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Funded Projects Query Form
8 matches

State: Texas
Keywords: 'Indigenous Languages of Latin America ' (this phrase)
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University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Patience L. Epps (Project Director: May 2021 to December 2022)
Susan Smythe Kung (Co Project Director: October 2021 to December 2022)

ZPA-283989-22
ARP-Organizations (Preservation-related)
Agency-wide Projects

Totals:
$60,306 (approved)
$33,214 (awarded)

Grant period:
1/1/2022 – 8/31/2022

Sustainable curation, preservation and online access for multilingual cultural heritage collections at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America

The retention of one staff position and one student technician to sustain the operations of the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America. 

The University of Texas at Austin's Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) seeks American Rescue Plan: Humanities Organizations funding to sustain operations and support for the successful completion of its existing NEH grant PD-260978-18 "Archiving Significant Collections of Endangered Languages: Two Multilingual Regions of Northwestern South America." This project will digitize, curate, and archive eight significant collections of multilingual, multimedia materials that document Indigenous languages and cultures from Highland Ecuador and the Upper Rio Negro region of northwest Brazil and eastern Colombia. As the university, the country, and the entire world begin the difficult post-pandemic economic recovery, ARP support will ensure AILLA's continued growth, development, long-term preservation, accessibility, and discoverability by safeguarding critical staff positions, which are at risk of being lost.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Patience L. Epps (Project Director: November 2018 to present)

PD-266994-19
Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Preservation and Access

[Grant products][Prizes]

Totals:
$323,717 (approved)
$323,717 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2019 – 8/31/2024

Documentation of Nadeb (mbj), a Naduhup language of Brazil

The documentation and description of Nadeb, an endangered language spoken in northwest Brazil.  The project would produce an annotated collection of digital recordings in audio and video, a grammatical description, lexicon, and collection of texts, in collaboration with the Nadeb community, as well as a comprehensive reference grammar, a dictionary (Nadeb-English-Portuguese), and a set of pedagogical materials for community use.

This project will undertake the documentation and description of Nadeb, a member of the small Naduhup family (formerly known as Maku), spoken in northwest Brazil.  The principal goals are to produce an annotated collection of digital recordings in audio and video, a grammatical description, lexicon, and collection of texts, in collaboration with the Nadeb community. Documentation will focus on natural discourse and will span a range of genres, with particular emphases on traditional verbal art forms involving song, narrative, and incantation; conversation; and knowledge concerning Nadeb traditional territory. Secondary outcomes will consist of a comprehensive reference grammar, a dictionary (Nadeb-English-Portuguese), and a set of pedagogical materials for community use. Materials will be archived in the Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America at the University of Texas at Austin.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Patience L. Epps (Project Director: September 2017 to December 2022)
Susan Smythe Kung (Co Project Director: May 2019 to December 2022)

PD-260978-18
Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$227,365 (approved)
$223,801 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2018 – 12/31/2021

Archiving Significant Collections of Endangered Languages: Two Multilingual Regions of Northwest South America

The processing and digitization of eight collections of archived documentation for endangered languages in Brazil, Colombia, and Ecuador, which express and preserve knowledge of culture, history, and ecology in this part of South America. Materials would be accessioned by the Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America and made available to researchers and the public.

This project will gather together, curate and digitize a set of eight significant collections of South American indigenous languages, the results of decades of research by senior scholars; the collections will be archived at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America. These materials constitute an important resource for further linguistic, ethnographic, and ethnomusical research, and are of high value to community members and scholars. They include six legacy collections from the Upper Rio Negro region of the northwest Amazon (Brazil and Colombia), and two collections focused on Ecuadorian Kichwa, most notably the Ca'ar variety. All of the languages concerned are endangered or vulnerable to varying degrees, and the collections are heavily focused on threatened forms of discourse, such as ritual speech and song. Of the Upper Rio Negro set, the collections of Elsa Gomez-Imbert, Stephen Hugh- Jones, and Arthur P. Sorensen, Jr. include the East Tukanoan languages Bar' (bao), Barasana (bsn), Eduria (bsn, widely agreed to be distinct from Barasana), Karapana (cbc), Tatuyo (tav), Makuna (myy), and Tukano (tuo). The collections of Howard Reid and Renato Athias are focused on Hup (jup, Naduhupan), while Reid's collection also contains a few materials from two languages of the wider region, Nukak (mbr, Kakua-Nukakan) and Hot' (yua, isolate). Robin Wright's collection involves Baniwa (bwi, Arawakan). Of the Ecuadorian Kichwa set, Judy Blankenship's and Allison Adrian's collections are both focused on Ca'ar Highland Kichwa (qxr, Quechuan), while Adrian's also includes some material from Loja Highland Kichwa (qvj, Quechua).

