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Organization name: rochester institute of technology
Division or office: Preservation and Access

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Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
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PA-23159-98Preservation and Access: Preservation/Access ProjectsRITEffects of Fluctuating Environments on Library and Archive Materials7/1/1998 - 6/30/2002$388,100.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1998Archival Management and ConservationPreservation/Access ProjectsPreservation and Access3781001000037810010000

To support the investigation of the effects of fluctuating enviroments on library and archive materials in order to provide information for decision making and new guidelines and standards for preserving humanities resources.

PA-50123-03Preservation and Access: Preservation/Access ProjectsRITCreating Diagnostic Tools for Preserving Collections of Magnetic Tape7/1/2003 - 6/30/2006$393,705.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2003Archival Management and ConservationPreservation/Access ProjectsPreservation and Access39370503937050

The creation and testing of diagnostic tools to facilitate the identification of deteriorating audio and video formats in magnetic media collections that would enable collection managers to make informed preservation decisions.

PA-50585-04Preservation and Access: Preservation/Access ProjectsRITTraining for Effective Use of Environmental Control for the Preservation of Humanities Collections7/1/2004 - 6/30/2007$323,594.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2003Museum Studies or Historical PreservationPreservation/Access ProjectsPreservation and Access32359403235940

Educational programs focused on making more effective and efficient use of environmental control for preserving humanities collections.

PD-50023-12Preservation and Access: Documenting Endangered Languages - PreservationRITDesano Collaborative Project (639:3): Collection of Audio-Video Material and Texts7/1/2012 - 12/31/2015$70,937.00Wilsonde LimaSilva   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2012LinguisticsDocumenting Endangered Languages - PreservationPreservation and Access709370709370

documentation of Desano, an endangered Eastern Tukanoan language spoken in the northwestern Amazonian region of Colombia and Brazil. The project would create a corpus of recordings, transcriptions, and translations of the variety of Desano spoken in Colombia, and, ultimately, produce a dictionary and grammar of this language.

The Desano Collaborative Project (DCP) is a two-year, team-based project that will document Desano language and oral traditions, and support community members with training about language documentation. The focus of this documentation project will be the Desano communities in Colombia. Desano is spoken by 200-300 individuals in northwestern Amazonia, in Colombia and Brazil. It is a member of the Eastern branch of the Tukanoan family, a group of some 20 languages spoken in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Desano is one of the few languages in the family with speakers living in communities spread out in a wide geographical area comprising the three main rivers in the region: Vaupés, Papuri and Tiquié. It is in direct contact with other Eastern Tukanoan languages and with languages of other families (e.g., Makuan and Arawakan). Desano data will provide information that can be used by linguists to distinguish grammatical features inherited from Proto-Tukanoan from features acquired due to contact with other languages of the region. In addition, work on the language conducted during the past three years has revealed a number of typologically intriguing features that will be of broader linguistic interest. This collaborative project has three main documentation goals: (1) production of a high-quality textual and audio-visual corpus of Desano, with a focus on oral traditions; (2) the preparation of a Desano language database; and (3) provision of a collection of interlinearized texts and lexicon with English/Portuguese/Spanish translations. In addition, this project will actively support community efforts in language revitalization, by providing training to community members in aspects of language documentation, which is urgently needed in the Desano communities in Colombia. Meaningful collaborations with Desanos and Colombian linguists are an important part of this project. This will be the first language documentation project engaging the Desanos living in traditional communities in Colombia.

PE-252843-17Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITTeaching a Methodology for Photographic Process Identification1/1/2017 - 12/31/2018$182,730.00Alice Carver-Kubik   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2016Arts, OtherPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access18273001827300

The development of a series of workshops, webinars, and video tutorials on identifying historic and contemporary photographic processes, the critical first step in determining proper preservation care and treatment of photographic collections.

Image Permanence Institute (IPI) will provide a series of workshops, webinars, and video tutorials on photographic process identification. Images are fundamental to humanities scholarship. There is a critical need for the new generation of scholars, catalogers and curators to be able to recognize and contextualize pictorial objects. The project addresses a national audience and will provide important instruction and guidance derived from thirty years of IPI's research and educational experience. IPI has developed a structured process identification methodology and controlled vocabulary that starts from easily observable visual characteristics, and then connects with an exhaustive online resource for determination of process, date, relevance, and long-term care needs of pictorial objects. The workshops provide the vital element of first-hand experience with process examples and introduces the methodology and resources that IPI has developed.

