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Funded Projects Query Form
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Keywords: Gender (ANY of these words -- matching substrings)
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Guotong Li, PhD
California State University, Long Beach Foundation (Long Beach, CA 90840-0004)

HB-294251-24
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2024 – 6/30/2025

Gender and Family in Globalization: Quanzhou and the Creation of Maritime Asia (1360-1640)

Research and writing leading to a book about the history of Muslim-Chinese encounters and relationships in maritime Asia from the 1360s to the 1640s.

This project is a history of the encounters between the Muslim diaspora and Chinese merchants across maritime Asia during the time of the Mongol retreat from China and governance by a revived Chinese dynasty. Analyzing these encounters is central to our understanding of the relationship between the flow of people and the society that nourishes that flow, and thus the dynamics of globalization itself. Globalization, I argue, is indeed the result of varied family formation through gradual layering of diasporic processes (i.e., chain migration), facilitated by gender and ethnicity. Countering the focus on European exploration and economic expansion, this project thus enriches global maritime history with the human agency of gender and ethnicity, defamiliarizing accepted understandings of processes and periods, and revising the commonly accepted picture of “maritime Asia” among general audiences and scholars alike.

Stef M. Shuster
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)

FEL-294385-24
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2024 – 7/31/2025

Trans Reproduction: Creating Productive and Socially Fit Transgender People, 1950s-1970s

Research and writing leading to a book that explores how transgender Americans navigated reproductive health care in the late 20th century.

My in-progress book, Trans Reproduction: Creating Productive and Socially Fit Transgender People, will examine how transgender people figure into the genealogy of US reproductive politics and continue to experience the spillover effects of State reproductive control in contemporary times. Trans Reproduction makes significant contributions to the humanities by 1) offering new insights into the genealogy of state reproductive control; 2) bringing trans people’s voices into studies of reproductive health; 3) building on insights from the social construction of knowledge and how norms become embedded in medical knowledge and practices; 4) examining how “facts” are used by medical providers to make sense of bodily difference and create ambivalent conceptions of autonomy; and 5) tracing how knowledge about gender and reproduction accumulated in trans medicine and influenced knowledge and practices in other medical fields.

Alice Weinreb
Loyola University, Chicago (Chicago, IL 60611-2147)

FEL-295076-24
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2024 – 6/30/2025

Anorexia Nervosa and the Rise of Disordered Eating in the Postwar World, 1970-2000

Research and writing leading to a history of eating disorders as a widespread international mental health epidemic of the late 20th century.

My project traces the remarkable rise of eating disorders during the final decades of the twentieth century. Based on research in the US, Europe, Israel, Australia, and South Africa, it explores how anorexia nervosa and its sister diagnoses of bulimia nervosa and binge eating were defined and treated in varied geopolitical contexts, paying particular attention to how these diagnoses were raced, classed, and gendered. At the same time that a transnational medical community developed to grapple with these new diagnoses, feminists, cultural critics, and ordinary people began to see eating disorders as distinctly meaningful, sicknesses that revealed something profound about the experience of living in the postwar world. By weaving together medical writing, feminist activism, diaries, mainstream media discourse, and personal correspondence from doctors and patients, my research reveals the value of a humanistic approach to understanding the construction and experience of mental illness.

Riya Das
Prairie View A & M University (Prairie View, TX 77445-6850)

HB-295124-24
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$30,000 (approved)
$30,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2024 – 6/30/2024

Critical Edition of The Daughters of Danaus by Mona Caird

Research and writing for a critical edition of Mona Caird’s The Daughters of Danaus, a novel published in England in 1894.

I will prepare the first critical edition of Mona Caird’s late nineteenth-century feminist novel, The Daughters of Danaus (1894). I will add an editorial apparatus to the novel, which includes my critical introduction and explanatory notes informed by the novel’s historical context as well as recent scholarly criticism in narrative form, gender, and empire studies. My critical edition will also contain an informative appendix comprising Caird’s other works that situate her novel in the larger oeuvre of her authorship. Aside from the nineteenth-century editions of the novel available in the public domain, the only other significant edition of the novel is from 1989, which does not contain a critical apparatus. My critical edition will not only bring Caird’s novel out of print and make it more accessible to scholars of Anglophone literature, but also situate the novel against the backdrop of current scholarship on British literature, gender, race, and empire.

Diana Mincyte
CUNY Research Foundation, NYC College of Technology (Brooklyn, NY 11201-1909)

HB-295418-24
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2024 – 2/28/2025

Food sovereignty in Russia’s shadow: Rethinking kinship, gender, and social reproduction on the frontiers of Europe

Research and writing leading to a book about local food production systems in Lithuania.

This project focuses on local food provisioning economies as foundational for food sovereignty. Its goal is to articulate a research agenda for studying food sovereignty through the lens of gender and labor relations. Relying on ethnographic fieldwork and public discourse analysis in Lithuania, it shows how these relations can simultaneously enable environmentally and socially sustainable food sovereignty and reify gender-based exploitation and unequal power dynamics in kinship networks. To the humanities scholarship on environmental and food resilience, this project brings a deeper understanding of the role of social and biological reproduction labor in the efforts to build socially just and environmentally sustainable food economies. Moreover, this research highlights the importance of understanding food sovereignty as a historically and geopolitically situated process.

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)
Taralee Cyphers (Project Director: November 2023 to present)

DR-299886-24
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2024 – 3/31/2025

Open-access edition of Women at Odds: Indifference, Antagonism, and Progress in Late Victorian Literature by Riya Das.

In Women at Odds, Riya Das argues for the limitations of female solidarity for the New Woman in Victorian society. She contends that while it helps to maintain the structure of the Victorian family, women cannot transcend that structure with solidarity, but rather, must embrace antagonistic relationships with their peers. While foregrounding the figure of the New Woman as a white imperialist reformer, Women at Odds claims that the New Woman movement detaches itself from the domestic politics of female friendship, either taking the form of indifferent women who refuse to compromise their own material security, or appearing as direct antagonism from women who erect firm classist, moralist, and racist barriers to safeguard their elite feminist circles. In this way, the fin-de-siècle New Woman engenders feminist progress within the national boundaries of Britain while widening the socio-economic gap between herself and lower-class, sexual, and colonial women.

