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Organization name: crow canyon

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Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
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BH-231011-15Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Mesa Verde National Park and the Construction of Pueblo Indian History10/1/2015 - 12/31/2016$175,000.00Kathleen Stemmler   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2015AnthropologyLandmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs17500001738000

Two one-week workshops for seventy-two school teachers to study Pueblo history and culture through the archaeology of Mesa Verde.

Mesa Verde National Park and the Construction of Pueblo Indian History is two one-week residence-based workshops, each for 36 school teachers. The workshops focus on three fundamental questions that touch the lives of Americans today: 1) Who creates America’s history and culture? 2) How do we come to know and appreciate the time depth, people, and activities that comprise the past and inform the present? 3) How did people in the past use their knowledge and creativity to cope with population growth in an ever-changing environment (an interactive cycle known as the Neolithic Demographic Transition, or Neolithic Revolution)? The workshop illustrates these concepts using two historic landmarks: Mesa Verde National Park and the Indian Camp Ranch Archaeological District—both among the world’s greatest archaeological treasures and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

BH-267048-19Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Mesa Verde National Park and Pueblo Indian History10/1/2019 - 12/31/2021$180,175.00SusanCRyan   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2019AnthropologyLandmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs18017501757420

Two one-week workshops for 72 school teachers to study Pueblo history and culture through the archaeology of Mesa Verde.

Mesa Verde National Park and Pueblo Indian History is a one-week residence-based workshop that will be offered twice during the summer of 2020, each time for 36 K–12 educators. The Workshop focuses on three fundamental questions: 1) How do we come to know and appreciate the time depth, people, and activities that comprise the past and shaped our contemporary world? 2) Who creates America’s history and culture? 3) How do contemporary Pueblo people (and all Americans not of European descent) balance their cultural identity and continuity with Euro American ideals of assimilation and the melting pot? These questions touch the lives of all Americans today, and the Workshop offers historic and multicultural perspectives using Mesa Verde National Park and the surrounding Mesa Verde Region—home to humans for over 10,000 years and containing some of the world’s greatest archaeological treasures.

BH-50317-09Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Seeking the Center Place: The Mesa Verde Cultural Landscape and Pueblo Indian Homeland10/1/2009 - 12/31/2010$158,060.00MarjorieR.Connolly   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2009AnthropologyLandmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs15806001580600

Two one-week workshops for eighty school teachers on the archaeology and history of the Pueblo people in the Mesa Verde region.

Seeking the Center Place is a one-week residence-based workshop for four groups of 20 school teachers. The workshop focuses on: 1) the importance of the landmarks in the Mesa Verde archaeological region, 2) the deep history and enduring vitality of Pueblo Indian people, and 3) the critically important but neglected subject matter, America's excluded past. The workshop is significant because it offers school teachers an unequaled opportunity to trace the history of one of the continent's most enduring cultural groups--Pueblo Indians--from their ancient past into the 21st century. The workshop's intellectual scope is regional, but it will focus on three specific historic landmarks: the Goodman Point Unit of Hovenweep National Monument, Sand Canyon Pueblo in Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, and Mesa Verde National Park--all among the world's greatest archaeological treasures and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

BH-50548-13Education Programs: Landmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Mesa Verde National Park: Pueblo Culture in the American Southwest10/1/2013 - 12/31/2014$179,724.00Kathleen Stemmler   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2013Social Sciences, GeneralLandmarks of American History and Culture for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs17972401797240

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to study Pueblo history and culture through the archaeology of Mesa Verde.

Two one-week Landmarks workshops for eighty school teachers to study Pueblo history and culture through the archaeology of Mesa Verde. These workshops immerse teachers in the study of America's Pueblo people. Teachers explore the beliefs and practices of the Pueblo and learn, through archaeology, how the Pueblo shaped the physical and cultural landscape of the Mesa Verde region. The workshops take place in two locations, Mesa Verde National Historic Park and its neighboring Indian Camp Ranch Archaeological District. These sites, dating from 500 to 1300 CE, are home to "the greatest number of archaeological sites found anywhere in the U.S." Senior archaeologists Shirley Powell and Mark Varien, and Native Pueblo scholars Donna Pino and Ernest M. Vallo, lead the scholarly team. Books by Powell, Varien, and a new work by Scott Ortman, the award-winning Winds from the North: Tewa Origins and Historical Anthropology, anchor the readings. A set of primary documents compiled by Crow Canyon supplement these texts. On Monday and Tuesday, lectures cover the main themes of ancient Pueblo history; sessions on the laboratory and field methods used by archaeologists introduce teachers to relevant techniques and interpretive methods. Teachers then spend two days in Mesa Verde studying cliff dwellings, rock images, and related artifacts that illuminate Pueblo life. Crow Canyon archaeologists Scott Ortman, Kari Schleher, and Shanna Diederichs give participants the opportunity to study the sites in small groups and to participate in an active excavation. On Friday at Crow Canyon, participants discuss the week's activities with a view toward integrating the academic and field experiences. Participants also have the opportunity to share plans for translating workshop material into the classroom.

