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Funded Projects Query Form
222 matches

Grant program: Digital Humanities Advancement Grants*
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Institute For Advanced Study - Louis Bamberger And Mrs. Felix Fuld Fdn (Princeton, NJ 08540-4952)
Aaron Hershkowitz (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Nicholas Howe (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296227-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2025

Developing OCR for Squeezes: Unlocking the Text of Greek Inscriptions Using the Krateros Database

An exploratory effort to apply computer vision to a collection of 30,000 digitized epigraphic squeezes (paper negatives of inscriptions) to develop a new method for optical character recognition of Greek inscriptions.

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) has long been applied with increasing levels of accuracy to printed texts. More recently, spurred by advances in neural networks and increases in processing capability, OCR has also been applied successfully to manuscript texts, allowing for readable and searchable editions to be created for huge corpora of texts. This project will use the Institute for Advanced Study’s Krateros database, a digital collection featuring thousands of images of epigraphic squeezes—paper negatives of inscriptions—to develop OCR for Greek inscriptions. The project’s aims are to accelerate the publication of new analyses of historic Greek texts, draw critical attention to problem spots in existing transcriptions, and identify individual stonecutters’ handwriting. This innovative approach to humanities research will lay the groundwork for breakthrough discoveries that can transform our understanding of ancient history.

Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund, The (New Orleans, LA 70118-5698)
Alexis Culotta (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Aron Culotta (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296281-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,618 (approved)
$149,618 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2026

Exploring Artistic Production with the Artistic Network Toolbox (ANT)

The creation of an open-source platform for network analysis of art and artists.

We seek Level II funding to develop the Artistic Network Toolbox (ANT), an open-source, user-friendly platform for scholars and students to curate, visualize, and share the relationships between art, its creators, and its contexts. While prior digital humanities projects have shown the value of network analysis to explore artistic production, doing so required expensive, one-off software development customized for each project. Instead, the goal of ANT is to democratize access to network analysis in art historical scholarship. To do so, ANT will leverage 100% open-source technologies, providing one-click generation of a fully-functional website with no programming expertise, and making database curation as simple as editing a spreadsheet. ANT will model diverse artistic connections in a dynamic network analysis that can be customized and visualized for nuanced explorations of artistic exchange.

Stanford University (Stanford, CA 94305-2004)
Mark Algee-Hewitt (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Eric James Harvey (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296316-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,821 (approved)
$149,821 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2024 – 8/31/2025

Digital Accessibility for Blind Scholars of Antiquity

The integration of six ancient languages into an open-source Braille digital translation platform to enable the creation of digital editions and primary sources for blind and low-vision humanities students and researchers.  

Inaccessible materials have prevented blind students and scholars from participating equally in the study of ancient languages, literature, and history. The solution proposed in this project will make hundreds of thousands of primary texts available to braille readers and progress these students and scholars toward more equal footing with their sighted colleagues. Nearly every blind person with a computer or mobile device will have the same immediate access to digitized texts that sighted scholars already enjoy.

Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum (Chicago, IL 60605-2403)
Samantha Blickhan (Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296330-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,968 (approved)
$74,968 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2025

Scoping Scalable Sustainable DH Infrastructure for Online Crowdsourcing

An evaluative study of the underlying code, functionality, and user interface of Zooniverse, a free crowdsourcing platform for transcribing humanities documents.

This project will solicit feedback from users of key digital humanities resources that make up part of the Zooniverse crowdsourcing platform, as well as supporting a code audit, in preparation for plans to scale. These resources—user-facing tools for collaborative text transcription, and a browser-based application that supports viewing and editing of transcription project results—support teams using Zooniverse to crowdsource the transcription of historic documents, and help ensure that the labor provided by volunteer transcribers leads to high-quality, useable results. We are requesting a Level I Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to support an evaluative study of current Zooniverse infrastructure that supports the humanities. The information we learn from the proposed efforts will allow us to create a development and sustainability plan in service of adapting existing tools to support a wider user base, and building new features based on the needs of our current community.

University of Maryland, College Park (College Park, MD 20742-5141)
Osama Eshera (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Fateme Savadi (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)
Sajjad Nikfahm-Khubravan (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296341-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$148,591 (approved)
$148,591 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2026

Idrisi: An Open Library of Historical Geography of the Premodern Islamic World

Creation of new datasets containing geographic locations and place names extracted from transcriptions of premodern Islamic texts that will be shared with existing open-source gazetteers and machine learning transcription software that support humanities research.  

The Dabiran Project on the Intellectual History of the Islamic World, based at the University of Maryland, seeks support for creating a new subproject, the Idrisi Digital Library of Historical Geography. Under development since 2018, the Dabiran digital infrastructure supports bibliographic metadata and text-transcriptions for digital scans of premodern Islamic manuscripts. A Level II Digital Humanities Advancement Grant in the amount of $148,591 will allow for the expansion of Dabiran’s database and improve our capacity to record historical-geographical data, drawn directly from manuscripts of Islamic geographical works. This new data will be an indispensable resource for historians seeking to identify placenames and examine differences in their linguistic forms, geographical coordinates, and descriptions across various historical sources. The bibliographic and geographic data compiled will be published and archived on open-source repositories.

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (Milwaukee, WI 53211-3153)
Anne Bonds (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Derek G. Handley (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296399-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$147,412 (approved)
$147,412 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2026

Developing a Digital Platform for the Mapping Racism and Resistance in Milwaukee County Project

The development of a platform to map and visualize racial covenants in early 20th Century Milwaukee.

The Mapping Racism and Resistance project examines the critical role of racial covenants, as they worked together with other discriminatory housing practices, in restricting Black access to housing in Milwaukee County. We are seeking NEH DHAG funding to support 1) the development of a repository for data and digital assets generated in phase one of the project; 2) the creation of maps and web content visualizing racial covenants and Black resistance to restrictive covenants and other forms of housing discrimination in the early part of the 20th Century; and 3) the redesign and redevelopment of our website to support expanded public engagement with our digital resources on racial covenants and challenges to them in Milwaukee County.

Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. (Atlanta, GA 30302-3999)
Elizabeth J. West (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Joshua Jackson (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296402-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$68,750 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2025

Data Mining and Mapping Antebellum Georgia

A digital mapping project focused on determining the feasibility of using digitized genealogical records and archival state maps to identify and geolocate enslaved African Americans. 

This proposal seeks Level I funding in the amount of $75,000 to generate a relational database and map that will expand our understanding of Black life and geography during slavery in the United States. Where David Eltis’s Slave Voyages brought us to the shores and ports of the Americas, our proposed project, Data Mining and Mapping Antebellum Georgia (DMMAG) takes us inland, turning from the Trans-Atlantic to the Intra-American enslavement and forced migrations of Africans and African Americans. The goal of this proposal is to generate a scalable prototype for DMMAG’s proposed database and map, which will address the following question: to what extent can researchers use digitized genealogical archives and archival state maps to both identify and geolocate individual enslaved African Americans and their families before emancipation?

Yiddish Book Center (Amherst, MA 01002-3375)
Amber Clooney (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Mark Y. Liberman (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Seth Kulick (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296407-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$147,147 (approved)
$138,319 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2026

OCR Correction by Improving Robustness to Orthographic Variation in Yiddish, A Low Resource Language.

A partnership between the National Yiddish Book Center and the Language Data Consortium at the University of Pennsylvania to refine a method to improve error correction in optical character recognition for Yiddish.  

This proposal will support the development of an experimental system to improve error correction on the existing Yiddish Book Center optical character recognition (OCR) projects, which are the first and largest instances of OCR for Yiddish done at scale. The experimental systems will correct a 650 million word corpus (about 12,000 scanned Yiddish books) of Yiddish text produced by optical character recognition (OCR) which is available now at the Yiddish Book Center’s full-text search website (http://ocr.yiddishbookcenter.org). This corpus will double in size by 2025 upon the completion of a separate OCR project, the Universal Yiddish Library. The Universal Yiddish Library Project will add at least 10,000 additional books from multiple institutions to the existing corpus, and the OCR correction methods used for this project will be applied to the Universal Yiddish Library corpus in the future.

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Lincoln, NE 68503-2427)
Kevin McMullen (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Stephanie Blalock (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Stefan Schöberlein (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Jason Stacy (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Zachary J. Turpin (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296411-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2024 – 12/31/2025

Between the Columns: A toolkit for periodical authorship attribution and display

Refinement, expansion, and documentation of digital methods and tools to assist researchers in identifying authorship in unattributed content printed in newspapers and other periodicals.

This project seeks to create two interconnected innovations with clear utility for researchers and scholars of print culture who work with periodicals, including those without intensive DH training. First, we propose to extend and refine our successful method for the attribution of anonymous periodical writings that has the potential for broad applicability in the study of literary and historical texts. The uncertainty and fluidity of newspaper authorship that lies at the root of this attribution problem will in turn be reflected and clarified in our second innovation: an open-source web interface for the display of periodical materials that makes visible this fluidity and uncertainty of authorship, places attributed texts in the context of their larger periodical publication, and allows for user exploration of the surrounding periodical content.

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
David Smith (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Patrick Yott (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)
Meg Heckman (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)
Giulia Taurino (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296412-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,934 (approved)
$149,934 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2026

Machine Learning for Large-Scale Journalism Collections

The development of a computationally-assisted cataloging workflow for curators and archives to provide enhanced access to large-scale newspaper photograph collections. The Boston Globe’s historic photo morgue, under the stewardship of the Northeastern University Libraries, will serve as the test case for this effort.

Northeastern University will develop machine learning tools and cataloging workflows to provide access to large newspaper photograph collections. Northeastern University is home to the Boston Globe photo morgue, a collection of over 1 million photographic prints from the newspaper’s past editions. When these images are stored, or in the jargon “sent to the morgue”, they often vanish into the history of journalism, consigned to defunct and forgotten newspaper clippings. In the past, digitization costs have been the key factor in limiting access to journalism archives. Today, the main barrier to access is the creation of metadata sufficient to support image search, retrieval, and analysis. The tools and processes developed by this grant will allow the Northeastern University Library to catalog these images at massive scale and provide open-source, reproducible software and workflows that can be leveraged by other institutions to help revive and curate similar collections.

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA 90089-0012)
Deborah Ann Holmes-Wong (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Yao-Yi Chiang (Co Project Director: November 2023 to present)

HAA-296413-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,989 (approved)
$147,756 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2024 – 2/28/2026

Machines Reading Maps Outside the Neat Line

Further development of an existing digital toolkit, mapKurator, to enhance the ability to automatically identify, recover, and transcribe text from maps.

The University of Southern California Digital Library, the University of Minnesota’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Knowledge Computing Lab, and the University of Sheffield’s Digital Humanities Institute respectfully request support under the Tier II category to further develop the mapKurator pipeline to enhance its capabilities for identifying, transcribing, and recognizing semantic contexts for text on historical maps. Our team will train, test, and evaluate the pipeline to distinguish between the text representing geographic features on the map, or text “inside the neat line,” and other text on the map that includes information about the map and how to use it (metadata), details about the regions represented, cultural information, and anything else mapmakers add to contextualize maps.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Jennifer Stertzer (Project Director: June 2023 to present)
Bayard Miller (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)
James P. McClure (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296417-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$127,274 (approved)
$127,274 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2024 – 2/28/2026

North American Climate History Project

The expansion of the North American Climate History project with the addition of new partner organizations and continued development of the data model and prototype site for a federated platform for historical weather and climate records

The North American Climate History project is a collaborative effort between the Papers of Thomas Jefferson at Princeton University, the Center for Digital Editing at the University of Virginia, and the Center for Digital Scholarship at the American Philosophical Society. The primary goal of the project is the development of a federated weather and climate records platform. This platform will support both the editorial preparation (broadly conceived) and publication of weather and climate records. Planning and development work will ultimately result in the publication of the federated North American Climate History digital resource. This digital resource will provide access to weather and climate records and will serve as a platform for projects, archives, and special collections to add materials to the federated resource.

Flickr Foundation (San Francisco, CA 94104-5401)
George Oates (Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296424-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,932 (approved)
$74,932 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 7/31/2024

Development of a Data Lifeboat

Experimental development of digital preservation techniques, using the Flickr Commons photo-sharing platform as a case study, to create replicable models for social media archiving that would save digital networked assets for future humanities research.