Women Make Movies, Inc. (New York, NY 10001-5059)
Grace Wang (Project Director: December 2023 to present)

TT-300514-24
Short Documentaries
Public Programs

Award transferred from TT-285462-22

Totals:
$149,963 (approved)
$149,963 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2022 – 10/31/2024

Instrumental: The Elayne Jones Story

No project description available

Anthea Kraut
Regents of the University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

HB-288189-23
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2023 – 6/30/2024

Hollywood Dance-ins and the Reproduction of Corporeality

Research and writing leading to a book about Hollywood film musicals of the 1940s to the 1960s and the “dance-in,” a dancer who rehearsed a star’s choreography prior to filming.

This project proposes that a figure who barely registers in film studies or dance studies can help us re-think the body. The book will be the first scholarly study of the dance-in, a dancer who rehearsed a star’s choreography prior to filming and often served multiple unseen roles, including choreographer’s assistant and dance coach. Rarely if ever credited, dance-ins illuminate the acts of reproduction that lay concealed behind filmic images of seemingly autonomous dancing bodies. The book examines these acts of reproduction, focusing on the relationship between a handful of Hollywood stars and dance-ins from the 1940s to the 1960s, during the “Golden Age” of Hollywood musicals. While stars in this era were predominantly white and choreographers predominantly male, attention to dance-ins reveals a more complicated raced and gendered ecosystem of bodies in Hollywood. Ultimately, the book shows how the labor of dance-ins has functioned to uphold the fiction of white corporeal autonomy.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: April 2022 to present)

DR-288671-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
12/1/2022 – 11/30/2023

Infamous Bodies: Early Black Women's Celebrity and the Afterlives of Rights

The countless retellings and reimaginings of the private and public lives of Phillis Wheatley, Sally Hemings, Sarah Baartman, Mary Seacole, and Sarah Forbes Bonetta have transformed them into difficult cultural and black feminist icons. In Infamous Bodies, Samantha Pinto explores how histories of these black women and their ongoing fame generate new ways of imagining black feminist futures. Drawing on a variety of media, cultural, legal, and critical sources, Pinto shows how the narratives surrounding these eighteenth- and nineteenth-century celebrities shape key political concepts such as freedom, consent, contract, citizenship, and sovereignty. Whether analyzing Wheatley's fame in relation to conceptions of race and freedom, notions of consent in Hemings's relationship with Thomas Jefferson, or Baartman's ability to enter into legal contracts, Pinto reveals the centrality of race, gender, and sexuality in the formation of political rights.

Lynn Kaye
Brandeis University (Waltham, MA 02453-2728)

FEL-288736-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2024 – 7/31/2025

Power and the People: Lay People's Voices in Ancient Jewish Adjudication

Research and writing towards a book on interactions between judges and lay advocates in the Babylonian Talmud (6th century CE).

This project establishes the cross-cultural significance of narratives depicting exchanges between lay people and judges in the Babylonian Talmud, the foundation of Jewish law (6th c. CE). Adjudication narratives, ubiquitous in the Talmud, typically comprise only case details and the verdict. However, some interactions between petitioner and judge brim with drama, evoking the human stakes of court cases. The purpose of these details and their impact on the law is yet unexamined. Reading the stories both from literary critical, and comparative legal perspectives, foregrounds the creativity of lay people, and their subtle subversions of authority. The project has implications beyond Jewish studies. The roles of religious courts in the Roman and Persian empires are germane to studies of legal pluralism, classical studies, Christian history, and comparative religion. Exposing the dynamics between experts and lay people enriches the study of gender, narrative, and power in the humanities.

Caroline M. Riley
Unaffiliated independent scholar

FEL-288833-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2023 – 6/30/2024

Thérèse Bonney and the Power of Global Syndicated Photography

Research and writing leading to a book on the life and works of photojournalist and entrepreneur Thérèse Bonney (1894-1978).

My book on Therese Bonney (1894–1978), a prolific photographer, collector, curator, filmmaker, humanitarian, and American spy, explores how Americans learned about international conflicts through the syndication of her photographs. Concerns over syndication still test democracies today, as they rely on the transmission of accurate news to inform voters and hold leaders to account. She founded the Bonney Service in 1922, the first American illustrated press service in Europe. Through it, she dispersed photographs taken in nineteen countries to a global market of thirty-three nations. Her biography and artistic practice reveal her invention of longlasting cultural categories around gender and social justice. Her photographic and business innovations also permitted the dissemination of Bonney herself as a professional woman artist. Through these photographs and her curatorial work, she contributed to the histories of gender, modernism, journalism, photography, and warfare.

Prisca Gayles
University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)

FEL-288991-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2023 – 7/31/2024

An Ethnography of Argentina’s Black Social Movement

Research and writing leading to a book on how contemporary Argentinian activists have changed and engaged with the country’s pervasive denial of Black history and anti-Black sentiment.

My research explores how Blackness is politicized across the African diaspora and used as a tool to demand racial justice in spaces of Black invisibility. Taking Argentina as a case study, I employ a multi-year ethnography to explore how activists grapple with a history of erasure and denial of an Argentinian Black past and present to raise consciousness, increase social movement participation, and mobilize resources. At the state-level, I illustrate the role of a society’s collective emotional response to historical events in galvanizing support. At the interpersonal level, my research demonstrates that Black women succeed at growing movement participation and solidarity by utilizing transnational Black feminist politics to convert experiences of pain into purpose. This book will be of interests to scholars of social movements, race and ethnicity, and gender studies. It will also be of interest to general readers interested in Latin America and the African Diaspora.

Maria Sonevytsky
Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504-9800)

FEL-289096-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 8/31/2023

Singing for Lenin in Soviet Ukraine: Children, Music, and the Communist Future

Research and writing leading to a book about Soviet education and children’s musical practices in Soviet Ukraine, from 1934 to 1991.

