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Keywords: stony the road we trod (ALL of these words -- matching substrings)

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Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
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BH-231421-15Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureAlabama Humanities Foundation"Stony the Road We Trod...": Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement10/1/2015 - 12/1/2016$179,370.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Alabama Humanities FoundationBirminghamAL35205-7011USA2015U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs17937001793700

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for seventy-two school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

"Stony the Road" is a comprehensive, interactive teacher workshop that includes lectures by renowned scholars, an opportunity to enter into discourse with movement participants, development of instructional units, and travel to key sites of memory dedicated to the Modern Civil Rights Movement. Each week of Stony the Road We Trod (Stony), teachers will participate in a comprehensive study of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and the role that Alabama played in thrusting the struggle for civil rights to the forefront of every media outlet in the world. Teachers, by participating in interactive lectures and discourse with noted scholars and historians, will come to understand the true impact of the movement and how the events in Alabama were central to the movement. The two week-long sessions will take run June 26-July 2 and July 10-16, 2016.

BH-50004-04Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureBirmingham Civil Rights InstituteStony the Road We Trod: Using Alabama's Civil Rights Landmarks to Teach American History1/1/2004 - 3/31/2005$301,000.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Birmingham Civil Rights InstituteBirminghamAL35203-1911USA2003History, GeneralLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs30100003010000

Four one-week workshops to study the historical evidence that documents the events leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

BH-50051-05Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureBirmingham Civil Rights InstituteStony the Road We Trod: Using Alabama's Civil Rights Landmarks to Teach American History1/1/2005 - 12/31/2005$300,000.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Birmingham Civil Rights InstituteBirminghamAL35203-1911USA2004History, GeneralLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs30000003000000

Four one-week summer workshops for 200 teachers on the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery and Birmingham, Alabama, to be held at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

BH-50201-07Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureBirmingham Civil Rights InstituteStony the Road We Trod: Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement10/1/2006 - 9/30/2007$217,000.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Birmingham Civil Rights InstituteBirminghamAL35203-1911USA2006U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs21700002170000

Three one-week workshops for 150 school teachers to study the civil rights movement through historic sites in Birmingham, Selma, Montgomery, and Tuskegee, Alabama.

BH-50294-08Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureBirmingham Civil Rights Institute"'Stony' the Road We Trod. . . ": Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement10/1/2008 - 12/31/2009$170,000.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Birmingham Civil Rights InstituteBirminghamAL35203-1911USA2008U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs17000001700000

The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute requests support for a Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for Teachers titled " '"Stony" the Road We Trod . . .': Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement." The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI) will serve as the lead institution for a series of three one-week scholarly presentations including experiential field studies at civil rights landmarks in Birmingham, Selma, Montgomery, and Tuskegee, Alabama. Teachers selected to take part in this interactive workshop experience will participate in lectures by scholars, meet and interact with iconic leaders and foot soldiers of the Civil Rights Movement, travel to important civil rights sites as well as sites dedicated to the preservation of civil rights history, review archival film footage and primary sources and use national history standards (or their own state standards) to develop curricular products.

BH-50339-09Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and CultureBirmingham Civil Rights InstituteStony the Road We Trod: Using America's Civil Rights Landmarks to Teach American History10/1/2009 - 12/31/2010$159,728.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Birmingham Civil Rights InstituteBirminghamAL35203-1911USA2009U.S. HistoryLandmarks of American History and CultureEducation Programs15972801597280

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers on the history and legacy of the Civil Rights movement in Alabama.

The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute requests support for a Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop for Teachers titled " 'Stony the Road We Trod': Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement." The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI) will serve as the lead institution for a series of one-week scholarly presentations including experiential field studies at civil rights landmarks in Birmingham, Selma, Montgomery, and Tuskegee, Alabama. Teachers selected to take part in this interactive workshop experience will participate in lectures by scholars, meet and interact with iconic leaders and foot soldiers of the Civil Rights Movement, travel to important civil rights sites as well as sites dedicated to the preservation of civil rights history, review archival film footage and primary sources and use national history standards (or their own state standards) to develop curricular products.

ES-256862-17Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsAlabama Humanities Foundation"Stony the Road We Trod...": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy10/1/2017 - 12/1/2018$185,907.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Alabama Humanities FoundationBirminghamAL35205-7011USA2017U.S. HistoryInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs18590701859070

A three-week institute for thirty school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

"Stony the Road We Trod...": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy offers educators a rare opportunity to explore America’s Second Revolution for Civil and Human Rights in an interactive, intensive institute. Often referred to as, the “Heart of Dixie,” the “Cradle of the Confederacy," and the “Birthplace of the Modern Civil Rights Movement,” Alabama's story is one of great magnitude and depth that must be explored in thought and discussion as much as through text and research in order to understand and appreciate the significance of the role it played in shifting the strategy and outcomes of the national and global struggles for civil rights. Through lectures and discussions with noted scholars; interactions with foot soldiers of the Movement; trips to key sites of memory; and primary source research, participants will better understand how events in Alabama impacted the struggle for civil rights around the world. This inspiring, three-week institute will be offered July 8-28, 2018.