The project is to research, design, and build prototype Data Lifeboat software for the Flickr photo-sharing service. Our goals are to create several rough prototypes of the software, develop a reasonably detailed understanding of the main technical challenges, prepare a survey of critical ongoing legal issues, and establish a robust design direction for further product development. This prototyping in public will contribute to the advancement of archival practice by demonstrating what the tools for archiving the essential parts of large, digitally networked cultural resources could be like and how they could work.

St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO 63103-2097)
Atria Larson (Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296429-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$399,907 (approved)
$349,907 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2027

TPEN 3.0: A Linked Open Transcription and Annotation Service for the Next Generation

The enhancement of the Transcription for Paleographical and Editorial Notation (TPEN) platform for transcribing texts from handwritten documents by updating the technical backend, adding new features to allow for greater use with non-Western humanities collections, and conducting outreach activities to scholarly audiences. 

This project consists of a revitalization of the Transcription for Paleographical and Editorial Notation (TPEN; t-pen.org) program, a decade-old free online tool that scholars around the world use to transcribe texts from handwritten documents. The project involves updating the program to meet current web standards; developing code and standards that will contribute to the Open Source community; and designing new features for enhanced project management (including more tailored privacy and team-member role settings), an increasing array of interfaces to accommodate a wider range of textual artifact elements (e.g., right-to-left languages, charts and tables, layered texts, pictorial representations), and more and easier options for exporting transcriptions. The result will be greater functionality and interoperability for scholarship, pedagogy, and digital collection curation in the humanities with a freely accessible tool prepared for its second decade of existence.

Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois (Champaign, IL 61801-3620)
Ana Lucic (Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-296436-24
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2024 – 1/31/2026

Automated Peritext Detection in Fiction and Non-Fiction works

The development of a method to computationally identify the paratextual elements within the digitized book collections in the HathiTrust Research Library.

The aim of this project is to make large-scale text analysis more reliable by building tools to distinguish paratext from main text in books digitized by the HathiTrust Digital Library (HTDL).

Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (Edwardsville, IL 62026-0001)
Jessica DeSpain (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Margaret Smith (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-290317-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,612 (approved)
$149,611 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Recovery Hub for American Women Writers

The continued development and implementation of a digital recovery hub focused on surfacing the work of American women writers and promoting scholarship on their literary contributions.

The project team is seeking a Level II Digital Humanities Advancement Grant to fully implement a digital recovery hub (piloted under a Level I DHAG awarded in 2020) that will operate as a network of scholars grounded in diverse feminist and decolonizing methods under the umbrella of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW). The hub provides a much-needed infrastructure for project consultation and technical assistance for scholars engaged in the recovery of works by American women writers from all periods. The hub’s broader goals are to: 1) reinvigorate digital scholarship as a recovery method by extending traditional editing projects with network mapping, spatial analysis, and the distant reading of massive datasets; 2) provide support for projects at various levels; 3) act as a feminist peer reviewing body for in-process work; and 4) build a community of use to help recovery projects reach broader audiences through SSAWW’s membership and journal Legacy.

Temple University (Philadelphia, PA 19122-6003)
Edward Latham (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Solomon Guhl-Miller (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

HAA-290339-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,680 (approved)
$149,680 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 6/30/2025

Ars Antiqua Online: A Digital Edition of Thirteenth-Century Polyphony

The creation of a resource to transcribe early polyphonic music into standard notation and develop a corpus to allow scholars and students to search, compare, and analyze early music.

During the grant period we would: 1. create a free, open-access website on which to store what will eventually be approximately 110 organa, 460 clausulae, and 680 motets along with their rhythmic and melodic variants; 2. transcribe approximately a quarter of this music into modern notation (25 organa, 100 clausulae, 150 motets) presenting multiple plausible transcriptions of each work each of which will then be entered into the website as .xml files and then analyzed using MEI; 3. create an interface using Edirom and GET requests which will allow users to compare as many versions of a given work as desired, and allow them to create and print a hybrid edition which could combine several of the versions together according to the user''s specifications.

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA 22903-4833)
Christine Ruotolo (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Tonya Howe (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)
John O'Brien (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

HAA-290349-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$303,104 (approved)
$303,104 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2025

Literature in Context: An Open Anthology of Literature, 1400-1925

The continuing development of the open educational resource, Literature in Context, an open-access, curated, and classroom-sourced digital anthology of British and American literature in English in partnership with scholars and students from Marymount University.

We are applying for a Level III Grant to build out Literature in Context, a TEI-encoded digital anthology of literature in the English language from 1400 to 1925, designed for use by students, teachers, and the general public. Our project innovates by taking full advantage of the affordances of digitization to create an Open Educational Resource that incorporates interactivity, digitized page images of original editions, and other contextual materials, making it a true replacement for the costly print anthologies used in American and British literature survey courses across the globe.

Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077)
Dard Neuman (Project Director: June 2022 to present)

HAA-290356-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,998 (approved)
$149,064 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

A Platform for Digitally Transcribing and Archiving Hindustani Music

Further work on a platform that enables users to transcribe, archive, and study non-Western music.

This proposal is to support the continued development of an “interactive digital transcription platform” (IDTP). The IDTP is a web-based application that allows for the digital transcription, archiving, sharing, and analysis of audio recordings of oral melodic and improvisational traditions, with a first focus on Hindustani music.

President and Fellows of Harvard College (Cambridge, MA 02138-3800)
Jinah Kim (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Rashmi Singhal (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Jeff Steward (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-290367-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$349,143 (approved)
$349,143 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Mapping Color in History

The continued development of the Mapping Color in History (MCH) portal that allows scholars to analyze and compare pigment data from historical paintings.

Mapping Color in History [MCH] brings together the scientific data drawn from existing and on-going material analyses of pigments in Asian painting in a historical perspective. As a digital portal with a searchable online database, MCH does not only document pigments and their material properties, but also enable an in-depth historical analysis of pigment data through a search tool that identifies specific examples and their locations in both time and space. By developing a database ontology that can bring together fragmentary and uneven data with complex lateral and hierarchical relationships and by compiling pigment analysis data and deep historical research in a systematic manner, MCH enables truly interdisciplinary research and collaboration, connecting humanists and scientists.

