American audience; an audience largely unaware of one of the great stories of the Nazi resistance. My focus is the years 1938-1945 and a small group of conspirators primarily based at Abwehr, the German foreign intelligence service. Their goal is to obstruct and, hopefully, destroy the Third Reich from within, if necessary by killing Adolf Hitler. The main protagonists are pastor-turned-resister Dietrich Bonhoeffer, his brother-in-law and Abwehr attorney Hans von Dohnanyi, and Admiral Wilhem Canaris, head of Abwehr. This is a story of personal courage in the face of collective tyranny; of inescapable but dangerous moral choices. As Martin Luther King, Jr. noted, "If your opponent has a conscience, then follow Gandhi and non-violence. But if your enemy has no conscience like Hitler, then follow Bonhoeffer."

FZ-266901-19Research Programs: Public ScholarsTheresa RunstedtlerBlack Ball: Rethinking the "Dark Ages" of Professional Basketball12/1/2019 - 8/31/2020$45,000.00Theresa Runstedtler   American UniversityWashingtonDC20016-8200USA2019African American StudiesPublic ScholarsResearch Programs450000450000

Research and writing leading to a book for a popular audience on the history of race, labor, and the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the 1970s.

Playing on the multiple meanings of the expression “Black Ball,” my book recasts the history of the NBA’s “Dark Ages.” According to popular wisdom, the league’s waning profitability and popularity in the seventies was the fault of a new generation of immature, selfish, lazy, and greedy Black players who came to dominate the professional ranks. Only after white league executives and team owners regained control did the NBA rebound in the 1980s. However, the actual history is much more complicated. It is also more revealing about the ongoing significance of anti-Black racism in U.S. sport and society in the post-Civil Rights era. Combining narrative history and cultural analysis, Black Ball argues that the misnamed “Dark Ages” were pivotal years in the rise of the NBA as a profitable powerhouse, thanks largely to the efforts of Black players in fighting for greater compensation and control over their labor and in reshaping the game with aesthetics and ethics of urban Black streetball.

FZ-271344-20Research Programs: Public ScholarsChristopher M. BellittoHumility: The Secret History of a Lost Virtue6/1/2021 - 12/31/2021$35,000.00ChristopherM.Bellitto   Kean UniversityUnionNJ07083-7133USA2020Intellectual HistoryPublic ScholarsResearch Programs350000325000

Research and writing of a book on the idea of humility in world literature, religion, philosophy, mythology, and theater. 

My goal is to write an accessible history of humility to get a wide conversation going about how to recover a healthy sense of this virtue for our divided society. Research for this interdisciplinary project is complete due to two internal release-time grants at my institution. Primary and secondary texts included humility in ancient world literature; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim scriptures and sermons; eastern and western ethics and philosophy; mythology and theatre (Greeks through medieval morality plays); and Enlightenment and contemporary discussions on education in virtue and citizenship. I tracked how the virtue of humility came to be denigrated as the vice of humiliation. That misconception has often led to the dangers of hybris, arrogance, and narcissism, especially among decision makers in civic society, which dovetails with the NEH initiative, “A More Perfect Union.” Exploring the history of humility just might prove to be our path back to civility in public discourse.

GA-276338-20Public Programs: Cooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Public Programs)ALASupport for Library Humanities Programming in the Covid Era6/15/2020 - 8/31/2021$300,000.00Deborah Robertson   ALAChicagoIL60611-2729USA2020Literature, GeneralCooperative Agreements and Special Projects (Public Programs)Public Programs30000002781080

Retention of nine staff members of the American Library Association’s Public Programming Office.

The American Library Association’s (ALA) Public Programs Office (PPO) requests $300,000 in NEH CARES relief funding to support continued efforts in four key areas for work: professional development and peer-sharing; development of future humanities projects; professional recognition; and measurement and evaluation. ALA PPO’s nine-person staff collaborates with librarians, humanities scholars, artists and documentarians, scientists and financial literacy experts, museums, and others to create and scale nationwide programming opportunities, grants, and traveling exhibitions for U.S. libraries, and to offer professional development, recognition, and research that supports the vital work of programming librarians. NEH CARES support will help ALA continue serving libraries and librarians, sustaining and growing their efforts to provide humanities programming and content during this critical time and on the other side of the COVID-19 crisis.