Spectacles of musical childhood were widespread in Soviet life. Children’s groups performed at political events, factories, and international festivals. They were showcased on Soviet radio and television and institutionalized in "Palaces of Pioneers." Inculcating children into Soviet norms of citizenship, gender, and musicality was a vital project to ensure the longevity of the USSR, yet both children and music present unruly vectors through which to achieve the goals of norming. My research follows the “imperial turn” in Soviet historiography to Soviet Ukraine, where I interpret the dynamic arena of children’s musical practices through newly discovered archival materials and original interviews. My research reveals how Soviet Ukrainian children and their educators creatively recast the prerogatives of Soviet education, with its promise of a stateless Communist future. Soviet Ukrainian children’s music captures the tensions inherent in imposing Soviet ideology on musical practice.

Jennifer Lynn Stoever
SUNY Research Foundation, Binghamton (Binghamton, NY 13902-4400)

FEL-289221-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2023 – 1/31/2024

Living Room Revolutions: Black and Brown Women Collecting Records, Selecting Sounds, and Making New Worlds in the 1970s Bronx and Beyond

Research and writing leading to a book about hip hop history, showing how the record collections and home-DJ practices of Black women and Latinas in the 1970s Bronx shaped the artform’s birth, sound, and development.

This project enacts a paradigm shift in hip hop history, showing how the record collections and home-DJ selecting practices of Black women and Latinas in the 1970s Bronx dramatically shaped the artform’s birth, sound, and development. Through archival evidence, textual analysis, and a new oral history archive co-created with Bronx women, this book performs three interventions: reconceiving gender in hip hop historiography, rethinking the figure of the “mother” in popular music studies and record collecting culture, and documenting the selecting practices of Black women and Latinas. In narrating their lives and relationships to music, Bronx women reveal how they used records to create new forms of identity, motherhood, and family structures, as well as how crucial their collecting and selecting have been to major social, political, and artistic movements in the United States.

Lara Vapnek
St. John's University, New York (Queens, NY 11439-9000)

FEL-289441-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 4/30/2024

Mothers, Milk, and Money: A History of Infant Feeding in the United States, 1850s-Present

Research and writing leading to a book on the history of infant feeding practices in U.S. from the 19th century to the present with a focus on women of color.

As any new parent knows, the labor of feeding a baby, whether by breast or by bottle, can be intense and unremitting. Normed primarily as women’s work, the history of infant feeding provides an opportunity to investigate the shifting and unstable boundary between women’s paid and unpaid labor. By reconstructing the diverse practices of infant feeding in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present, Mothers, Milk, and Money reveals how motherhood was shaped by differences of gender, race, and class. Moving beyond the breast versus bottle paradigm that structures the current literature, I show how breast-feeding and bottle-feeding co-existed and changed over time, incorporating new technologies, and responding to women’s growing presence in the paid labor force. Furthermore, I diversify the history of motherhood by highlighting how social welfare programs shaped poor women’s options for feeding their babies.

Elisa Jaimee Oh
Howard University (Washington, DC 20059-0001)

HB-289526-23
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$40,000 (approved)
$40,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 8/31/2023

Choreographies of Race and Gender: Dance, Travel, and Ritual in Early Modern English Literature, 1558-1668

Research and writing to complete a book analyzing race and gender hierarchies through representations of dance and movement in the sixteenth and seventeenth century English literature.

Choreographies of Race and Gender: Dance, Travel, and Ritual in Early Modern English Literature 1558-1668 illuminates the formation of racial and gendered hierarchies through patterns of physical movement through space, including dance, geographical travel, and secular and religious rituals. Critical attention to embodied movement in literary texts such as William Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Macbeth, Ben Jonson’s court masques, and Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus as well as travel narratives like John Smith’s account of Pocahontas reveals dynamic paradigms that create and perpetuate ideas of human difference. This book project will contribute to the Humanities a kinesic analysis of early modern English ideologies of colonial encounters, enslavement, witchcraft, upward mobility, liturgical reform, and gendered conduct. Beyond literature, the interpretive focus on motion will interest interdisciplinary scholars and students of dance, colonialism, race, gender, and performance.

Jesse Schwartz
CUNY Research Foundation, LaGuardia Community College (Long Island City, NY 11101-3007)

HB-289596-23
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2023 – 5/31/2024

America's Russia: The Bolshevik Revolution, Eurasianism, and the Race of Radicalism

Research and writing for a book examining the origins and shifts of American political perceptions of Russia as captured in print culture from the 19th and 20th centuries. 

This project outlines the prehistories of Eurasian philosophy, its ideological uses within Russia, and, just as importantly, how this set of ideas was reworked and repurposed in the US in ways that contoured not only in relations with Moscow but also had vast consequences for domestic movements concerned with economic justice and racial equality. First outlining the historical racialized "othering" of Russia vis-a-vis Europe, I then examine how early twentieth century reactionary forces in the US mobilized against movements for racial equality, gender parity, or economic justice by deploying the specter of communism to conflate non-whiteness with activist politics. I then examine the myriad ways that American and US-based writers of various races, ethnicities, genders, sexual orientations, and creeds recognized, critiqued, and reworked this conflation in the service of liberation for all.

David Wheat
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)

FEL-289625-23
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2023 – 7/31/2024

The Atlantic Itineraries of Afro-Caribbean Entrepreneur Catalina de los Santos, c.1590-1600

Research and writing leading to a book on the social history of race and gender in the Afro-Caribbean Atlantic World of the 1590s.

This book retraces the remarkable itineraries of an Afro-Caribbean merchant and widow named Catalina de los Santos during the 1590s. After purchasing a 100-ton vessel in the Azores, she traveled aboard her ship to Seville and the Canary Islands in Spain's Indies fleet, returning to the Caribbean several years later. As a transregional social history, this book uses her story to reconstruct the experiences of free women of African descent in the Greater Antilles, the Azores, and the Canary Islands during the second half of the sixteenth century. It emphasizes ways their lives were shaped by diverse forms of oceanic traffic that linked these archipelagos to one another and to Seville, and the influences that these women in turn exercised within their communities. In so doing, this book contributes to our understanding of the Caribbean, the Azores, and the Canary Islands in the late 1500s as interconnected spaces located at the center of multiple, overlapping maritime circuits.