University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA 15260-6133)
Ruth Mostern (Project Director: June 2022 to present)

HAA-290373-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$399,797 (approved)
$349,797 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2025

World Historical Gazetteer: Toward a Digital Epistemology of Place

Expansion, development, and outreach of the World Historical Gazetteer, a comprehensive digital resource linking significant global place names over time used for researching and teaching world history.

This proposal is to develop infrastructure, content and sustainable governance for Version 3 of World Historical Gazetteer (WHG), a platform for linking knowledge about the past via place. WHG is a powerful tool for scholarly collaboration and crucial backend architecture for named entity recognition, digital mapping and library search. This grant will allow WHG to more than double in size and expand its multivalent and multilingual records; to perform enhancements to support teaching and dataset submission; to foster communities of board members, scholars, learners and developers; and to become financially sustainable. We aim to ensure widespread use, institute scholarly peer review and promote open-source development. WHG is the only digital humanities project developing tools, platforms, content, and community for the history of place at the global scale. It enhances and integrates other spatial history projects and fosters a humanistic approach to place beyond historical GIS.

Cornell University (Ithaca, NY 14850-2820)
Matthew Wilkens (Project Director: June 2022 to January 2023)
Matthew Wilkens (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Melanie Walsh (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)
David Mimno (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

HAA-290374-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$349,987 (approved)
$286,903 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2025

BERT for Humanists

The development of case studies about and professional development workshops on the use of BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers) for humanities scholars and students interested in large-scale text analysis.

Large language models (LLMs) have revolutionized natural language processing since their introduction in 2018. By combining huge numbers of parameters with vast text collections, pre-trained LLMs offer advanced general-purpose language understanding off-the-shelf. As powerful as LLMs can be, however, we have seen clear examples of the problems that arise from a lack of good humanities-focused resources to interpret their outputs and to guide scholars in the field. The BERT for Humanists project produces research, training, and tools to inform, empower, and inspire humanities scholars to use LLMs in their disciplines in creative new ways. Together, the products of BERT for Humanists provide an intellectual framework for understanding and evaluating new computational language technologies, so that humanists can use — and critique, as appropriate — both the current generation of LLMs and their rapidly evolving successors.

Grinnell College (Grinnell, IA 50112-2227)
David Neville (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Timothy Arner (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Austin Mason (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

HAA-290378-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$46,136 (approved)
$46,136 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

The Virtual Viking Longship Project: A Study in the Future of Liberal Arts Teaching and Research

The development of a virtual reality model of a Viking Age longship with a team of undergraduate researchers. The project team will document the workflow and learning outcomes to share with other undergraduate institutions.

This project explores and tests strategies for integrating undergraduate student learning and labor in the development of long-term Digital Humanities (DH) research projects. Combining the strengths of two leading liberal arts colleges with the multidisciplinary affordances of virtual reality (VR) technologies, the project aims to create an immersive VR experience for visualizing the social and cultural roles of a Viking Age longship by forming a DH community of inquiry and practice that cultivates deep competencies in spatial computing within the context of a liberal arts education. Student co-authored outcomes will include: (1) an open-source minimum viable product (MVP) VR experience made in consultation with museum partners in the US and Europe; (2) experience design document outlining future development; (3) presentations on our findings at major DH and History conferences; and (4) open-access article detailing the project's strategies and recommended best practices.

University of Central Florida Board of Trustees (Orlando, FL 32816-8005)
Lori C. Walters (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Joseph Kider (Co Project Director: March 2023 to present)

HAA-290380-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$149,476 (approved)
$149,476 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 3/31/2025

Community Heritage Empowerment Toolkit (CHET): A Standards-Based Toolkit for Documenting a Structure’s Life History for Grassroots Heritage Preservation Organizations

The Community Heritage Empowerment Toolkit (CHET) project will create a prototype serves standards-based toolkit, consisting of video, written, and aural guides, instructing grassroots heritage preservation organizations how to document a structure’s Life History. Often the community preservationists who have the desire and time to do this recordation possess limited technical expertise or lack sufficient funding to purchase specialized equipment. There is one ubiquitous and empowering device that has the capability to change this: the smartphone. CHET will provide a comprehensive yet accessible smartphone-enabled digital recordation toolkit enabling the completion of small and medium-scale digital documentation projects. This will empower the entire community to actively participate in preservation and expand information capture locally.

University of Missouri, Kansas City (Kansas City, MO 64110-2235)
David J. Trowbridge (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Diane Louise Mutti Burke (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

HAA-290382-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,855 (approved)
$149,855 (awarded)

Grant period:
3/1/2023 – 6/30/2024

Immersive Digital History Trails: A New Platform for Place-Based Interpretation with Working Prototypes for the History of Jazz, Baseball, and BBQ in Kansas City

Development of a location-based notification system that will be tested through the creation of three new heritage tours in Kansas City, and then deployed for the 1400+ local history trails within the Clio website. 

Working with a diverse team of scholars, software developers, and organizations, our team will develop and test a new interpretive platform in Clio that will connect the public to humanities scholarship as they explore thematic three Kansas City history trails centered on jazz, baseball, and barbecue. The centerpiece of this prototyping project is the creation of a two-way geofencing system that will offer location-based media on the user's mobile device as they move along the trail while also sending a Bluetooth signal that triggers events within the user’s physical surroundings. Our team will add more accessibility features and user options during the grant period that will enhance the 1400 existing trails and walking tours in Clio.

University of the Virgin Islands (Charlotte Amalie, VI 00802-6004)
Thalassa Tonks (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Molly Perry (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

HAA-290389-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Community Conversations: A Digitized Cultural Preservation Project in the United States Virgin Islands

The planning and development of a digital archive of oral histories of community members, built by faculty and students at the University of the Virgin Islands.