GG-280428-21Public Programs: Humanities DiscussionsUniversity of ScrantonScranton's Story, Our Nation's Story9/1/2021 - 12/31/2023$152,791.00Julie Cohen   University of ScrantonScrantonPA18510-2429USA2021Public HistoryHumanities DiscussionsPublic Programs15279101527910

Implementation of a public discussion series addressing Scranton and U.S. history as they relate to questions of national identity and citizenship.

“Scranton’s Story, Our Nation’s Story” explores the aspirational journey to fulfill our national ideals through the lens of Scranton, Pennsylvania, an iconic American city that has experienced many of the key elements of our nation’s experience: industrial era growth and decline, waves of immigration past and present, and Black and Indigenous experiences. Programs in a variety of scholarly and participatory formats, and across eight themes related to history, philosophy, English/literature, and religious studies, will engage a diverse group of Scrantonians in humanities-based conversations and story-sharing about founding debates, local and national identity, and our role as citizens in a democracy.

GI-234952-16Public Programs: America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation GrantsKemper and Leila Williams Foundation, Inc.Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1808 to 18655/1/2016 - 12/31/2018$282,190.00Jessica Dorman   Kemper and Leila Williams Foundation, Inc.New OrleansLA70130-2179USA2016U.S. HistoryAmerica's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation GrantsPublic Programs2221906000022219060000

Implementation of a traveling exhibition with artifacts, a panel exhibition, an exhibition guide, and related public programs on the domestic slave trade from 1808 to 1865.

The Historic New Orleans Collection (THNOC) is honored to propose Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1808 to 1865, a multifaceted project exploring the history of the domestic slave trade from the abolition of the international trade in 1808 to the close of the Civil War. Purchased Lives provides resources for understanding the profound impact of the trade on the millions of enslaved individuals who found themselves forcibly separated from their communities and examines New Orleans’s role as the country’s largest and most profitable slave market. Comprising a traveling exhibition with original artifacts; an illustrated catalog; a slate of related public programs; and a facsimile-based panel exhibition, this important project will engage local, regional, and national audiences in exploring how slavery and the domestic slave trade has shaped American society.

GI-269725-20Public Programs: Exhibitions: ImplementationMuseum of the American RevolutionWhen Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story, 1776-18076/1/2020 - 6/30/2021$100,000.00Philip Mead   Museum of the American RevolutionPhiladelphiaPA19106-2818USA2020Women's HistoryExhibitions: ImplementationPublic Programs10000001000000

Implementation of a temporary exhibition, educational materials, a website, and related public programs exploring women’s citizenship and voting rights in the Early Republic. 

When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story 1776 – 1807 examines the little-known history of the nation’s first women voters—the New Jersey women who legally held the vote more than 100 years before the Nineteenth Amendment granted American women the franchise. Based on newly discovered poll lists and using original objects, digital interactives, and physical environments, the exhibition asks what new possibilities the Revolution created for women’s political activism. It explains how hope faltered amid rising partisanship, racism, and class tension as New Jersey closed the vote to all but propertied white men in 1807, yet, also how the Revolutionary promise rose again a generation later as suffragists drew inspiration from these early women voters. Timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the passage of women’s suffrage, the exhibition encourages visitors to consider that progress is not always linear, but that preserving rights and liberties requires constant vigilance.

"The Museum is planning for a partial reopening in August before we reopen to the public in September.
We anticipate limiting onsite visitation for the foreseeable future, including the cancellation of most
school groups visits and large group tours in spring 2021.
When Women Lost the Vote will open to the public on October 3 and will run through April 30, 2021.
Previously planned for the Museum’s special exhibit space, When Women Lost the Vote will be integrated
within the Museum’s core galleries, featuring newly installed historic objects and a new tableau scene,
and connected by an audio tour. It will also be made globally accessible to virtual visitors through a
robust online experience that will go live in September. An exhibition catalogue will also be published in
spring 2021.
The digital experience and many of the enhancements to the Museum’s core galleries will remain
permanently accessible for visitors.
Disseminating exhibition content across multiple formats will provide a flexible model for visitor
engagement. It will ensure broad public access to the exhibition, capitalizing on surging public interest in
the Museum’s virtual content, and accommodate onsite safety protocols in the galleries after reopening."