CH-20751-01Challenge Programs: Challenge GrantsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Expanding America's History Through Archaeology: Crow Canyon's Distance Learning Team.12/1/1999 - 7/31/2004$500,000.00RickyR.Lightfoot   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2001ArchaeologyChallenge GrantsChallenge Programs05000000500000

Endowment for a distance-learning program in archaeology.

CS-20034-91Challenge Programs: Challenge Grants for Advanced Study CentersCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Endowing Education Method and Material Development12/1/1989 - 7/31/1994$285,000.00StephenH.Lekson   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA1991ArchaeologyChallenge Grants for Advanced Study CentersChallenge Programs02850000285000

To support endowment of new staff positions to expand the Center's educational activities.

ES-23177-02Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Cultural History in the American Southwest: Convergences and Crossroads10/1/2002 - 12/31/2003$124,352.00M. Elaine Davis   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2002History, GeneralInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs12435201243520

A four-week institute for 25 high school teachers on the cultural history of the Four Corners region of the American Southwest.

ES-250803-16Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.From Mesa Verde to Santa Fe: Pueblo Identity in the Southwest10/1/2016 - 12/31/2017$187,349.00SharonK.Milholland   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2016AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs1873490164685.070

A three-week institute for twenty-five schoolteachers on the history, migration, and present-day world of the southwestern Pueblo peoples.

World-altering challenges confronted the Pueblo Indians of U. S. Southwest starting in AD 1300. They departed their ancestral homelands, migrated into the northern Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, redefined themselves in the context of other Pueblo communities, only to be confronted by Spanish conquistadors, missionaries, and colonists intent on acquiring wealth, saving souls, and generally replacing the indigenous populations of New Mexico. This little-known history is the subject of a three-week institute for 25 school teachers that evaluates why and how ancestral Pueblo people left their Mesa Verde homeland, what happened when they arrived and settled in the northern Rio Grande Valley, and how the arrival of Spaniards affected their options and shaped their adaptations. The institute integrates archaeological data, ethnohistorical documents, and traditional narratives to provide a richer interpretive context than available through any single line of evidence.

ES-261629-18Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Continuity and Change in the Pueblo World from Mesa Verde to Santa Fe10/1/2018 - 12/31/2019$184,844.00SharonK.MilhollandKathleen StemmlerCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2018AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs18484401848440

A three-week institute for 25 school teachers to explore the migration of Pueblo peoples from their homeland in Colorado’s Mesa Verde region to New Mexico’s Rio Grande Valley.

World-altering challenges confronted the Pueblo Indians of the U. S. Southwest starting in A.D. 1280. They departed their ancestral homelands, migrated into the northern Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, redefined themselves in the context of other Pueblo communities, only to be confronted by Spanish conquistadors, missionaries, and colonists intent on acquiring wealth, saving souls, and replacing the indigenous populations of New Mexico. The institute examines this history from the perspectives of two cultures (Euroamerican and Pueblo) and three academic disciplines (archaeology, ethnohistory, and oral history. We highlight a fascinating history and show how distinct academic disciplines and cultural core values interact to produce different data, epistemologies, and ultimately different reconstructions of the past. The complexities produced by the mix of academic disciplines and cultural perspectives offer opportunities to develop projects for all classroom subjects and grades.

ES-281200-21Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.From Chaco to Mesa Verde: Ancestral Pueblo Migrations and Identity Formation in the American Southwest10/1/2021 - 9/30/2023$187,202.00SusanCRyan   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2021ArchaeologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs18720201736350

A two-week, residential institute for 25 K-12 teachers to examine the twelfth-century Pueblo migration through interdisciplinary perspectives.

From Chaco to Mesa Verde: Ancestral Pueblo Migrations and Identity Formation in the American Southwest, a Level II, two-week summer Institute for 25 K-12 teachers, will be conducted by the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center from July 17th – 30th, 2022. This newly proposed Institute highlights the factors leading up to, and following, the migrations of ancestral Pueblo people from their homelands in Chaco Canyon to the Mesa Verde region during the 12th century A.D. Utilizing a multi-vocal approach of both Western scientific and Native traditional knowledge, the goal of this Institute is to investigate human migrations as broad, socially-complex processes in order to further educate teachers, and subsequently students, on a topic that has been, and will always remain, relevant to humans in every society throughout the world in the past, present, and future.

ES-50051-04Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Seeking the Center Place: Cultural Continuity and Change in the Pueblo World10/1/2004 - 12/31/2005$162,963.00M. Elaine Davis   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2004AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs16296301629630

A four-week summer institute for twenty-five school teachers to explore the history, culture, and worldview of the Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest.

ES-50288-09Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Peoples of the Mesa Verde Region: Connecting the Past with the Present through Humanities Research10/1/2009 - 12/31/2010$150,864.00M. Elaine Franklin   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2009AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs15086401508640

A three-week school teacher summer institute for twenty-five participants on the cultural history of the Pueblo Indian peoples of the American Southwest, from 1000 B.C. to the present.