PE-258388-18Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITDigital Print Preservation: Education and Training for Cultural Heritage Professionals1/1/2018 - 12/31/2019$195,049.00Daniel Burge   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2017Arts, OtherPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access19504901950490

Nine workshops to train approximately 450 cultural heritage professionals in the identification, handling, and care of digital prints held in humanities collections.

Image Permanence Institute at Rochester Institute of Technology is seeking an NEH Preservation and Access Education and Training grant to educate and train cultural heritage professionals in the humanities on the proper identification and long-term care of modern digitally-printed materials. This project will have a wide and substantial impact on the field. Hundreds of attendees will benefit from a program of nine workshops offered over three days, along with short sessions at each location that will allow additional attendees a half-day overview covering foundational knowledge on digital print processes and materials, a new descriptive language to assure accurate communication, and the basics of best care for these objects. The experience will be groundbreaking for attendees. Most have little or no experience in this area and this will be the first educational experience on the topic they have ever received.

PE-263506-19Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITTraining Sustainable Environmental Management Teams for Cultural Institutions1/1/2019 - 2/28/2021$199,801.00ChristopherM.CameronJenniferJaeGutierrezRITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2018Arts, GeneralPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access19980101998010

Eight three-day workshops and five 60-minute webinars for staff of museums, libraries, and archives about managing collection environments in sustainable ways. An estimated 2,650 participants would learn to assess the preservation quality of environmental conditions and the needs of collections, and to understand the impact of local climate and the basics of HVAC operations. The curriculum would also include strategies for reducing energy cost and consumption in cultural repositories while maintaining the preservation quality of collection environments.

The Image Permanence Institute, a preservation research laboratory, is applying for funding to support a two-year project focused on improving and increasing the capacity of humanities collections professionals to independently establish and maintain sustainable environmental management programs. In cultural institutions an environmental management team that includes both collections and facilities staff creates a structure in which the insights gained from environmental monitoring are actively used to inform environmental management. Webinars and workshops will provide essential knowledge and skills necessary for small, mid-size, and large institutions working to balance the preservation quality of collections environments with responsible building management and lower energy costs. This project has the potential to simultaneously improve the long-term preservation of humanities collections across the US while reducing the long-term costs associated with preserving those collections.

PE-50050-10Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITSustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments1/1/2010 - 12/31/2011$248,480.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2009Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access24848002484800

Funding supports five workshops and nine webinars for staff of museums, libraries, and archives about managing collection environments in sustainable ways. Participants will learn to assess the preservation quality of environmental conditions and the needs of collections materials, and to understand the impact of local climate and the basics of HVAC operations. Strategies for reducing energy cost and consumption in cultural repositories without sacrificing the preservation quality of collection environments will also be identified.

The project entitled Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments will enable cultural institutions with significant humanities research materials to avoid risks to collections while they support sustainability efforts and pursue opportunities for energy cost reduction. Through a series of 5 regional workshops and 9 webinars directed at a national audience of collection care, preservation and facility management staff, the project will convey the latest knowledge and techniques for managing the storage environment in sustainable ways. Nationally recognized experts in preservation environmental management and energy efficiency will present the latest research and field practice in leading US and European museums and libraries. Environmental assessment tools and methods that will be presented have been developed through previous NEH projects and will be based in part on actual case studies, for example through a decade of contracts with the Library of Congress.

PE-50070-12Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITSustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments - Series #21/1/2012 - 12/31/2013$168,000.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2011Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access16800001680000

Four regional workshops for up to 400 staff members of museums, libraries, and archives and up to nine webinars on managing environmental conditions for humanities collections in sustainable ways. Participants would explore strategies for reducing energy cost and consumption in cultural repositories without sacrificing the preservation quality of collection environments.