GI-271419-20Public Programs: Exhibitions: ImplementationYiddish Book CenterYiddish: A Global Culture9/1/2020 - 10/31/2023$200,000.00David Mazower   Yiddish Book CenterAmherstMA01002-3375USA2020Jewish StudiesExhibitions: ImplementationPublic Programs20000002000000

Implementation of a permanent exhibition of Yiddish language and culture from the late nineteenth century to the present.

The year 2020 will be the Yiddish Book Center’s fortieth anniversary. To mark the occasion, we are creating the world’s first permanent exhibit to explore the extraordinary range of literature, theater and music created in Yiddish since the late 19th century. Yiddish: A Global Culture will illuminate this vibrant and cosmopolitan world through a rich mix of photographs, historic objects and the Center’s unparalleled collections of Yiddish books. Most Jewish museums treat Yiddish culture as a marginal phenomenon. By contrast, our exhibition will place it at the heart of the modern Jewish story - a sophisticated, transnational culture that has continued reinventing itself into the present day. We will show women as prominent creators and consumers of this culture, and the importance of migration and exile as formative experiences for both writers and readers. Using the vast resources of the Center’s physical holdings, as well as our digital collections of audio recordings, oral histories

GI-287686-22Public Programs: Exhibitions: ImplementationNew Orleans Museum of ArtBlack Orpheus: Jacob Lawrence and the Mbari Club9/1/2022 - 10/31/2023$300,000.00Lisa Rotondo-McCord   New Orleans Museum of ArtNew OrleansLA70179-0123USA2022Art History and CriticismExhibitions: ImplementationPublic Programs30000003000000

Implementation of a traveling exhibition on the artistic exchange between African American artist Jacob Lawrence and West African artists during Lawrence’s travels to Nigeria in the 1960s.

Black Orpheus: Jacob Lawrence & the Mbari Club is a traveling exhibition jointly organized by the Chrysler Museum of Art and the New Orleans Museum of Art that highlights an under-researched body of work by the African American artist Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000), and celebrates the little-known creative exchange that occurred between Lawrence and his West African-based contemporaries during the 1960s. Lawrence’s travels to Nigeria in 1962 and 1964 occurred just a few years after Nigerian independence, when the citizens were embracing self-governance and developing the strategies to present a modern Nigeria to the world. The arts—music, literature, and drama—contributed forcefully to this sense of self-determination. The exhibition also explores his relationship with the Mbari Artists and Writers Club, an organization of continental African-based artists, writers, and dramatists promoting modern African artistic practice, and the Club's arts journal publication Black Orpheus.

GM-50127-03Public Programs: Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical OrganizationsCincinnati Museum CenterJames Presley Ball: 19th-Century African American Photographer9/1/2003 - 8/31/2004$10,000.00JohnE.Fleming   Cincinnati Museum CenterCincinnatiOH45203-1118USA2003U.S. HistoryHumanities Projects in Museums and Historical OrganizationsPublic Programs100000100000

Consultation with scholars to develop two temporary and two traveling exhibitions examining the life and work of James Presley Ball, a free black photographer and abolitionist.

GM-50448-05Public Programs: Humanities Projects in Museums and Historical OrganizationsCincinnati Museum CenterJames Presley Ball, 19th-Century Photographer: An Exhibition Project on His Life and Work4/1/2005 - 6/30/2006$40,000.00JohnE.Fleming   Cincinnati Museum CenterCincinnatiOH45203-1118USA2005U.S. HistoryHumanities Projects in Museums and Historical OrganizationsPublic Programs400000400000

Planning of two traveling exhibitions with a catalog and public and school programs about African American photographer James Presley Ball as artist, entrepreneur, and abolitionist.