This project will engage University of the Virgin Islands students in Service Learning by training them in best practices of oral history research, collection, preservation, public engagement and linguistic practices, awareness, and recording. Oral history collection develops students’ critical communication capacities and analytical skills, while also helping to preserve the rich history, languages, and cultures of the Virgin Islands community. This funding will enable a team of UVI faculty members to continue to train and engage a young generation to contribute meaningfully to humanities projects on St. Croix, St. John, St. Thomas, and Water Island. This grant will allow students to further contribute to the preservation of these stories by transcribing and editing the videos to be uploaded into an online public access website, so that other researchers around the world gain appreciation for the history and cultures of the US Virgin Islands.

Fordham University (Bronx, NY 10458-9993)
Matthew Hockenberry (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Colette Perold (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

HAA-290391-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Grant products]

Totals:
$49,926 (approved)
$49,926 (awarded)

Grant period:
2/1/2023 – 5/31/2024

Manifest: Digital Humanities Platform for the Critical Study of Logistics

Research and testing of the Manifest platform designed to support humanities research of supply chains and commodities. 

While of significant social and environmental importance, global supply chains are both complex and opaque. Understanding the impact of these networks is challenging. Manifest is a digital humanities project designed to allow researchers in the humanities to produce critical accounts of global logistical operation and to communicate the impact of supply chains on society. This proposal will form a research network around Manifest's open-source, web-based platform for the critical analysis of supply chains, production lines, and trade networks. Based on case studies implemented on the Manifest platform by members of the research network, the project will construct a comprehensive research guide and curriculum for the critical study of logistics in the humanities.

CUNY Research Foundation, Graduate School and University Center (New York, NY 10016-4309)
Lisa M. Rhody (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Stephen Zweibel (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

HAA-290392-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$349,887 (approved)
$349,887 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

DHRIFT: Digital Humanities Resource Infrastructure for Teaching Technology

The continued development of the Digital Humanities Resource Infrastructure for Teaching Technology (DHRIFT) platform to provide technical training in digital humanities methodologies with a particular focus on faculty and staff for historically under-resourced institutions. 

Access to technical training in the digital humanities is inequitably distributed, especially among historically underserved institutions. Since 2018, and with funding provided by two NEH-funded IATDH grants, the Graduate Center, CUNY has supported development of over 30 local DH institutes and intensives by training 48 DH practitioners as part of the Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI). Building on the demonstrated success of these approaches, GCDI proposes a social and infrastructural intervention, Digital Humanities Resource Infrastructure for Teaching Technology (DHRIFT), to provide pedagogical support to a wider DH community. DHRIFT is conceived around flexible infrastructure for deployable sites—DHRIFT Core—that can be readily set up at local institutions and which provide ready-to-teach OERs and additional functionality to support DH pedagogy. By building community, curriculum, and infrastructure, DHRIFT aims to facilitate the more equitable development of DH skills.

California State University, Channel Islands (Camarillo, CA 93012-8599)
Eric Kaltman (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Joseph Osborn (Co Project Director: December 2022 to present)

HAA-290396-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$146,605 (approved)
$146,605 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

The Game and Interactive Software Scholarship Toolkit: Expanding Software Citation and Reference

The creation of an open-source platform and tools to facilitate retrieving, using, and studying historical software.

The Game and Interactive Software Scholarship Toolkit (GISST) is a platform for managing the citation and reference of software objects, their run-time states, and performances of their functionality by users. GISST is designed to lower the technical burden for scholars interested in interpreting historical software by making emulated systems more accessible, searchable, and shareable.

Mangalam Centers (Berkeley, CA 94704-1418)
Ligeia Lugli (Project Director: June 2022 to present)
Regiani Aparecida Santos-Zacarias (Co Project Director: June 2022 to present)

HAA-290402-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$50,000 (approved)
$50,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2023 – 3/31/2024

Democratizing digital lexicography: an infrastructure to facilitate the creation and dissemination of electronic dictionaries.

A series of virtual planning meetings for the development of a prototype platform for builders of digital lexical resources and dictionaries for under resourced languages.

The project supports the creation and dissemination of digital dictionaries for low-resource languages. With many world languages at risk of extinction, online dictionaries & glossaries are increasingly crucial. Unfortunately, the languages most in need of such resources have the biggest challenges. The availability of digital infrastructure for a language is proportional to its representation - the more data that is available in digital format, the easier it becomes to automatically process it. Conversely, the less a language/culture is represented online, the higher the costs of retrieving and processing data about it. We propose to prototype a digital infrastructure that can help redress this inequality by drastically reducing the costs/technical expertise required to create, publish and maintain online dictionaries. A series of iterative development cycles will bring together user-testers, identify their needs, and prepare an alpha-prototype application to address these needs.

PHAROS: The International Photo Archives Association (Brooklyn, NY 11215-2901)
Louisa Wood Ruby (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293142-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$399,650 (approved)
$349,650 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2026

PHAROS: Explore, Connect and Contextualize Art Histories

The creation of a digital research platform and tools for accessing and studying photographic archives spanning a total of fourteen collections.

PHAROS: The International Association of Photo Archives, a collaboration between fourteen North American and European art historical photo archives, aims to create an open and freely accessible digital research platform allowing for comprehensive and consolidated access to photo archive images and associated scholarly documentation. Following a three-year Mellon grant to build a pilot, support from the NEH will enable the platform to move into production and make the project sustainable. The planned work will result in a robust, scalable, and seamless research platform for art historians, digital humanists, data scientists, and the general public. The semantically enriched and structured data can contribute to a vibrant culture of open scholarship and collaboration among researchers from multiple disciplines, disrupting barriers that have been posed by the difficulties of navigating proprietary art historical databases in which information is siloed.

Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA 24061-2000)
Rachel Midura (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293210-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,281 (approved)
$74,281 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2024

Early Modern Digital Itineraries: Workshops for a Data-Driven Approach to Premodern Travel

A series of workshops for digital humanities scholars of early modern Europe to establish a professional network of researchers on premodern digital, spatial history and explore how geographical information found in primary sources such as letters and journal can be extracted and mapped to trace the movement of people and goods. 