Portland State University (Portland, OR 97207-0751)
Alexander Sager (Project Director: May 2022 to present)
Deborah Smith Arthur (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)
Charles H. Klein (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)
Monica Mueller (Co Project Director: August 2022 to present)

AA-289984-23
Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities
Education Programs

Totals:
$149,989 (approved)
$149,989 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2023 – 1/31/2025

Identity, Transformation, and Agency: The Humanities Inside Oregon’s Only Prison for Women

A two-year project to expand the university’s Higher Education in Prison program.

We will design and implement a 6 course (24 credit hour) humanities sequence around the theme of Identity, Transformation and Agency for incarcerated women, trans-identified and gender nonconforming people at the Coffee Creek Correctional facility to enrich and expand Portland State University’s Higher Education in Prison Program. Faculty from six departments (Anthropology, Black Studies, Chicano & Latino Studies, English, Indigenous Nations Studies, and Philosophy) will participate in a community of practice to create student-centered, engaging, and rigorous curriculum along a Liberal Studies degree pathway.

University of Houston System (Victoria, TX 77901-5731)
Kyoko Amano (Project Director: May 2022 to present)
Nadya Pittendrigh (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)
Justin Bell (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)
Saba Razvi (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

AC-290005-23
Humanities Initiatives at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Education Programs

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2023 – 4/30/2026

Interdisciplinary Humanities for a Diverse Campus: Building Minors in Race, Gender, and Disability Studies

The creation of interdisciplinary minors in three areas: race and ethnic studies, women and gender studies, and disability studies. 

The UHV College of Liberal Arts and Social Science will develop, implement and evaluate three minor curricula for Race and Ethics Studies, Women and Gender Studies, and Disability Studies.

Elizabeth Brownson
University of Wisconsin, Parkside (Kenosha, WI 53144-1133)

FT-290685-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/9/2023 – 9/8/2023

Colonizing Health: Gender and the Politics of Reproductive Healthcare in British Mandate Palestine and Colonial Sudan 1921-54

Research at Durham University’s Sudan Archive and writing an article analyzing midwifery and health policies affecting women in Mandate Palestine and Colonial Sudan. The arrival of western medicine in the colonized world brought new male authority and restrictions over women’s health and bodies. Lessons from colonial health policy could inform today’s struggles over women’s access to reproductive care. Also, my students are most interested in studies that explore the lives of nonelites and women, but we have few on Palestine or Sudan from this era. My project fills this gap by examining the impact of colonial medicine on women’s health care and gender constructs in Palestine and Sudan under British rule. I will analyze midwifery courses, legislation, and regulations that reshaped midwives’ work, as well as their responses. My project will contribute to scholarship on social history, the Middle East, gender and empire, colonial medicine, and Palestinian and Sudanese women’s studies.

Kelly Kaelin
University of Southern Indiana (Evansville, IN 47719-0227)

FT-290913-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 7/31/2023

Moravian Missionaries, Gender and Race in the 18th Century Caribbean

Writing a book on women’s participation in the 18th-century Moravian churches of the Caribbean. 

This project examines women missionaries from the American-German Moravian Church and their efforts to convert enslaved Black women in Danish and British Caribbean colonies throughout the 18th Century. I argue that Moravian theology created a space for sex-segregated ministry, in which American and European women proselytized to enslaved Black women in feminized spaces such as sickbeds and birthing chambers. Through my analysis of baptismal records and letters written by enslaved converts, I found that these island congregations were majority female, leading to a new understanding of the beginnings of Black Christianity. This project has important bearing on our understanding of Black Christianity in North America and the place of Black women within the hierarchy of these congregations both before and after Emancipation.

Hollie Nyseth Nzitatira
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)

FT-290917-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/15/2023 – 8/14/2023

Reentry and Reintegration of People Convicted of Genocide

Completion of a monograph on the post-prison reintegration of people convicted of genocide in Rwanda, based on interviews with 200 individuals both before and after being released from jail.

This book addresses the reentry and reintegration of people who were convicted of genocide. While much scholarship assesses the reentry and reintegration of formerly incarcerated individuals, research has yet to analyze what happens when people labeled as genocidaires return to their communities. I interviewed 200 Rwandans before they left prison and twice after they returned home. I also conducted interviews with their spouses, as well as with 75 community members to assess how they view the return of people who were convicted of genocide. Findings highlight the importance of the location of blame and of rituals for people returning to their communities, as well as how aspects of social location (e.g., gender) shape the narratives of redemption available to people who were convicted of genocide. The project also provides important insights into the lived realities of people in societies recovering from genocide.

University of Missouri System (Columbia, MO 65211-3020)
Kerri McBee-Black (Project Director: August 2022 to present)
Li Zhao (Co Project Director: April 2023 to present)
Julie Elman (Co Project Director: April 2023 to present)

AKA-290963-23
Humanities Connections Planning
Education Programs

Totals:
$34,993 (approved)
$34,993 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 5/31/2024

Developing a Disability Studies Minor: Connecting Existing Structures through Inclusive Curriculum

A one-year faculty and curricular development project to create an interdisciplinary disability studies minor  

Developing a Disability Studies Minor: Connecting Existing Structures through Inclusive Curriculum is a project that aims to develop a replicable humanities-focused DS model program for implementing an inclusive curriculum in the College of Art and Science (CAS) at the University of Missouri. This project will build on and enhance the CAS' diverse strengths to create a minor focusing on courses within the humanities and literary criticism, philosophy, rhetoric, history, anthropology, media and cultural studies, black studies, women's and gender studies, political science, psychology, sociology, theatre, textile and apparel management, political science, and communication. This project will plan to create a disability studies minor for undergraduate students, focusing on courses within the humanities and the social sciences that connect the humanities with STEM and applied science majors across campus.

Victoria Papa
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts (North Adams, MA 01247-4100)

FT-291450-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 7/31/2023

Aesthetics of Survival: Counternarratives of Trauma in American Modernist Literature

Research and writing of a monograph examining how early twentieth century American authors expand representations of trauma.