NEH funded the first series of Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments workshops and webinars in 2009. A second series of this extremely successful project will get the word out about defining and achieving an optimal and sustainable preservation environment to hundreds of institutions around the country. The first round involved people in all but four US states plus Puerto Rico and the Virgin islands. The project is national in scope and impact and is available to and accessible by institutions and individuals in every geographical region and from every type of collecting institution. Interest remains very high for up-to-date information on preservation research and the tools and strategies that enable staff to make informed, strategic decisions regarding sustainability that result in responsible collection care, energy cost savings, and carbon footprint reduction.

PE-50095-13Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITPreserving Film Collections for the Future - An Essential Web Application1/1/2013 - 12/31/2015$180,000.00Jean-Louis Bigourdan   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2012Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access18000001800000

The creation and testing of a freely available web-based application, FilmCare.org, that would provide an authoritative source of information and an easy-to-implement decision-making tool for preserving all types and formats of film materials.

The Image Permanence Institute is seeking funding for a major education and training project dealing with best practices for preserving film materials in museums, archives, libraries, and other repositories. This project will create a web-based educational application, FilmCare.org, that will provide an authoritative source of information and facilitate the otherwise intricate decision-making process for preserving all types and formats of film materials and implementing best-fit preservation strategies for a wide variety of real-life situations. Through an interactive process, this free tool will guide users to identify the nature of film materials, to design and conduct condition surveys, to evaluate existing collection environments, to analyze findings, to simulate certain improvements and their impact on the collections, to choose between alternatives approaches, to implement the appropriate preservation plan, and to monitor the state of preservation over time.

PE-50110-14Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Education and TrainingRITSustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments3/1/2014 - 2/28/2017$190,000.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2013Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Education and TrainingPreservation and Access19000001900000

Five regional workshops and nine webinars presented by the Image Permanence Institute on managing environmental conditions for humanities collections in sustainable ways for staff members of museums, libraries, and archives. Participants would explore strategies for reducing energy costs and consumption in cultural repositories without sacrificing the preservation quality of collection environments.

A third round of the Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments series will allow IPI the opportunity to provide information about defining and achieving an optimal and sustainable preservation environment to hundreds more institutions around the country. Our goal is to provide up-to-date information on preservation research along with the tools and strategies that will enable staff in collecting institutions to make informed, strategic decisions regarding sustainability that result in responsible collections care, energy cost savings, and carbon footprint reduction. The concepts and processes to be presented are based on years of preservation research and field experience with energy saving strategies and environmental management methods.

PG-51310-11Preservation and Access: Preservation Assistance GrantsRITArchival Storage of the Cary Graphic Arts Collection of 19th- and 20th-Century Posters1/1/2011 - 6/30/2012$6,000.00Amelia Hugill-Fontanel   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2010Archival Management and ConservationPreservation Assistance GrantsPreservation and Access6000060000

The purchase of storage furniture to rehouse a collection of approximately 2,000 19th- and 20th-century posters in the Cary Graphic Arts Collection. Improved storage will make it easier for faculty and students to view the posters safely. Highlights include posters by the American artist Edward Penfield used to promote "Harper's Magazine" from 1896 to 1899; government-issued posters from both World Wars encouraging public support; and graphic design posters from the Lester Beall, Will Burtin, Cipe Pineles, and Chermayeff and Geismar collections.

The grant will support the purchase of storage furniture to relocate the late nineteenth and twentieth century poster collections in the RIT Cary Graphic Arts Collection. These significant collections, numbering some 2,000 posters, are used for instruction, exhibition, and scholarly research. As a collective resource, the posters document trends in historical events, graphic design, communications, advertising, and printing technologies. New flat files will be purchased to increase storage area and thus improve crowded storage conditions. The ability to store manageable quantities of posters in each drawer will foster safe handling of these oversize artifacts. The methodical transfer of the posters to new storage drawers will begin in January 2011 and be completed by June 2012.

PH-20741-95Preservation and Access: National Heritage Preservation ProjectsRITDeveloping New Technologies for Environmental Assessment and Control in Preservation1/1/1995 - 6/30/2000$269,981.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1994Archival Management and ConservationNational Heritage Preservation ProjectsPreservation and Access26998102699810

To support the development and testing of a monitoring device that will providedata for determining optimal environmental conditions for the storage of humanities collections in libraries, archives, and museums.