This project is a multi-museum collaboration on the life and work of James Presley Ball (1825-1904), a black photographer who became an internationally recognized artist, abolitionist, and entrepreneur. The project includes two temporary exhibitions, two traveling exhibitions, an exhibition catalogue, and public and educational programs. Project collaborators include Cincinnati Museum Center, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Arts Consortium of Cincinnati, and national humanities scholars.

HAA-263850-19Digital Humanities: Digital Humanities Advancement GrantsUniversity of Kentucky Research FoundationReading the Invisible Library: Rescuing the Hidden Texts of Herculaneum1/1/2019 - 12/31/2022$500,000.00WilliamBrentSeales   University of Kentucky Research FoundationLexingtonKY40506-0004USA2018ClassicsDigital Humanities Advancement GrantsDigital Humanities45000050000449977.5650000

The continued development of computerized techniques to recover writings from the Herculaneum library, the entire collections of which were destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 BCE.

Using authentic materials from national libraries in Italy and France, this project will apply proven computerized techniques and innovate new approaches to reveal the hidden writing in the most iconic collection of damaged humanities manuscripts--the scrolls from Herculaneum. During this phase of the project, key goals are to develop and analyze a new method for recovering and enhancing ink signals from within scrolls and manuscripts, and to develop new machine-learning (AI) techniques to render those signals into visible text.

HB-262224-19Research Programs: Awards for FacultyKatie KapurchBlackbird Singing: A Cultural History of African-American Musical Conversations with the Beatles1/1/2020 - 12/31/2020$60,000.00Katie Kapurch   Texas State University - San MarcosSan MarcosTX78666-4684USA2018Media StudiesAwards for FacultyResearch Programs600000600000

Research and writing leading to publication of a book about African American reception of the Beatles, from the late 1960s to the present.

Blackbird Singing: Black America Remixes the Beatles presents a cultural history of African-Americans’ musical conversations with the Beatles from the late 1960s to today. To date, no academic or trade book has offered a comprehensive view of this particular interracial dialogue, which informs the story of American popular music, especially mid-twentieth century rock ‘n’ roll, and, broadly, the study of American culture. My historically situated close readings show how black artists are simultaneously listeners and creators, because ignoring their roles as audiences in the global economy of the music marketplace marginalizes them in the cultural history of American popular song. Blackbird Singing is also unique in its transdisciplinary and multi-genre investigation of American music from the 1960s to today, which makes the monograph relevant to diverse and multigenerational readers in the reading public, as well as scholars and students of culture, music, and history.

HB-50333-13Research Programs: Awards for FacultyBenjamin Lindsay LapidusThe History of Spanish Caribbean Music in New York City and the Shaping of an International Sound, 1940-19909/1/2013 - 8/31/2014$50,400.00BenjaminLindsayLapidus   CUNY Research Foundation, John Jay CollegeNew YorkNY10019-1007USA2012Music History and CriticismAwards for FacultyResearch Programs504000504000

I am requesting funding from the NEH to complete a book on the unwritten history of Spanish Caribbean music in New York City from 1940-1990 that will detail how musicians, educators, composers, arrangers, folklorists, and instrument builders collaborated to shape the course of both popular and folkloric genres in profound ways. I have conducted numerous interviews, acquired scores, and done archival research. Funding for one year starting in Fall 2013 will allow me to organize this research and write the manuscript. This project is intellectually significant to the humanities, because it revises and corrects the dominant historical narrative of Latin music in New York that has overlooked and underestimated the nature and scope of the connections among these distinct groups of specialists.

HT-272556-20Digital Humanities: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital HumanitiesUniversity of MinnesotaBuilding capable communities for crowdsourced transcription9/1/2020 - 8/31/2024$249,856.00Evan RobertsSamantha BlickhanUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisMN55455-2009USA2020Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherInstitutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital HumanitiesDigital Humanities24985602490560

An institute to help cultural organizations plan, develop, and launch crowdsourcing projects focused on engaging communities with their collections.