Almost one-hundred years ago, modernists writing from the margins of a literary movement—or those who wrote about race, gender, sexuality, class, and ability—provided a counternarrative to the dominant psychoanalytic theory of trauma. “Aesthetics of Survival: Counternarratives of Trauma in American Modernist Literature” traces this alternative history to argue that American authors of the 1920s to 1940s—including Richard Bruce Nugent, Langston Hughes, H.D, Lola Ridge, Djuna Barnes, and Zora Neale Hurston—wrote out of the experience of social injustice to expand representations of trauma. Rather than locate trauma in major catastrophe, sudden accidents, and the imminent threat of physical death, as Sigmund Freud did in his work, these writers depict the impact of durational, intersectional, and collective violences to ultimately emphasize resiliency in the face of oppression.

Ann Marie Gaul
University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)

FT-291451-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 7/31/2023

Red Nightshade: Tomatoes and the Making of Modern Egypt

Research and writing of a book about the development of modern Egypt through the historical importance of the tomato.

Red Nightshade: Tomatoes and the Making of Modern Egypt reassesses dominant narratives about modernity and nationalism through a history of the tomato in Egypt. The book argues that the Egyptian nation, and the interlocking formations of gender, class, race, and ethnicity that define it, came into being through everyday domestic practices like buying, cooking, and eating food. In order to understand how the hierarchies that order our world came to be, the project insists that we reject hierarchies of knowledge that dismiss cooking and other domestic labor as inconsequential. Thus, Red Nightshade considers recipes and culinary practice alongside forms of cultural production like fiction, film, and caricature to examine how domestic and culinary labor intersected with state policies about nutrition and food supply. A Summer Stipend would support writing the book’s final chapter, which examines how Egyptians have used humor about the tomato to question and critique state authority.

Erin Austin Dwyer
Oakland University (Rochester, MI 48309-4402)

FT-291487-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2023 – 6/30/2023

Gender, Poison, and Slavery in the Atlantic World, 1677-1865

Writing a book on slavery and poison in the Atlantic World.

Poison has been called “a woman’s weapon” in fiction and historical records. During a poisoning crisis in Martinique an official noted that “poison is the weapon of the weak, employed by slaves, women and children.” He meant that poison was cowardly, but I argue that poison was a tool for disempowered people who could not resort to open, physical force. “Gender, Poison, and Slavery in the Atlantic World, 1677-1865" focuses on enslaved people accused of poisoning, their fears, motives, and hopes. Enslaved women were disproportionately charged with the crime, often as revenge for sexual violence, so the chapter examines the role of gender in accusations and convictions, including when enslaved couples conspired together to poison an owner or overseer. Comparing examples from the United States and the Caribbean demonstrates the intersection of emotional, sexual, and gendered politics that lies at the core of poisoning cases in the Atlantic World from 1677 to 1865.

Michelle Cassidy
Central Michigan University (Mount Pleasant, MI 48859-0001)

FT-291491-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/10/2024 – 7/9/2024

Indigenous Veterans and their Families after the U.S. Civil War

Research leading to a book on Indigenous veterans, their families, and their communities following the Civil War (1865-1920).

This project compares pension applications from Indigenous applicants in New York, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Indian Territory to tell stories of Native American veterans of the U.S. Army, their families, and broader communities after the U.S. Civil War. Indigenous veterans and their families faced increasing pressure on their land bases, including allotment policies. As Indigenous women dealt with the loss of sons and husbands, they also navigated federal Indian policies. Using race and gender as analytical frameworks to compare Indigenous applicants’ experiences to Black and rural white applicants, this project will contribute to our understanding of veterans and the Civil War era. The project explores the challenges Indigenous applicants faced during a period in which political rights were debated and both African American and Indigenous people struggled to make a place for themselves in post-war society and to strive for “A More Perfect Union.”

Mollie Elizabeth Barnes
University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC 29208-0001)

FT-291509-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2023 – 7/31/2023

Real-Life Heroines: How Women Reformers Wrote One Another’s Lives in the Sea Islands, 1838– 1902

Research and writing of a book on how women reformers in the Sea Islands of South Carolina historicized their peers in journals, diaries, biographies, and other forms of life writing.

Real-Life Heroines studies how women reformers in the Sea Islands historicized their peers in various forms of life writing: journals, diaries, biographies. I study how race and gender intersect in women’s textual representations of one another and argue that white women reformers’ mostly do-good meddling, mediating, and writing on behalf of enslaved/liberated Black women in fact often silenced or compromised them. I demonstrate how Black women reclaim and transform life writing on their own terms. What once seemed like knots I couldn’t untangle—what problems arise when white women narrate Black women’s lives? where and how were Black women documenting one another?—actually became my most important throughlines: tensions, silences, revisions, and even painful erasures that white women powerbrokers triggered within print-culture networks designed to protect Black women. Real-Life Heroines then amplifies and studies life writing that Black women published as counternarratives.

Jessica Linker, PhD
Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)

FT-291761-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
5/1/2023 – 6/30/2023

The Fruits of Their Labor: The Work of Early American Scientific Women, 1750-1860

Research and writing leading to a book on women’s scientific practices and redefinitions of science in early America. 

This monograph unsettles assertions that few women practiced science in early America, arguing that the erasure of women’s labor in this period (1750-1860) was both contemporaneous and retroactive, occurring as science was redefined in opposition to women’s gendered roles. I examine gender-based disparities in eighteenth and nineteenth-century scientific societies, in book production, in education, and in archives themselves. The project aims to understand the ways that race and class converged with gender to determine how and when women could be acknowledged as scientific practitioners. I recover the work of understudied women while assessing the historical construction of gender bias in scientific networks and practice – essentially, the book lays out the early modern origins of the modern-day gender gap in science fields.

Martha Anne Sprigge
University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0001)

FT-291855-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2023 – 9/30/2023

Musical Widowhood and the Gendered Labor of Mourning in Postwar Germany

Research leading to a book about German art music after World War II, with a focus on mourning practices and the role played by composers’ spouses in posthumously organizing musical archives and establishing legacies.