We propose a Level 1 grant to support three workshops and a conference October 2023-September 2024. An expert advisory board and diverse cohort of participants will build upon a shared foundation: the EmDigIt database of itineraries. Listed routes structured navigation of space from antiquity through the eighteenth century, yet have rarely been studied, nor visualized for a wider public. The database transforms 86 itineraries printed between 1545-1761 in English, Italian, French, German, Spanish and Polish languages into structured data for the first time. Participants will collaborate on research questions using the EmDigIt data over the course of the year. A final meeting in summer 2024 will take place in conjunction with the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations DH Conference in Washington D.C. A public white paper will provide a state-of-the-field of digital, spatial history and blueprint for an EmDigIt web platform.

Regents of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382)
Veronica Stanich (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Daragh Byrne (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293389-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$74,901 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 12/31/2024

Reco(r)ding CripTech: Rendering Artifacts of Process Legible and Accessible in an Online Archive

The planning and prototyping of accessibility features for the Ground Works scholarly journal to develop a series of recommendations for how publishing digital art historical journals can sensitively work with the artistic production of disabled artists.

Ground Works, a platform for interdisciplinary research, is creating an online archive called Reco(r)ding CripTech that documents the collaborative processes of six disabled artists focused on disability innovation and aesthetic access. The archive will include the artifacts of the artists’ processes. We will explore best practices for the preparation, accessibility, representation, deposit, and citation of these items in an online archive, through the following key activities 1) creating a prototype archive. 2) a workshop with humanities scholars to test the usability, accessibility, and legibility of the archive. 3) creation of a set of best practice guidelines for such an archive. The outcomes will be a prototype archive of practice products, available to humanities scholars and digital scholarly publishers for use and feedback, and a draft outline of best practices for the online archiving of these rich-media non-scholarly artifacts.

Klezmer Institute, Inc. (Yonkers, NY 10702-1175)
Christina Crowder (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293399-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$150,000 (approved)
$150,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2025

The Klezmer Archive Project

The continued development of a digital archive and tools for researching klezmer music. 

The Klezmer Archive (KA) project is creating a universally accessible, useful digital archival tool for interaction, discovery, and research on available information about klezmer music and its network of contemporary and historical people.

Haverford College (Haverford, PA 19041-1392)
Bret Edmund Mulligan (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Patricia Guardiola (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Anna Lacy (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293408-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$148,015 (approved)
$148,015 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2025

Bridge Readability Tools for Historical Language Text Analysis and Data-Informed Pedagogy

The further development of The Bridge Readability Tools platform for analyzing and teaching ancient Greek and Latin texts.

The Bridge Readability Tools Project will develop three pedagogical and scholarly tools for The Bridge, an existing digital ecosystem that supports the encoding and reading of Ancient Greek and Latin at the secondary, collegiate, and professional levels. These independent tools, which will form a mutually-supporting suite of Bridge Readability Tools, will (1) produce practical analyses of textual difficulty (i.e., readability) for the hundreds of texts in the Bridge Corpus via Bridge/Stats; (2) facilitate data-informed language syllabus and curriculum construction via Bridge/Oracle, which will help instructors, students, and independent learners discover readable texts and plan data-supported curricula, fostering more efficient acquisition of historical languages; (2) democratize and accelerate the accurate encoding of Latin texts from classical antiquity to the modern period via the Bridge/Lemmatizer2 tool.

FAIC (Washington, DC 20005-1704)
Tiffani Emig (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293423-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$349,293 (approved)
$315,199 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2025

STiCH: Collections Tools for Climate Action

The further development of the Sustainability Tools in Cultural Heritage (STiCH) Carbon Calculator, a computational analysis and modeling platform to assist heritage professionals in determining the carbon footprint of the materials used for the preservation and exhibition of cultural resources. 

The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) will refine the Sustainability Tools in Cultural Heritage (STiCH) Carbon Calculator; a free, open-access, digital tool designed to empower professionals with information to make climate-conscious materials choices for treatment, display, and transportation of cultural heritage. NEH Tier I and II Research and Development Grants (2017-2022) supported building the STiCH calculator software, data sheets, and website. STiCH uses Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a science-based environmental modeling tool, to calculate the carbon footprint of materials. A key finding of Held in Trust (HIT), a partnership between NEH and FAIC to evaluate the state of preservation in the US, identified the importance of addressing the effects of climate change in the heritage sector. In this Level III NEH Grant, user-led evaluations guide redesigning the STiCH Carbon Calculator and producing tutorials aimed at changing behaviors towards climate action.

University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0001)
Bettina Fabos (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
John DeGroote (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-293439-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$149,619 (approved)
$149,619 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 4/30/2025

Mainstreet 360°: An Application for Georeferencing and Layering Historical Photos in a Digital Archive

The design and development of a prototype open-source tool for 360° mapping of historical photographs. 

Our team proposes research and development on an augmented reality mapping application for the Fortepan.us digital photo archival platform. The application will display superimposed geolocated historical photos onto a modern-day 360° streetscape (like an open source “Google Historical Street View”). Our intent is to match historical photos of American campuses and main streets to the very place and perspective from which the photographer captured the original photograph, and display the photos, decade by decade (e.g., 1900, 1910, 1920), in a customized historical “Mainstreet 360°” street view. We also aim to provide a means for interpreting the augmented reality historical scenes through text fields for each decade and small pop up info boxes atop photographs. We will present 2 workshops (1 virtual), create a “how-to” video series, and promote the app at conferences. Our final aim: demystify 360° imaging and empower cultural heritage institutions to use this easy, powerful visual tool.

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Steven Arlyn Wernke (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Yuankai Huo (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)
N. Parker VanValkenburgh (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-293452-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$348,190 (approved)
$348,190 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2026

GeoPACHA 2.0: Large-Scale Archaeological Imagery Survey Through Human-Machine Teaming

The further development and expansion of an existing platform to enable large-scale Artificial Intelligence-assisted surveys of archaeological sites. 

Archaeology contributes unique insights into the human story across many scales, but the field’s traditional methods are not well-suited for working beyond the scale of small regions. We employ digital methods to document archaeological landscapes across regions, in our NEH ODH-sponsored webapp GeoPACHA: Geospatial Platform for Andean Culture, History, and Archaeology. In this three year project, we will revise the GeoPACHA codebase to enable AI-assisted archaeological imagery survey, and refine our deep learning models for archaeological feature detection, which leverage the large set of human-tagged features previously registered on GeoPACHA. We will then conduct an autonomous survey of satellite imagery across the central Andes. Our network of regional experts and their diverse student surveyors will then edit and enrich these AI-generated datasets via GeoPACHA 2.0, in a human-machine teaming effort that will result in the largest imagery survey in the western hemisphere.