PH-20925-00Preservation and Access: National Heritage Preservation ProjectsRITCreating a Computerized System to Document the Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Preservation of Collections7/1/2000 - 6/30/2004$355,450.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2000Archival Management and ConservationNational Heritage Preservation ProjectsPreservation and Access35545003554500

The creation and field testing of a coordinated system of computerized resources that can be used to document and control the effects of environmental conditions on the preservation of collections.

PR-258893-18Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITThe Impact of Temperature Transitions, Short-term and Seasonal, on the Moisture Content of Library and Archive Collections1/1/2018 - 12/31/2020$349,149.00Jean-Louis Bigourdan   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2017Arts, OtherResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access34914903491490

A three-year study focused on the impact of temperature changes, short-term and seasonal, on the moisture content of library and archive collections. The results would inform new sustainable preservation and access strategies for both large and small humanities collections.

The Image Permanence Institute is seeking funding for a three-year research project focused on the impact of environmental transitions on moisture content in library and archive collections. The potential for deterioration caused by moisture content exists in storage and access scenarios. This research will strengthen our understanding of the complex interactions between hygroscopic collection materials and their environment in response to temperature changes. Data collected has the potential to 1) determine the storage density necessary to effectively have hygroscopic materials control their moisture content, 2) provide a roadmap for controlling moisture content during periods of dryness and dampness, and 3) create a guide for temperature and relative humidity ranges that avoid mechanical damage during access and use. The results of this project have the potential to inform new sustainable preservation and access strategies for both large and small humanities research collections.

PR-263931-19Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITDigital Preservation and Access to Aural Heritage Via A Scalable, Extensible Method1/1/2019 - 12/31/2022$347,701.00Sungyoung Kim   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2018Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access34770103477010

The development of capture protocols, standards, and tutorials for long-term preservation and virtual representations of aural heritage.

Aural heritage preservation documents and recreates the auditory experience of culturally important places, enabling virtual interaction through physics-based reconstructions. A form of “intangible” cultural heritage, aural heritage is captured via spatial acoustics techniques, creating digital audio data for auralizations (reconstructions for listening). This project will 1) codify a protocol for the capture, verification, and auralization of aural heritage, demonstrated in case-study application on three culturally distinct sites; 2) create extensibility pathways for the widespread adoption of this protocol, including workshops, web-based tutorials, and other freely disseminated resources that enable non-acoustical specialists to apply the method to a diversity of sites. Case study demonstrations of the method will serve as models for site constituencies, Humanities researchers, and other cultural heritage practitioners, while providing a digital archive of endangered aural heritage.

PR-268783-20Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITLow-Cost End-to-End Spectral Imaging System for Historical Document Discovery3/1/2020 - 2/28/2024$350,000.00David Messinger   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2019Interdisciplinary Studies, GeneralResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access35000003476800

A Tier II project to develop a low-cost spectral imaging system and accompanying software to recover obscured and illegible text in historical materials.

Most research libraries and museums hold unique or rare items on which historically significant text is no longer legible due to deterioration or erasure. Spectral imaging - the process of collecting images of objects in many wavelengths of light - has become one solution for recovering obscured and illegible text on historical materials. Unfortunately, these systems are very expensive, and require knowledge of image processing methods. Most libraries and museums cannot afford these systems, nor do they have the capacity to process the data. To mitigate this, we propose to develop a low-cost spectral imaging system with accompanying low barrier-to-entry software.

PR-276878-21Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITIntegrating Risk Assessment for Pollutants into Energy-saving Strategies for Sustainable Environmental Management of Collection Storage Spaces3/1/2021 - 2/28/2025$350,000.00EmmaJRichardsonMarvin CummingsRITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2020Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access35000003500000

A three-year Tier II advanced research project to develop a diagnostic methodology for cultural heritage institutions to monitor and adjust room-level pollutant concentrations while implementing sustainable preservation strategies.

