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Products for grant RA-259407-18

RA-259407-18
Long-term Research Fellowships at The American School of Classical Studies at Athens
Jenifer Neils, Trustees of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Grant details: https://apps.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-259407-18

Bronze Age Europe: Revolutions in Agricultural Adaptation (Book Section)
Title: Bronze Age Europe: Revolutions in Agricultural Adaptation
Author: Lynne A Kvapil
Editor: David B. Hollander
Editor: Tim Howe
Abstract: A Companion to Ancient Agriculture is an authoritative overview of the history and development of agriculture in the ancient world. Focusing primarily on the Near East and Mediterranean regions, this unique text explores the cultivation of the soil and rearing of animals through centuries of human civilization—from the Neolithic beginnings of agriculture to Late Antiquity. Chapters written by the leading scholars in their fields present a multidisciplinary examination of the agricultural methods and influences that have enabled humans to survive and prosper.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.wiley.com/en-us/A+Companion+to+Ancient+Agriculture-p-9781118970928
Primary URL Description: Publisher website
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Book Title: A Companion to Ancient Agriculture
ISBN: 978-1-118-9709

The Birth of the Domestic Goddess: Gendered Farm Labor in Late Bronze Age Greece (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Birth of the Domestic Goddess: Gendered Farm Labor in Late Bronze Age Greece
Author: Lynne A Kvapil
Abstract: The Birth of the Domestic Goddess: Gendered Farm Labor in Late Bronze Age Greece
Date: 02/05/2021
Primary URL: https://www.indianaclassics.org/meetings.html
Primary URL Description: Conference website
Conference Name: Indiana Classical Conference, Indianapolis, IN

Fraction = Union (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Fraction = Union
Abstract: This project investigates how artists used vivid visual allegories of Christ's broken body in the Eucharist as a means to conceptualize and represent ecumenical union: the aspiration to unite Christian peoples worldwide into one, undivided, universal Church. The protagonist of the project is a well-known Byzantine micromosaic icon of Christ the Man of Sorrows, enshrined since ca. 1400 at the Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome. Crafted from nearly 50,000 minute pieces of glass, metal, marble, and stone, the icon is among the most meticulous depictions of the human body in medieval art. The story of this icon, which journeyed from Constantinople to Rome via the Kingdom of Naples and other Mediterranean ports-of-call, affords new insight into the metaphorical meaning of Christ's broken body in both Orthodox and Latin/Catholic ritual contexts at a critical juncture in the political conflict between the divided Churches of East and West. Enshrined in Rome in an extraordinary triptych reliquary cabinet and ensconced by relics representing all corners of medieval Christendom, the icon became the centerpiece to a grand microcosm of the Christian oecumene: “the known world.” Ultimately, the project showcases the roles of art and allegory in creating a new, global vision for the Church at the close of the Middle Ages––a mosaic made up of diverse parts, united in a cohesive, ecclesiological body.
Author: John Lansdowne
Date: 11/01/2020
Location: Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies
Primary URL: http://itatti.harvard.edu/people/john-lansdowne
Primary URL Description: Speaker's profile about work, as posted on institute's website.

Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (Book)
Title: Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities
Author: Julia Shear
Abstract: In ancient Athens, the Panathenaia was the most important festival and was celebrated in honour of Athena from the middle of the sixth century BC until the end of the fourth century AD. This in-depth study examines how this all-Athenian celebration was an occasion for constructing identities and how it affected those identities. Since not everyone took part in the same way, this differential participation articulated individuals' relationships both to the goddess and to the city so that the festival played an important role in negotiating what it meant to be Athenian (and non-Athenian). Julia Shear applies theories of identity formation which were developed in the social sciences to the ancient Greek material and brings together historical, epigraphical, and archaeological evidence to provide a better understanding both of this important occasion and of Athenian identities over the festival's long history.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/classical-studies/ancient-history/serving-athena-festival-panathenaia-and-construction-athenian-identities?format=HB&isbn=9781108485272
Primary URL Description: publisher website
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9781108485272
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