This project examines how gendered mourning practices influenced the world of German art music after World War II. It focuses on musical widows: women who were married to composers and who maintained their husband’s archives after their deaths. In both East and West Germany, the status of women and national memorial culture underwent dramatic transformations after World War II. By centering the women who performed the memorial labors that forged artists’ posthumous legacies, this project reveals how longstanding cross-cultural femininized mourning customs were adapted to suit new socio-political contexts throughout the upheavals of Germany’s twentieth century. The project analyzes musical archives as sites of mourning and thereby shows that although the world of postwar German art music was dominated by men, its historiography was shaped by their wives. _Musical Widowhood_ thus offers a feminist approach to understanding the intimate ties that sustain composers’ material legacies.

Emily Skidmore
Texas Tech University System (Lubbock, TX 79409-0006)

FT-292368-23
Summer Stipends
Research Programs

Totals:
$6,000 (approved)
$6,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/11/2023 – 8/10/2023

Breastfeeding Advocacy, Race, Class and American Parenthood, 1940-Present

No project description available

Southern Illinois University (Carbondale, IL 62901-4302)
Amy J. Etcheson (Project Director: November 2022 to present)
Kristine Priddy (Co Project Director: February 2023 to present)

DR-292377-23
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
4/1/2023 – 9/30/2024

Open-Access Edition of Utopian Genderscapes by Michelle C. Smith

In Utopian Genderscapes, author Michelle C. Smith explores the interconnected rhetoricity of gender, class, and work through the case studies of three nineteenth-century utopian communities: Transcendentalist Brook Farm, the Harmony Society, and the Oneida Community. By looking at the networks of bodies, spaces, objects, and discourses that defined women’s work in these distinct communities, Smith reveals how labor was not only gendered but also raced and classed. These communities offer evidence of how industrialization differentiated labor across gender, class, and race and what gender reforms were thinkable in the mid-nineteenth century. This innovative rhetorical history advances valuable lessons for contemporary discussions in the discipline of teleological rhetorics, rhetorics of exceptionalism, and rhetorics of choice.

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Tansen Sen (Project Director: November 2022 to present)
Arunabh Ghosh (Co Project Director: September 2023 to present)
Gal Gvili (Co Project Director: October 2023 to present)

RZ-292626-23
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$244,624 (approved)
$244,624 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2026

China and India in an Age of Decolonization: An Analysis of the Nehru Papers, 1947-1964

Preparation of a digital archive and open-access edited volume on Indian - Chinese relations during the Cold War based on the papers of Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964). (36 months)

This project is submitted to the Scholarly Digital Projects category. It offers new perspectives on the early Cold War era by studying interactions between China and India. Our work pivots around the analysis and digitization of China-related materials from the recently declassified papers of Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964), India’s first Prime Minister. These documents reorient existing narratives of the Cold War by illuminating China-India as a critical nexus which foregrounds an intra-Asian perspective in global histories of the 1950s. Studies of China-India exchange have largely focused on International Relations. In contrast, employing diverse disciplinary perspectives we will develop a digital archive and a peer reviewed open-access edited volume that will provide new understandings of issues that hold historical and contemporary significance, including scientific development, food security, gender and social equity, and popular culture.

Benoit Denizet-Lewis
Emerson College (Boston, MA 02116-4624)

FZ-292729-23
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2024 – 12/31/2024

We Don't Know You Anymore: Identity Change in America

Writing a book about why Americans choose to change their identities, and how such changes are embraced or rejected by others.

“We Don’t Know You Anymore,” a book under contract with William Morrow in the United States and Penguin Books in the UK, is an ambitious exploration of transformation and identity change in 20th and 21st century America. What does it mean to become a “new person,” and who gets to decide whether an identity change is legitimate? What are the limits and ethics of self-identification when identity is increasingly understood to be malleable and self-constructed? And what is the relationship between personal and societal transformation? I build on the scholarship of theorists from diverse fields—including philosophy, history, and gender and sexuality studies—to show that our experience of altering our most personal characteristics is influenced by deeply politicized and often incoherent beliefs about who is changeable, and who has earned or forfeited the right to redemption or reinvention.

Emory University (Atlanta, GA 30322-1018)
Kristin Wendland (Project Director: November 2022 to present)

RZ-292797-23
Collaborative Research
Research Programs

Totals:
$49,312 (approved)
$49,312 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2024 – 12/31/2024

Tango in the Humanities: Examining a Multidimensional Art Form Across Disciplinary and Geographic Boundaries

A three-day conference at Emory University exploring how historical, political, and cultural norms have shaped tango as a transnational art form in the 20th and 21st centuries. (12 months)

This convening project will organize and host an interdisciplinary conference of international scholars and scholar-artists on tango. The project is centered on broadening the scholarly discourse on tango, its history, its influence on culture and society, and its application by uniting twenty-three scholars from around the world and of a variety of humanistic disciplines, including race and gender studies, political history, musicology, anthropology, ethnomusicology, dance history, and performance. The primary product of this project is a three-day conference at Emory University in Atlanta, GA in November 2024. A subsequent product will be a digital project consisting of building a website through the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship of the workshopped and edited conference papers and presentations in spring 2025. With these two outcomes, we expect to provide a model of how an art form like the tango is studied as a humanities concept and reinvigorates the human experience.

Tanya E. Erzen
University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, WA 98416-5000)

FZ-292808-23
Public Scholars
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2024 – 6/30/2025

Runaways, Delinquents and Unruly Girls: The Long History of Gender and Incarceration

Research and writing of a book on gender, girlhood, and incarceration in Washington State between 1915 and the 1990s.    

"Unruly Girls" is the untold story of the imprisonment of girls in Washington and nationally using documents from the Washington State archives that no one has requested in at least twenty years. Through the stories of three girls at different time periods, the book tells a broader story about how the state has punished girls who lived outside the bounds of what society deemed appropriate gender and sexual behavior.

Mattress Factory Ltd. (Pittsburgh, PA 15212-4444)
Sarah Hallett (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

PG-293172-23
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 3/31/2024

The Greer Lankton Collection: Preserving the work of transgender artist Greer Lankton (1958-1996)

A preservation assessment of 15,000 items including artwork, ephemera, periodicals, photographs, journals, films, books, and correspondence documenting the life and work of American artist Greer Lankton.