RIT’s Image Permanence Institute is applying for a three-year Tier II: Advanced Implementation Grant to integrate new methods for pollution risk assessment into best practices for implementing energy-saving strategies in mechanical systems serving collection spaces. Pollutants are pervasive, occurring in indoor and outdoor air, causing damage to nearly all forms of collection objects. The project will document, analyze, and interpret changes to pollutant concentrations when implementing energy-saving strategies, as compared to standard operation. A data collection and modeling procedure will be developed to help institutions balance their own indoor and outdoor pollutant levels with preservation quality, energy-savings optimization, and reduced carbon footprint. The proposed project’s relation to climate change, financial impact, and preservation makes it both timely and pressing, and the results will be applicable to the vast majority of collecting institutions.

PR-295923-24Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITEvaluating the Mechanical Stability of 3D Printed Materials to Inform Collections Care Decision Making for Preservation and Access4/1/2024 - 8/31/2026$315,854.00Meredith NoyesEmmaJRichardsonRITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2023Social Sciences, OtherResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access31585403158540

A Tier II project to investigate the mechanical stability of 3D-printed materials used for the storage, transport, display, and conservation treatment of heritage objects.

This research aims to evaluate the mechanical stability of 3D printed materials used in preservation and access activities. Digital scanning and printing technologies are finding increased use by cultural institutions as they offer new opportunities to reduce the risk of damage to objects during treatment and exhibition preparation by enabling custom-tailored solutions in minimally invasive ways. While 3D printing offers improved efficiencies and outcomes for certain applications, the mechanical and chemical stability of printed materials used in these contexts remains understudied. This project will assess mechanical properties of 3D printed materials exposed to changing environments and as they apply to three major areas of use in preservation and access, namely i) dimensional change of 3D printed materials used for object infills, ii) creep behavior of 3D printed mounts, and iii) damping properties of 3D printed materials in response to dynamic loads.

PR-50087-10Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITMethodologies for Sustainable HVAC Operation in Collection Environments5/1/2010 - 6/30/2016$399,926.00Jean-Louis Bigourdan   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2010Archival Management and ConservationResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access39992603999260

Investigation of the impact on paper-based collections of short-term fluctuations in environmental conditions resulting from the dynamic management, through temporary setbacks and shutoffs, of climate control systems. A guide would be published to help cultural institutions design and evaluate sustainable approaches to managing collection environments that achieve energy savings and long-term preservation of humanities collections.

"Methodologies for Sustainable HVAC Operation in Collection Environments" is a research project designed to allow staff of libraries and archives with significant humanities collections to confidently evaluate protocols for energy saving and sustainability, and to balance stewardship with fiscal realities and global responsibility. Since little research has been done on the impact of short-term fluctuations in temperature and humidity("setbacks" during unoccupied nights and weekends), neither facilities managers nor collection care specialists know how to evaluate their effect on collection preservation. Through a combination of laboratory research, field investigation, data modeling, and the creation of a user-friendly field guide-style publication, this project will provide the field with reliable data and a usable method for monitoring room environments and estimating the impact of short-term fluctuations on long-term preservation.

PR-50192-14Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITUnderstanding Moisture Equilibrium for Humanities Collections: A New Path to Sustainable Humidity Control4/1/2014 - 9/30/2017$350,000.00Jean-Louis Bigourdan   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2013Arts, OtherResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access3500000348039.170

Research into new ways of managing environmental conditions in collection spaces that could significantly reduce energy costs while providing safe environments for books, manuscripts, maps, prints, and other paper-based humanities materials. The Image Permanence Institute would study moisture equilibration rates for paper-based library materials and test new ways of managing relative humidity that could reduce the risks to collections from the most damaging conditions of summer humidity and winter dryness.

The thrust of this research is to quantify the potential of new approaches to seasonal management of humidity control, based on a full understanding of moisture equilibration processes for paper-based collections. Research will focus on the possibility that RH control can be used in a stepped or pulsed fashion to slow down the rate of moisture equilibration, thereby avoiding the most dangerous seasonal highs and lows. Specifically, better fundamental knowledge of equilibration behavior may allow identification of scenarios where seasonal peaks are not damaging, and scenarios for less expensive RH control aimed at 'slicing off' dangerous peaks. The research will quantify how materials' moisture content navigates between extreme RHs when exposed to either an uncontrolled seasonal humidity cycle, capped RH profile, stepped RH profile or pulsed RH profile. Research objectives are to quantify risks and benefits of these options in terms of preservation quality and potential energy savings.