Peoples of the Mesa Verde Region is a three-week institute for 25 school teachers that will be conducted by the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center from June 27 to July 17, 2010. The institute will provide American school teachers with an unequaled opportunity to trace the history of one of the continent's most enduring cultural groups--Pueblo Indians--from its deep past into the twenty-first century. The multidisciplinary field of anthropology provides the primary lens through which participants will examine both the ancient and modern Pueblo world. Authentic research experiences give participants the opportunity to learn first-hand how archaeologists conduct their work to reconstruct Pueblo history. The participation of Pueblo scholars and visits to a modern Pueblo community present a window into how Pueblo culture has endured over time and a glimpse into what Pueblo life and education practices are like today.

ES-50327-10Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Bridging Cultures: Diversity and Unity in the Pueblo World10/1/2010 - 12/31/2011$169,522.00M. Elaine FranklinMarjorieR.ConnollyCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2010AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs16952201695220

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the history and culture of the Pueblo Indians.

Bridging Cultures is a 3-week institute for 25 school teachers that will be conducted by the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center from July 17 to August 6, 2011. The institute offers an immersive experience in the American Southwest that will help teachers advance their understanding of the critically important humanities concepts, culture and diversity. The history of the Pueblo Indians (one of the continent's most enduring cultural groups) provides the context for this study. The interdisciplinary field of anthropology offers the primary lens through which participants will examine the Pueblo world. Authentic research experiences give participants opportunities to learn first-hand how anthropologists and Pueblo scholars reconstruct Pueblo history and conceptualize the boundaries of Pueblo identity and culture. Visits to modern Pueblo communities present a window into how Pueblo culture formed, how it has endured, and how it is expressed in diverse communities today.

ES-50380-11Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Diversity and Unity in the Pueblo World10/1/2011 - 12/31/2012$190,506.00MarjorieR.ConnollyMarjorieR.ConnollyCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2011AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs1905060171213.680

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the archaeological record and history of the Pueblo peoples.

Bridging Cultures is a 3-week institute for 25 school teachers that will be conducted by the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center from June 24 to July 14, 2012. The updated institute offers an immersive experience in the American Southwest that will help teachers advance their understanding of the critically important humanities concepts, culture and diversity. The history of the Pueblo Indians—one of the continent’s most enduring cultural groups—provides the context for this study. The interdisciplinary field of anthropology provides the primary lens through which participants will examine the Pueblo worlds. Authentic research experiences give participants opportunities to learn first-hand how anthropologists and Pueblo scholars reconstruct Pueblo history, and conceptualize the boundaries of Pueblo identity and culture. Visits to modern Pueblo communities present a window into how Pueblo culture formed, how it has endured, and how it is expressed in diverse communities today.

ES-50436-12Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.Bridging Cultures: Diversity and Unity in the Pueblo World10/1/2012 - 12/31/2013$179,792.00MarjorieR.Connolly   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2012AnthropologyInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs1797920162119.140

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the origins and cultural history of the Pueblo Indian peoples of the American Southwest.

Bridging Cultures is a 3-week institute for 25 school teachers that will be conducted by the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center from June 30 to July 20, 2013. The updated institute offers an immersive experience in the American Southwest that will help teachers advance their understanding of the critically important humanities concepts, culture and diversity. The history of the Pueblo Indians—one of the continent’s most enduring cultural groups—provides the context for this study. The interdisciplinary field of anthropology provides the primary lens through which participants will examine the Pueblo world. Authentic research experiences give participants opportunities to learn first-hand how anthropologists and Pueblo scholars reconstruct Pueblo history and conceptualize the boundaries of Pueblo identity and culture. Visits to contemporary Pueblo communities present a window into how Pueblo culture formed, how it has endured, and how it is expressed in diverse communities today.

ES-50551-14Education Programs: Institutes for K-12 EducatorsCrow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.From Mesa Verde to Santa Fe: Pueblo Identity in the Southwest10/1/2014 - 12/31/2015$196,058.00MarjorieR.Connolly   Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Inc.CortezCO81321-9408USA2014U.S. HistoryInstitutes for K-12 EducatorsEducation Programs1960580179539.50

A three-week institute for twenty-five school teachers on the migration of Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest.

World-altering challenges confronted the Pueblo Indians of U.S. Southwest starting in A.D. 1300. They departed their ancestral homelands, migrated into the northern Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico, redefined themselves in the context of other Pueblo communities, only to be confronted by Spanish conquistadors, missionaries, and colonists intent on acquiring wealth, saving souls, and generally replacing the indigenous populations of New Mexico. This little-known history is the subject of a three-week institute for 25 school teachers that evaluates why and how one group of ancestral Pueblo people left their Mesa Verde homeland, what happened when they arrived and settled in the northern Rio Grande Valley, and how the arrival of Spaniards affected their options and shaped their responses. The institute integrates archaeological data, ethnohistorical documents, and traditional narratives to provide a richer interpretive context than available through any single line of evidence.