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Participant name: Leslie Schwalm

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Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
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FA-35354-99Research Programs: Fellowships for University TeachersLeslie A. SchwalmRedefining the Battlefield: Slavery and Freedom on a Midwestern Home Front during the Civil War8/1/1999 - 7/31/2000$30,000.00LeslieA.Schwalm   University of IowaIowa CityIA52242-1320USA1999U.S. HistoryFellowships for University TeachersResearch Programs300000300000

No project description available

FT-39665-94Research Programs: Summer StipendsLeslie A. SchwalmAfrican-American Women and the Transition from Slavery to Freedom in Lowcountry South Carolina5/1/1994 - 9/30/1994$4,750.00LeslieA.Schwalm   University of IowaIowa CityIA52242-1320USA1994U.S. HistorySummer StipendsResearch Programs4750047500

No project description available

FT-60490-13Research Programs: Summer StipendsLeslie A. SchwalmRacial Knowledge, Medical Science, and the American Civil War6/1/2013 - 7/31/2013$6,000.00LeslieA.Schwalm   University of IowaIowa CityIA52242-1320USA2013American StudiesSummer StipendsResearch Programs6000060000

This project studies emancipation as a critical moment in the history of ideas about race as they became an increasingly important aspect of American medical science and public health policy during and after the Civil War. Two converging and mutually constitutive developments serve as the project's focus: the modernization of American military and civilian medicine, and a new elaboration of evolving medical and scientific beliefs in racial categories of difference. Tracing the collection and analysis of medical and anthropometric data about African Americans conducted by various medical and military officials (including civilian health care workers as well as the U.S. Army and the United States Sanitary Commission) during the Civil War, this project demonstrates how medical science was recruited in the service of firmer, more irrefutable racial ideologies after the war.