PR-50213-15Preservation and Access: Research and DevelopmentRITDigital Image Correlation to Determine Shape Deformation of Paper-Based Collections due to Relative Humidity and Temperature3/1/2015 - 2/28/2019$399,825.00Alice Carver-KubikJenniferJaeGutierrezRITRochesterNY14623-5698USA2014Arts, OtherResearch and DevelopmentPreservation and Access39982503998250

An applied research project conducted by the Image Permanence Institute that would define the permissible limits of relative humidity (RH) for rare books and other library and archival materials that are critical for humanities research.

One of the most frequent questions asked by rare book curators and librarians is: "At what RH, especially with respect to dry conditions, does a serious risk of irreversible mechanical stress occur?" Mechanical (physical) damage due to dryness or excessive dampness is the principal reason why special collection materials require controlled environmental conditions. For many years, recommendations have emphasized close control around a target of 45-55% RH. What is not well established from actual experimentation, however, are the practical limits where irreversible damage takes place. This area of research—safe limits for RH—has received considerable attention in the fine and decorative arts, but not for the complex and diverse mechanical structures of bound volumes. To overcome the difficulty of studying mechanical behavior of complex book structures IPI will employ a new technology, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to dynamically assess expansion and contraction of composite objects.

PS-20040-85Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITImprovements in Test Methods for Photo Storage Materials9/1/1985 - 12/31/1986$72,547.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1985Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access725470725470

To support the development of improved ANSI (American National Standards Insti-tute) test methods used to determine the archival quality of storage materials for photographic collections. The chemical composition and reactivity of thesematerials are crucial to the long-term preservation of photographs.

PS-20152-87Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITSulfiding Protection for Silver Images7/1/1987 - 12/31/1990$196,062.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1987Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access19606201960620

To support the development of procedures that will enhance the longevity of silver-image photographic film by applying sulfiding agents that prevent oxidation.

PS-20159-88Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITResearch on the Deterioration of Cellulose Acetate Film1/1/1988 - 12/31/1990$145,199.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1988Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access1201992500012019925000

To support research on the causes of deterioration of cellulose acetate photographic film (safety film) and the development of recommendations for the preservation of this type of film.

PS-20273-89Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITPreservation Research and Development: Air Pollution Effects on Library Microforms7/1/1989 - 9/30/1993$485,403.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1989Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access385403100000385403100000

To support a preservation research and development project conducted by the Image Permanence Institute to determine the most effective means of preventing air pollutant damage to preservation microforms.

PS-20445-91Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITNew Approaches to Safety Film Preservation2/1/1991 - 1/31/1994$279,012.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1991Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access2290125000022901250000

To support scientific research on the degradation of cellulose acetate safety films, in order to develop improved archival storage techniques and new methods for early detection of film base deterioration.

PS-20565-92Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITPolysulfide Treatment of Existing Microfilm Collections7/1/1992 - 6/30/1995$256,595.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1992Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access2565950256475.70

To support a study of the effectiveness on previously developed microfilm of polysulfide treatment, a recently developed chemical application used to prevent oxidation of silver microfilm master film.

PS-20741-93Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITThe Effects of Air Pollution and Enclosure Protection on the Preservation of Images10/1/1993 - 6/30/1997$253,000.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1993Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access2060004700020600047000

To support a preservation research and demonstration project that would determine the effectiveness of photographic enclosures to prevent the deterioration of images due to pollutants in the atmosphere.

PS-20808-94Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITEnvironment and Enclosures in Film Preservation2/1/1994 - 1/31/1997$304,625.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1993Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access30462503046250

To support a research and demonstration project that will develop technical information necessary for the improvement of storage practices and enclosures for film collections in libraries and archives.

PS-21084-95Preservation and Access: Preservation and Access Projects Pre-1996RITTechnical Evaluation of Digital Imaging for Photographic Collections7/1/1995 - 6/30/1998$286,608.00JamesM.Reilly   RITRochesterNY14623-5698USA1995Archival Management and ConservationPreservation and Access Projects Pre-1996Preservation and Access28660802866080

To support the evaluation of procedures for digitizing photographs and the development of guidelines for creating and maintaining high-quality photographic images in digital form.