University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Yucong Jiang (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293454-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$74,973 (approved)
$74,973 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 9/30/2025

Prototyping a Digital Tool for Computer-Assisted Annotation and Analysis of Music Performance

The development of tools to automatically align musical performances and scores that will allow users to analyze performances and scores simultaneously and at scale. 

Vast troves of both sound recordings and musical scores have become widely available in the digital era, but drawing connections between these two mediums to develop insights about performance style and artistic expression has remained difficult and time-consuming. This project develops a prototype of an open-source software tool to facilitate studying recorded music performances. Our tool will assist music scholars, archivists, and enthusiasts in complex musical analysis by both streamlining their workflows and expanding their capabilities, enhanced by advanced AI technologies and an easy-to-use graphical interface, without requiring programming experience. To optimize usability, our software design will be informed by real-world experts and prospective users. This tool will enable users to examine performances and scores in a single integrated process, scale up existing research, and open up transformative new approaches to musicology and music theory research.

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA 52242-1320)
Paul Chandler Dilley (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
William Brent Seales (Co Project Director: June 2023 to present)

HAA-293472-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$75,000 (approved)
$75,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2023 – 1/31/2025

Communicating Revealed Texts: Best Practices for Born-Digital Editions Using Enhanced Imaging

The creation of a working group of scholars using non-invasive imaging methods to analyze ancient manuscripts.

Over the past two decades, much progress has been made in non-invasive imaging techniques to reveal unreadable text, especially in multispectral (MSI) imaging to bring out erased or faded writing, and in micro-CT, to reveal writing in unopened manuscripts. This grant will establish a working group of 13 scholars, curators, and metadata specialists who are currently using enhanced images of ancient manuscripts, from the Dead Sea Scrolls to the Herculaneum Papyri, the Living Gospel of Mani, and Old Nubian literature. Through a series of monthly Zoom meetings and a summer workshop at the University of Iowa Center for the Book, we will establish best practices for born-digital editions of texts using enhanced images, to show how transcribed text fits into the structure of an imaged manuscript, even if not visible to the naked eye, and to link editorial transcription choices to particular images, enabling others to make an informed, critical reading of these otherwise inaccessible writings.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Daniel Aaron Law (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Mallory E. Matsumoto (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Iyaxel Cojti Ren (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293490-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$148,737 (approved)
$148,737 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 8/31/2025

MAYALEX: A comparative lexical database of early Mayan languages

The expansion of an existing digital infrastructure for Indo-European languages to include creation of a set of linked online etymological dictionaries for early Mayan languages. 

We request Level II DHAG funding, to expand our existing digital infrastructure for Indo-European languages, IELEX, and create MAYALEX: interlinked, extensible online etymological dictionaries for early Mayan languages. Words and their origins express the ideas, expressions, histories, and intertwining of cultures through time. Few digital resources meet the lexical needs of scholars of early Mesoamerica; still fewer invite non-specialists to explore. We will create a functional, publicly available prototype of user-friendly dictionaries that link words through their shared etymologies, starting with the Colonial Mayan language Ch’olti’. Users will be able to study words in a language of interest, explore the web of connections linking that language to others, browse words across or within languages according to form or meaning, and export their discoveries in several possible formats for further study.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Inc. (Boston, MA 02116-2813)
Ian Spangler (Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293491-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$348,641 (approved)
$348,641 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 8/31/2026

Making Open-Source Georeferencing Technology Collections-Ready with the Allmaps Platform

The continued development of the Allmaps georeferencing platform to allow institutions with cartographic collections to better share their resources and for scholars, students, and the general public to more successfully engage with these collections.

In partnership with the American Geographical Society Library, the Leventhal Map & Education Center will build an open-source platform for georeferencing digitized cartographic collections, based on the Allmaps software library already under development. By building a patron-facing digital interface for georeferencing—a term which refers to the use of software to align scanned maps with real-world geographies—hundreds of cultural institutions around the world can make their digitized map collections newly vibrant for scholars, educators, and the public.

New York University (New York, NY 10012-1019)
Sibylle Fischer (Project Director: January 2023 to present)
Ellen Noonan (Co Project Director: January 2023 to present)

HAA-293510-23
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$139,706 (approved)
$139,706 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2023 – 11/30/2024

Migrants and the State: Unlocking the Potential of A-files for the Histories of U.S. Immigration

The development of open-source machine learning methods for quickly processing historical migrant records. 

Migrants and the State will facilitate and expand access to a set of historical migrant records held by the U.S. National Archives (NARA) gathered in what are known as A-files. A-files contain a wide variety of documentation specific to the experiences of individual migrants and the implementation of U.S. immigration law. While in the public domain, these A-files are currently accessible only on a file-by-file basis. This project will use 550 A-files to develop machine learning models for segmenting the contents of A-files, identifying document types (e.g. government forms, correspondence, employment records, etc.), and adding detailed metadata about them, making it possible to examine them at scale and discern currently untraceable stories and patterns across a large number of A-files. The project will also create a minimal web interface to enable focus group testing with immigration historians to gather feedback and plan for the project's next phase.

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI 48824-3407)
Elizabeth Sneller (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284835-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,908 (approved)
$99,908 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Building and Disseminating an App for Ethnographic Remote Audio Recording

The development and testing with humanities scholars of an open source mobile recording app for collecting “audio diaries” for use in research and public engagement. 

This project builds on the success of an existing prototype for a remote recording mobile app used to collect "audio diaries" in 2020-2021. We aim to redevelop the code for the front end of the app and refactor the code for the back end, resulting in a shareable app infrastructure that may be adopted by researchers at any number of institutions. We will bring together a user community of beta testing researchers across the humanities who may benefit from a remote recording app, which we hope to expand during the second year of funding into a broad user community and support system. The code and user manual will be published on a public GitLab repository, enabling future improvements by the user community.