Polis and Panathenaia in Hellenistic Athens (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Polis and Panathenaia in Hellenistic Athens
Abstract: Discussion with class about the Polis and the festival of the Panathenaia in Hellenistic Athens. For NYU graduate seminar CLASS-GA 3401: What is Hellenistic Religion
Author: Julia Shear
Date: 11/03/2020
Location: New York University

The Panathenaia at Athens (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: The Panathenaia at Athens
Abstract: Discussion about the Panathenaia festival in Athens for Professor Selene Psoma's graduate seminar at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Author: Julia Shear
Date: 04/21/2021
Location: National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Readers, Viewers, and Inscriptions in Athens in 200 B.C. (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Readers, Viewers, and Inscriptions in Athens in 200 B.C.
Author: Julia Shear
Abstract: In the spring of 200 B.C., when the Athenians declared war on Philip V of Macedon, they voted to destroy statues and inscriptions for Philip and his ancestors (Livy 32.44.4-6). This decision also led to the excising of references to the Macedonian kings and their family in inscriptions. In an important essay, Byrne (2010) reconsidered this material, but he focused on the political circumstances surrounding the events; earlier scholars also concentrated on the historical and political ramifications of this episode (e.g. Habicht 1982: 147-150; Flower 2006: 34-40). They did not ask what this material can tell us about how readers and viewers interacted with these texts. As I shall argue, these erasures show clearly that these inscriptions were expected to be read. The erasures also changed the texts and thus the imagery of the individuals involved. While some changes were benign, others dramatically altered how viewers would engage with the text and understand the imagery.
Date: 01/07/2021
Primary URL: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/152/abstract/readers-viewers-and-inscriptions-athens-200-bc
Primary URL Description: Abstract for conference presentation
Conference Name: AIA/SCS Virtual Annual Meetings

Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memory in Classical Athens (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memory in Classical Athens
Abstract: Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memory in Classical Athens. For the Kosmos Society at the Center for Hellenic Studies.  (The Kosmos Society is an online outreach arm of the Center for Hellenic Studies)
Author: Julia Shear
Date: 03/05/2021
Location: Kosmos Society at the Center for Hellenic Studies
Primary URL: https://kosmossociety.chs.harvard.edu/?p=54585
Primary URL Description: posting about lecture

Tectius illa cupit: Female Pleasure in Ovid’s Ars Amatoria (Article)
Title: Tectius illa cupit: Female Pleasure in Ovid’s Ars Amatoria
Author: Erika Weiberg
Abstract: Tectius illa cupit: Female Pleasure in Ovid’s Ars Amatoria
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.ttupress.org/journals/helios/
Primary URL Description: Journal website
Secondary URL: https://www.worldcat.org/title/helios-journal-of-the-classical-association-of-the-southwest/oclc/2464767
Secondary URL Description: worldcat
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Helios
Publisher: Helios

The Writing on the Mind: Deianeira's Trauma in Sophocles' Trachiniae (Article) [show prizes]
Title: The Writing on the Mind: Deianeira's Trauma in Sophocles' Trachiniae
Author: Erika Weiberg
Abstract: Drawing on modern trauma research and trauma theory, this article argues that Sophocles' Trachiniae dramatizes the psychological wounds of a victim of sexual assault. Through analyses of Deianeira's stories about her past, this article highlights a female perspective on trauma and its disastrous consequences for the victim and her community.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/333586852_The_Writing_on_the_Mind_Deianeira's_Trauma_in_Sophocles'_Trachiniae
Primary URL Description: Bibliographical website
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Phoenix
Publisher: Phoenix

The Writing on the Mind Revisited: Deianeira’s Trauma in Sophocles’ Women of Trachis (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: The Writing on the Mind Revisited: Deianeira’s Trauma in Sophocles’ Women of Trachis
Abstract: Almost every Greek tragedy features a wound. Oedipus’ gouged-out eyes are among the most memorable, but there are many other varieties: combat wounds, animal bites, and even emotional wounds. This last type of trauma dominates the events of Sophocles’ Women of Trachis, which dramatizes the connection between Deianeira’s emotional pain and the physical pain of her husband, Heracles. Over the course of the play, Deianeira narrates the chronic pain and anxiety she feels during Heracles’ cyclical absences, as well as a past incident of sexual violence that continues to affect her even many years later. Drawing on modern trauma research, this talk argues that Sophocles’ Women of Trachis depicts the struggle of putting words to these types of emotional wounds.
Author: Erika Weiberg
Date: 12/02/2020
Location: Cologne Mythological Network, University of Cologne
Primary URL: https://komparatistik.uni-koeln.de/en/juniorprofessur-komparatistik/cologne-mythological-network
Primary URL Description: Network's website, with abstract/announcement.