ES-261681-18Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsAlabama Humanities Foundation"Stony the Road We Trod . . . ": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy10/1/2018 - 12/1/2019$178,871.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Alabama Humanities FoundationBirminghamAL35205-7011USA2018U.S. HistoryInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs17887101788700

A three-week institute for 30 school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

"Stony the Road We Trod...": Exploring Alabama's Civil Rights Legacy offers educators a rare opportunity to explore America’s Second Revolution for Civil and Human Rights in an interactive, intensive institute. Often referred to as, the “Heart of Dixie,” the “Cradle of the Confederacy," and the “Birthplace of the Modern Civil Rights Movement,” Alabama's story is one of great magnitude and depth that must be explored in thought and discussion as much as through text and research in order to understand and appreciate the significance of the role it played in shifting the strategy and outcomes of the national and global struggles for civil rights. Through lectures and discussions with noted scholars; interactions with foot soldiers of the Movement; trips to key sites of memory; and primary source research, participants will better understand how events in Alabama impacted the struggle for civil rights around the world. This inspiring, three-week institute will be offered July 7-27, 2019.

ES-272533-20Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsAlabama Humanities Foundation“Stony the Road We Trod…”: Exploring Alabama’s Civil Rights Legacy10/1/2020 - 9/30/2023$220,711.00MarthaV.Bouyer   Alabama Humanities FoundationBirminghamAL35205-7011USA2020U.S. HistoryInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs22071102100910

A three-week institute for 30 school teachers on the history and legacy of the civil rights movement in Alabama.

“Stony the Road...” connects the Modern Civil Rights Movement to other key events in U.S. history and examines how these events forced the nation to wrestle with issues of race and citizenship. Summer scholars examine how strategies to address segregation and discrimination in Alabama differed from one place and time to another. Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth, mastermind of the Birmingham campaign, attacked segregation on all fronts: from the back of the bus to the front of the voting booth. From Birmingham to Selma, Montgomery, and Tuskegee, teachers take a journey together to reconcile knowledge of this era with facts, memory, history, and myths. In addition to the provided books, participants will have access to related documents, bibliographies, songs, poetry, curricular products developed by previous participants, and other instructional tools.

HT-272565-20Digital Humanities: Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital HumanitiesUniversity of Arkansas, FayettevilleSAROI: Spatial Archaeology Residential and Online Studies9/1/2020 - 8/31/2023$250,000.00Carla KlehmJackson CothrenUniversity of Arkansas, FayettevilleFayettevilleAR72701-1201USA2020ArchaeologyInstitutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital HumanitiesDigital Humanities2500000214988.990

An online and in-person mentorship and training program to facilitate collaboration among scholars at the Spatial Archaeology Residential and Online Institute, devoted to large-scale archeological analysis of objects, structures, sites, and landscapes.

The Spatial Archaeology Residential and Online Institute, hosted at the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas, addresses an increasing need for advanced training in spatial methodologies in archaeology and heritage management. Spatial analysis of human behavior involves data on a “very large-scale,” as there are many aspects involved in understanding how humans perceive space, occupy it, and alter it. Obtaining this “very large-scale” data involves the high-density measurement and analysis of objects, structures, sites, and landscapes. Recent developments that allow for higher density and more precision are helping us address complex questions about human nature that heretofore were not possible. SAROI seeks to support 16 junior scholars in an online and in-person training and mentorship program over the course of three years, with the intent of building long-term collaborative relationships among Fellows and between Fellows and SAROI staff.

TR-266341-19Public Programs: Media Projects ProductionFuturo Media GroupUNLADYLIKE20208/1/2019 - 12/31/2020$700,000.00Charlotte Mangin   Futuro Media GroupNew YorkNY10027-4843USA2019Women's HistoryMedia Projects ProductionPublic Programs600000100000600000100000

Production of twenty-six animated short documentary films about little-known Progressive Era women who achieved success in science, business, aviation, journalism, politics, medicine, exploration, and the arts.

UNLADYLIKE2020 is an innovative multimedia series featuring little-known American women from the turn of the 20th century, set to launch in 2020 for the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage. Our 26 animated documentary shorts will be released digitally on a weekly basis by PBS’s flagship biography series American Masters for the 26 weeks between March 1, the start of Women’s History Month, and August 26, 2020, a day known as Women's Equality Day, named to commemorate the 1920 ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, and also will be repackaged into a public television broadcast hour. Each 5-to-7 minute episode will profile a female trailblazer from the Progressive Era in U.S. history (1890s through 1920s) who broke barriers in then-male-dominated fields such as science, business, aviation, journalism, politics, medicine, exploration, and the arts.

ZB-250690-16Challenge Programs: Next Generation Humanities PhD (Implementation)Duke UniversityDoctoral Training for the Versatile Humanist9/1/2016 - 6/30/2020$350,000.00EdwardJ.Balleisen   Duke UniversityDurhamNC27705-4677USA2016Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherNext Generation Humanities PhD (Implementation)Challenge Programs03500000350000

Unified efforts to prepare students for non-academic careers, expand intellectual horizons, extend analytical skills, and foster a cultural transformation in how the university envisages the societal impacts of humanistic experience.

Humanists and interpretive social scientists have distinctive skills that can benefit NGOs, government agencies and businesses. Research universities have the obligation to prepare their doctoral students to contribute to all realms of society. Through this proposal, Duke University intends to create greater versatility in our doctoral students by: 1) shifting university norms by engaging faculty in efforts to transform doctoral education; 2) fostering pedagogical innovation and enhancing professional development opportunities; 3) developing external internship opportunities; 4) strengthening and leveraging our alumni network to provide networking connections or career guidance; and 5) creating a navigator to support students as they consider co-curricular opportunities and weigh career options.