Northeastern University (Boston, MA 02115-5005)
Ellen Cushman (Project Director: June 2021 to September 2023)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: September 2023 to January 2024)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Project Director: January 2024 to present)
Julia Hammond Flanders (Co Project Director: December 2021 to September 2023)
Benjamin Elliott Frey (Co Project Director: September 2023 to December 2023)

HAA-284836-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$99,957 (approved)
$99,957 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 6/30/2024

Translating Cherokee Manuscripts: Creating a Writing Environment for DAILP

The further development of user interfaces for collective translation of the collections in the Digital Archive for American Indian Languages Preservation and Perseverance (DAILP), a digital archive of Cherokee-language manuscripts and lexical resources.

Cherokee language documents are a ready source of valuable insight into the cultural, linguistic, and historical legacy of the Cherokee people. With an online environment to facilitate translation, Cherokee language experts and scholars could translate these documents collectively with Cherokee language learners of all ages who are found in online classes, immersion schools, university classrooms, and communities. And their translation work could be supported with ready access to the lexical datasets found in dictionaries, wordlists, and grammars. The Digital Archive for American Indian Languages Preservation and Perseverance (DAILP) seeks to address these needs by creating a digital archive of Cherokee-language manuscripts and lexical resources to support the collective translation of American Indian language manuscripts, and to advance indigenous language learning, translation, and documentation.

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN 37240-0001)
Markus Eberl (Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284842-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[Media coverage]

Totals:
$49,289 (approved)
$41,515 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Changing Communities of Ancient Builders: Machine Learning-based Analysis of Mortars from Caesarea Maritima (Israel)

The creation of machine learning methods to identify microartifacts from archaeological sites. 

Mortars are ubiquitous and essential parts of construction. Ancient builders prepared them as members of changing communities of practice. We ask to what degree interactions among contemporaries led to standardized mortars and whether builders learnt from culturally different predecessors. These issues require studying a large data set objectively. Our Level 1 project proposes to analyze 1000 mortar samples and ~1 billion particles with a dynamic image particle analyzer. We train machine learning algorithms to identify experimentally reproduced mortar constituents in archaeological samples. The latter come from the ancient port city of Caesarea Maritima that Roman, Jewish, Byzantine, Abassid-Fatimid Muslim, and Crusader builders constructed between 22 B.C.E. and 1265 C.E. Our approach – dynamic image analysis, experimental archaeology, and machine learning – can be extended to other parts of the ancient Mediterranean as well as to other microartifacts.

Lindenwood Education System (Saint Charles, MO 63301-1693)
Geremy Carnes (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Margaret Smith (Co Project Director: December 2021 to present)

HAA-284844-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

[White paper]

Totals:
$49,938 (approved)
$49,938 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 6/30/2023

Expanding Access to the Digital Humanities in St. Louis

Developing a workshop and building a network for supporting and disseminating methods in digital humanities pedagogy for secondary and post-secondary institutions in the St. Louis, Missouri region.

“Expanding Access to the Digital Humanities in St. Louis” will build a digital humanities network for the greater St. Louis metropolitan area, linking faculty, students, and community members across the region’s educational and cultural institutions in a community of pedagogy and practice. This network will bridge the K-12-college divide and emphasize active advancement of digital humanities pedagogy and access for underserved populations. Rather than focusing on faculty research, this network will center student learning, particularly at the often neglected secondary and undergraduate levels. At a workshop held in September 2022, network members will establish processes that will allow secondary and post-secondary students throughout the region to participate remotely in digital humanities projects headquartered at participating institutions. They will also identify other collaborative goals for the network to pursue toward improving digital humanities pedagogy in St. Louis.

St. Louis University (St. Louis, MO 63103-2097)
Daniel Nickolai (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Kathleen Llewellyn (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Sarah Bauer (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Christina Garcia (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)
Amy E. Wright (Co Project Director: January 2022 to present)

HAA-284849-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals (outright + matching):
$275,000 (approved)
$225,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

iSpraak: A web-based application for second language pronunciation instruction, assessment, and research

Scaling up development and dissemination of the iSpraak application as a free and open source language pronunciation instruction and learning tool. 

This NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant proposal outlines the plan to enhance, scale, and provide free access to the web application iSpraak. This digital platform equips educators and scholars with an innovative tool for second language pronunciation instruction, assessment, and research. Originally developed for internal use at Saint Louis University in 2014, iSpraak has now been used by tens of thousands of students and instructors across the globe. NEH funding is currently sought in order to continue development, remove cost barriers to access, and to make the platform fully open and accessible to all interested parties.

Trustees of Indiana University (Bloomington, IN 47405-7000)
John Anthony Walsh (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
J. Stephen Downie (Co Project Director: June 2021 to present)

HAA-284850-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$325,000 (approved)
$325,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

Tools for Open Research and Computation with HathiTrust: Leveraging Intelligent Text Extraction (TORCHLITE)

The development of web-based tools and documentation to allow both novice and expert users to interact with data from the HathiTrust Digital Library.

The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) seeks $325,000 in funding for a period of 2 years, through the Digital Humanities Advancement Grants program, Level III, for the development of next-generation web-based, interactive visualization and analytical tool dashboard that consume existing data from our one-of-a-kind, fully open Extracted Features dataset, along with a well-documented API to allow our user community to develop its own tools for interacting with data from the 17.5-million-volume HathiTrust Digital Library. We will develop and promote these tools and API through a robust community outreach program that includes a public event and hack-a-thon focused on tool building.

University of Richmond (Richmond, VA 23173-0001)
Lauren Tilton (Project Director: June 2021 to present)
Taylor Arnold (Co Project Director: October 2021 to present)

HAA-284853-22
Digital Humanities Advancement Grants
Digital Humanities

Totals:
$324,693 (approved)
$324,693 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 12/31/2024

PGVis: Digital Public Humanities Software for Visualizing Image Collections

The creation of software to easily allow non-programmers to develop interactive public humanities digital projects.

The Photogrammar Visualization Software (PGVis) is an open-source tool for the visualization and exploration of image collections. PGVis will allow anyone with a collection of digital images and associated metadata to create, with no prior programming experience, their own digital public humanities projects in the form of public websites. In addition to the software, the project will produce six case studies that will model and highlight how the software can be used in a variety of different domains, data sizes, and types of institutions.