The Greer Lankton Collection is an assemblage of materials comprising over 15,000 items including artwork, ephemera, periodicals, photographs, photo albums, slides and negatives, journals, correspondence, books, film, and personal objects which document the life and work of American transgender artist, Greer Lankton. The collection highlights how this seminal artist related to issues of sexuality, gender-identity, transfeminism, iconography, pop culture and consumerism, alongside battles with abuse, mental health issues, anorexia, drug addiction, and the AIDS crisis which surrounded her. The Mattress Factory proposes a General Preservation Assessment of its Greer Lankton Collection to be conducted by the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts. This assessment will provide the museum with a general evaluation of the collection's preservation needs. It will also provide observations and recommendations to guide the museum in the development of a comprehensive preservation plan.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Wesley Hogan (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Jennifer Lawson (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)
Emilye J. Crosby (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

GG-293183-23
Humanities Discussions
Public Programs

Totals:
$349,991 (approved)
$349,991 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 8/31/2025

SNCC and Grassroots Organizing: Building a More Perfect Union

Implementation of a discussion series at HBCUs and museums on the history of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

The Movement History Initiative in collaboration with six historically black colleges and universities plans "SNCC and Grassroots Organizing: Building a More Perfect Union," a public discussion series examining central themes in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's (SNCC) grassroots organizing--the organizing tradition, voting rights, Black Power, women and gender, freedom teaching, and art and culture in movement building--and their contemporary relevance to the ongoing project of building a more perfect union. The series includes multi-day community gatherings at HBCUs, workshops at civil rights/African American museums, and virtual community conversations where humanities scholars and movement veterans engage a broad public audience in rich humanities resources. New developed Interpretive Booklets and Learning Toolkits with primary source materials, analysis, and questions will provide further opportunities to engage.

Center for Independent Documentary, Inc. (Boston, MA 02135-1032)
Marisa Fox (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

TR-293282-23
Media Projects Production
Public Programs

Totals:
$590,615 (approved)
$590,615 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 10/31/2024

"My Underground Mother": A Feature-length Documentary that Explores the Lives and Legacies of Survivors of Jewish Women's Slave Labor During the Holocaust

Production of a feature-length documentary about Jewish female slave labor during the Holocaust using as a lens one daughter’s journey to uncover her mother’s past. 

Production of "My Underground Mother," a feature-length documentary that explores the untold story of Jewish women's slave labor during the Holocaust through a daughter's search for her late mother's past, a collective camp diary in which she wrote and interviews with dozens of women survivors who reveal the gender-based violence they suffered and hid from their own families.

American Folk Art Museum (Long Island City, NY 11101-2409)
Andreane Balconi (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

PG-293465-23
Preservation Assistance Grants
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$10,000 (approved)
$10,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 2/28/2025

Digital Preservation Assessment and Storage Project

A digital preservation assessment of the American Folk Art Museum’s 5,200 digitized objects as well as the purchase of a RAID 6 hard-drive system and onsite firewall to house and preserve the collection.

AFAM requests funding to commission a digital preservation assessment from the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC). The Museum has digitized a substantial portion of our art and archival collections and is planning further digitization projects to fulfil our 2021-2026 Strategic Plan’s commitment to increasing access to our holdings and advancing our institution through a lens of diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion. The NEDCC assessment will enable Collections staff to prepare and implement a long-term preservation plan that ensures our growing digital collections remain accessible to future generations. Wide and sustained access to digital resources related to folk and self-taught art will diversify the public’s understanding of America’s cultural heritage; offer alternative perspectives on entrenched national narratives; and shed new light on broad humanities themes such as race, gender, sexuality, religion, community, family, and the aesthetics of daily life.

Boston University (Boston, MA 02215-1300)
Stephan E. Ellenwood (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Karen Harris (Co Project Director: February 2023 to present)

ES-293642-23
Institutes for K-12 Educators
Education Programs

Totals:
$175,000 (approved)
$175,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Friendship and Identity in Literature, Film, and Adolescence

A two-week residential institute for 25 high school educators on how friendship is understood, portrayed, and experienced through literature, film, and multidisciplinary perspectives.

This innovative institute invites English teachers (grades 9-12) to examine how the universal human connection of friendship is understood, portrayed, and experienced from literary, social, cultural, theoretical, and pedagogical perspectives. As a formative and abiding feature of adolescence, friendship is of special curricular interest in the high school English classroom. Through literature, film, and secondary sources, teachers will explore evolving conceptions of friendship, and examine cultural/social contexts and factors including gender, race, class, loyalty, reciprocity, social media, and power dynamics. Teachers will collaborate with colleagues, learn from interdisciplinary guest scholars, and develop curricular materials to help their students become more grounded and nuanced readers of friendship in literature and in their own lives. (Designed for English teachers but will welcome up to three teacher-participants in other humanities subjects.)

Trustees of St. Joseph's College (Standish, ME 04084-5236)
Wendy Galgan (Project Director: February 2023 to present)
Christopher Fuller (Co Project Director: February 2023 to present)

EH-293710-23
Institutes for Higher Education Faculty
Education Programs

Totals:
$120,926 (approved)
$120,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Place, Race, and Gender in New England Gothic Literature

A three-week residential institute for 25 higher education faculty members to study New England Gothic literature with a focus on race, place, and gender.

This three-week institute examines the abiding cultural influence of the Puritans on New England Gothic Literature, with a particular focus on horror. Participants in this institute will explore this topic through the lenses of place, race, and gender. The curriculum will demonstrate for participants how accounting for these socio-cultural factors can enrich the learning experiences of their students, as well as provide ways to link early American history to contemporary discourses about American identity.

Rice University (Houston, TX 77005-1827)
Kirsten Anne Ostherr (Project Director: February 2023 to present)

DOI-293791-23
Dangers and Opportunities of Technology: Perspectives from the Humanities (Individuals)
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2024 – 12/31/2024

The Visual History of Computational Health

Research and development of a scholarly monograph on the history of the computational approaches to healthcare, 1960s-2000s. 