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Virginia Garrard Burnett (Project Director: July 2017 to July 2023)

PW-259116-18
Humanities Collections and Reference Resources
Preservation and Access

[White paper][Grant products]

Totals:
$42,000 (approved)
$40,236 (awarded)

Grant period:
10/1/2018 – 9/30/2020

Transcribing AILLA: Increasing Collection Access and Reusability through Crowdsourced Transcription

A Foundations pilot project to transcribe materials in Mixtec, a pre-Columbian language spoken in south-central Mexico, and that are housed at the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America.  Working with undergraduate linguistics students and Mixtec community members who have migrated to southern California, the applicant would undertake transcription of hand-written documents and audio recordings to make them searchable, thereby improving access and reuse. 

The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) has thousands of images of handwritten manuscripts whose text cannot be searched, making them difficult for users to discover and access. Since many of these documents are transcriptions or translations of recordings in AILLA's collections, improving access to a manuscript increases access to other media. This project pilots a low-cost process to improve access to resources in AILLA's collections by crowdsourcing the transcription of select handwritten documents written in Mixtec languages using open-source software. It will be implemented in an undergraduate linguistics course at UT, for which lesson plans will be developed, and within a Mixtec speech community in California, in an effort to develop a community of practice. More broadly, investigators will disseminate findings among other digital archives so they may adapt the approach to any language.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Joel F. Sherzer (Project Director: December 2008 to May 2012)

PD-50011-09
Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$276,985 (approved)
$276,985 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2009 – 2/28/2012

Archiving Significant Collections of Latin American Endangered Language Resources II

Digital archiving of endangered Mexican and South American linguistic materials to be made accessible by the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America.

The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) is a digital repository of multimedia materials. A central part of AILLA's mission is to locate valuable language resources, digitize and catalog them in accordance with international standards, house them in a secure repository, and make them accessible to indigenous people, researchers, and interested laypersons worldwide. The two-year Archiving Significant Collections II (ASC-II) project will perform this service for the following six collections: 1) Achuar and Shuar [Ecuador and Peru]; 2) Quichua and Quechua [Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru]; 3) Tzotzil and other Mayan languages [Mexico]; 4) Pastaza Quechua [Ecuador]; 5) Huasteca Nahua [Mexico]; and 6) Tucano [Brazil].

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Joel F. Sherzer (Project Director: January 2006 to December 2010)
Heidi Johnson (Co Project Director: January 2006 to December 2010)

PD-50003-06
Documenting Endangered Languages - Preservation
Preservation and Access

[Grant products]

Totals:
$348,000 (approved)
$348,000 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2006 – 8/31/2010

Archiving Significant Collections of Endangered Language Resources

Digital archiving of Mexican, Central, and South American linguistic materials to be made accessible by The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA).

The Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA) is a Web-based repository of multimedia materials that are digitize in accordance with international standards and are made accessible to scholars and speaker communities worldwide. In collaboration with the eight linguists who have collected materials over the last 40 years, the project staff would digitize and preserve recordings and written materials that document languages of Costa Rica, Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, and Mexico.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Joel F. Sherzer (Project Director: July 2002 to February 2006)

PA-50182-03
Preservation/Access Projects
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$310,557 (approved)
$310,557 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2003 – 8/31/2005

Creating a Web-based Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA)

The creation of an online database of audio and textual materials related to the indigenous languages of Latin America, many of which are endangered or already extinct.

University of Texas, Austin (Austin, TX 78712-0100)
Joel F. Sherzer (Project Director: July 2000 to February 2004)

PA-23817-01
Preservation/Access Projects
Preservation and Access

Totals:
$250,000 (approved)
$249,998 (awarded)

Grant period:
9/1/2001 – 8/31/2003

Creating a Web-based Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (AILLA)

The creation of an online database of audio and textual materials related to the indigenous languages of Latin America, many of which are endangered or already extinct.