Converting printed texts into digital formats is now straightforward, enabling humanities scholars to mine the world's cultural heritage. But many crucial sources exist only in manuscript form and are difficult to integrate into the future of the digital humanities. If we can convert handwriting into machine-readable text we can connect the past and present of the humanities. People can often decipher unfamiliar handwriting, and improvements in software and public engagement have made crowdsourced transcription effective. But getting it all right—design, engagement, and accuracy—remains tricky. The University of Minnesota, Adler Planetarium, and Zooniverse, as leaders in developing crowdsourcing transcription platforms, will convene an Institute developing a cohort of leaders who develop crowdsourced transcription projects. The Institute will take a cohort through the process together, led by a team with successful experience in crowdsourced transcription and teaching.

LT-50001-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionDetroit Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Mark Bowden   Detroit Public LibraryDetroitMI48202-4093USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50005-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionHolly Springs Branch LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00ElenaM.Owens   Holly Springs Branch LibraryHolly SpringsNC27540USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

"Pride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience" is a collaboration between the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Library Association (ALA), and the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. "Pride and Passion has been designated as part of the NEH's "We the People" initiative, exploring significant events and themes in our nation's history and culture and advancing knowledge of the principles that define America. The story of African Americans in baseball is a remarkable and fascinating slice of American history. It parallels the failures of the greater American society in solving the racial problems resulting from slavery, the Civil War and the confusion of Reconstruction. Baseball is one of America's central institutions, and it has long reflected the complicated and painful history of race in the United States. "Pride and Passion" tells the story of black baseball players in the U.S. over the past century and a half.

LT-50006-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionFort Scott Community College Endowment AssociationPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Susan Messer   Fort Scott Community College Endowment AssociationFort ScottKS66701-3141USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50009-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionLouisville Free Public Library FoundationPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Debra Oberhausen   Louisville Free Public Library FoundationLouisvilleKY40203-2257USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters,scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of the segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50014-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionDeKalb Library FoundationPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00AlisonL.Weissinger   DeKalb Library FoundationDecaturGA30030-3413USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50018-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionNatrona County Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Kate Mutch   Natrona County Public LibraryCasperWY82601USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50022-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionDaytona Beach Community CollegePride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Dustin Weeks   Daytona Beach Community CollegeDaytona BeachFL32114-2817USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000 square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50025-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionUniversity of Massachusetts, AmherstPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00BrianD.Bunk   University of Massachusetts, AmherstAmherstMA01003-9242USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50030-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionLone Star College System DistrictPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00MichaelD.Stafford   Lone Star College System DistrictSpringTX77381-4356USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50031-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionHuntsville-Madison County Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00SophieWen-LingYoung   Huntsville-Madison County Public LibraryHuntsvilleAL35804USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50035-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionMilwaukee Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Paula Kiely   Milwaukee Public LibraryMilwaukeeWI53233-2309USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50036-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionOmaha Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00JoanneFergusonCavanaugh   Omaha Public LibraryOmahaNE68102-1601USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000 square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50037-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionOcean County LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Karla Ivarson   Ocean County LibraryToms RiverNJ08753USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50039-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPoughkeepsie Public Library DistrictPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Lauren Muffs   Poughkeepsie Public Library DistrictPoughkeepsieNY12601-4029USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50040-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPenn StatePride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00GregoryA.Crawford   Penn StateUniversity ParkPA16802-1503USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50041-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionNew York Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Robert McBrien   New York Public LibraryNew YorkNY10016-0109USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000 square foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.

LT-50046-08Public Programs: Small Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionBladen County Public LibraryPride and Passion: The African American Baseball Experience - A Traveling Exhibition to Libraries9/1/2008 - 12/31/2012$2,500.00Shamella Cromartie   Bladen County Public LibraryElizabethtownNC28337USA2008U.S. HistorySmall Grants to Libraries: Pride and PassionPublic Programs2500025000

The 1,000-square-foot panel exhibition examines baseball as a reflection of race relations in the United States, asking how baseball has shaped, and been shaped by, national identity and culture. Photographs, broadsides, team rosters, scorecards, and other baseball memorabilia would tell the story of black participation in baseball, from the integrated amateur leagues of the nineteenth century and the creation of segregated Negro Leagues in the Jim Crow era to Jackie Robinson's now-famous breaking of the color barrier in 1947.