This project seeks to determine the implicit humanistic values embedded in the design and use of healthcare technologies. Through archival research and analysis of audiovisual media produced by medical professionals and technology developers, this project will explain how early ideas about emerging healthcare technologies transformed patient care by envisioning human bodies as quantitative data. This move not only excluded the messy, non-linear, emotional, and unpredictable aspects of embodied illness experiences, it also excluded the experiences of gendered, racialized, and minoritized patients. By examining how future uses of computers in healthcare were imagined from the 1960s onward, this project will show how the development of computational approaches to patient care worked precisely by erasing the human elements of illness and healing. A resulting book manuscript, The Visual History of Computational Health, will narrate the throughline from these early imaginings to the present.

Duke University (Durham, NC 27705-4677)
Dean J. Smith (Project Director: March 2022 to present)

DR-288240-22
Fellowships Open Book Program
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$5,500 (approved)
$5,500 (awarded)

Grant period:
8/1/2022 – 7/31/2023

It's Been Beautiful: Soul! And Black Power Television

Soul! was where Stevie Wonder and Earth, Wind & Fire got funky, where Toni Morrison read from her debut novel, where James Baldwin and Nikki Giovanni discussed gender and power, and where Amiri Baraka and Stokely Carmichael enjoyed a sympathetic forum for their radical politics. Broadcast on public television between 1968 and 1973, Soul!, helmed by pioneering producer and frequent host Ellis Haizlip, connected an array of black performers and public figures with a black viewing audience. In It's Been Beautiful, Gayle Wald tells the story of Soul!, casting this influential but overlooked program as a bold and innovative use of television to represent and critically explore black identity, culture, and feeling during a transitional period in the black freedom struggle.

Riya Das
Prairie View A & M University (Prairie View, TX 77445-6850)

HB-281426-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
6/1/2022 – 5/31/2023

Women at Odds: Indifference, Antagonism, and Progress in Late Victorian Literature

Research and writing leading to a book reassessing female solidarity in the Victorian novel.

My monograph project challenges traditional accounts of female solidarity as a driver of narrative and social success for women. By contrast, my project shows that in prominent novels of the late nineteenth century, antagonism and indifference are surprisingly effective tools for women looking to break out of traditionally defined roles. On the one hand, this antagonism disrupts the status quo in unanticipated ways—a patriarchal society that has come to expect solidarity between women finds it difficult to deal with female competition—and it helps open new domestic and professional pathways for women. On the other hand, in the effort to achieve gender equality, the professional New Woman’s rhetoric recycles distinctly sexist, racist, and classist mid-Victorian conventions, thereby bringing middle-class Englishwomen dialectically into the labor pool of the British empire, even as they resist patriarchal institutions.

Valerie M. Fridland
University of Nevada, Reno (Reno, NV 89557-0001)

FEL-281445-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products][Media coverage]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2022

I Hate When You Say That! Exploring the rise, reign and significant cultural value of our most pilloried linguistic quirks

Research and writing leading to a book for the general reader on modern American language phenomena and how cultural resistance to such colloquial speech is indicative of larger racial, gender, generational, and class differences.

This request outlines a book project that unpacks the history behind and linguistic processes that drive what’s changing in the language around us, and the negative consequences of steadfastly adhering to a doctrine of linguistic prescriptivism and bias. Informed by a theoretical linguistic perspective but written for a lay audience, the book will argue that our most popular and pilloried linguistic quirks are really about our immense capacity for social adaptivity. Each chapter takes on a particularly maligned and misunderstood speech feature and uses it as a springboard into a larger discussion of how language changes, noting how cultural biases and language forms become interwoven. By offering historical analysis and insight from contemporary research, the book offers a unique perspective that language is more than just structure, more than just grammar, that what we tend to deride as imperfections and unwelcome changes are integral to its larger communicative purpose.

Liz Przybylski
Regents of the University of California, Riverside (Riverside, CA 92521-0001)

HB-281490-22
Awards for Faculty
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Sonic Sovereignty: G/local Hip Hop and the Shifting Popular Music Mainstream, 2008-2018

Completion of a book and two open-access articles about Indigenous hip hop musicians, media professionals and the concept of sonic sovereignty.

What does sovereignty sound like? The book Sonic Sovereignty: G/local Hip Hop and the Shifting Popular Music Mainstream answers this question through ethnographic research and media analysis undertaken with Indigenous hip hop musicians and media professionals. The research is rooted in Winnipeg, an Indigenous music broadcasting center in Canada whose resonance is heard across borders. It reveals the wide and deep impacts of Streetz FM, the first Indigenous hip hop station, and probes the forces that led to the station’s closure, even as its music continued to find popularity with audiences. I extend research that explores the racialization and gendering of urban-format popular music and detail the implications on how Indigenous artists are heard—and silenced—through popular music distribution. Musicians are actively building what I call sonic sovereignty, navigating the expectations of mainstream airplay while pushing aesthetic and political boundaries.

Kristina Marie Sessa
Ohio State University (Columbus, OH 43210-1132)

FEL-281583-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Disaster in Late Antiquity: A Cultural and Material History

Research and writing leading to a book on natural and man-made disasters in Late Antiquity (ca 250 – 700 CE).

This book is the first cultural and material study of human-made and natural disasters in Late Antiquity (ca 250 – 700 CE). Focusing on the fourth to seventh centuries CE and on the tri-continental expanse of the late Roman Empire, it places disaster at the center of analysis, and investigates how late ancient Romans from across the socio-economic spectrum variously perceived and experienced disasters like warfare, climate change, earthquakes, and pandemics. Instead of approaching disaster as the primary variable driving a predetermined narrative of “decline and fall,” this study presents a multi-scalar, differential history of disaster, and shows how it led to a variety of outcomes that were directly related to social and political status, available economic resources, religious identity, gender, and geographic location.

Sara J. Bernstein
University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN 46556-4635)

FEL-281728-22
Fellowships
Research Programs

[Grant products]

Totals:
$60,000 (approved)
$60,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
7/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

The Metaphysics of Intersectionality

Research and writing of four peer-reviewed articles on the metaphysics of social intersectional identities, drawing on the philosophy of race and feminist philosophy.

Viewing social identities as intersectional has become central to understanding how various dimensions of race, gender, sexual orientation, disability status, and class interact to form more complex forms of discrimination than those suffered by persons who fall under only one category. This project develops a comprehensive metaphysical theory of intersectional social categories and intersectional oppression, with results and applications for many disciplines.