Erika Weiberg, Duke University, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor (Staff/Faculty/Fellow Position)
Name: Erika Weiberg, Duke University, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor
Abstract: Erika Weiberg, Duke University, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://scholars.duke.edu/person/erika.weiberg
Primary URL Description: department website

Representing the Demos: Adapting Insights from the Constructivist Turn in Political Representation (Article)
Title: Representing the Demos: Adapting Insights from the Constructivist Turn in Political Representation
Author: Matthew Simonton
Abstract: One of the commonest clichés in the study of ancient and modern democracy is the claim that the former is ‘direct’, the latter ‘representative’. A few scholars have recently explored areas in which the Classical Athenian democracy had representative features, particularly the magistracies. These studies continue, however, to understand ‘political representation’ according to the definition proposed by the political scientist Hanna Pitkin, that is, as ‘acting [on the part of the political representative] in the interest of the represented, in a manner responsive to them’. In this paper I introduce the insights of the recent ‘constructivist turn’ in studies of political representation to the analysis of Athenian politics in the hope of suggesting, in what will necessarily be a brief and incomplete exercise, how productive this exciting new paradigm can be for understanding the dynamics of ancient democracy. I first lay out the basic tenets of constructivist representation, particularly the notion of the ‘representative claim’ as developed by the political theorist Michael Saward, and argue for their suitability for studying ancient Greek history and political thought. Next, I adapt the model of the representative claim to two episodes of Athenian democratic deliberation, showing how it illuminates processes of demotic will- and identity-formation. I conclude by briefly underscoring how approaching Athenian politics in terms of constructivist notions of representation restores an aesthetic dimension to ancient democratic debate, one that allows us to compare more productively the ‘demos’ of symbouleutic oratory with its counterparts in poetry, sculpture, and other media, namely as a represented object fashioned for creative and rhetorical purposes.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/ramus/article/abs/representing-the-demos-adapting-insights-from-the-constructivist-turn-in-political-representation/2F38549A95009B043C67D84B9BD8C514
Primary URL Description: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/ramus/article/abs/representing-the-demos-adapting-insights-from-the-constructivist-turn-in-political-representation/2F38549A95009B043C67D84B9BD8C514
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Ramus 50
Publisher: Ramus

Demagogues and Demagoguery in Hellenistic Greece (Article)
Title: Demagogues and Demagoguery in Hellenistic Greece
Author: Matthew Simonton
Abstract: This paper introduces scholars of Greek political thought to the continued existence of the phenomenon of demagoguery, or ‘(mis-)leadership of the people’, in the Hellenistic period. After summarizing Classical elite discourse about demagoguery, I explore three areas in which political leaders continued to run afoul of elite norms in Hellenistic democratic poleis: 1) political persecution of the wealthier members of a political community; 2) ‘pandering to’ the people in a way considered infra dignitatem; and 3) stoking bellicosity among the common people. I show that considerable continuities link the Classical and Hellenistic periods and that demagoguery should be approached as a potential window onto ‘popular culture’ in Greek antiquity.
Year: 2022
Primary URL: https://brill.com/view/journals/agpt/39/1/article-p35_2.xml
Primary URL Description: https://brill.com/view/journals/agpt/39/1/article-p35_2.xml
Access Model: Purchase or subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greekand Roman Political Thought 39.1
Publisher: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greekand Roman Political Thought

Chaos and Social Disorder in Nicolas de Nicolay’s Travel Book, Navigations et pérégrinations orientales (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Chaos and Social Disorder in Nicolas de Nicolay’s Travel Book, Navigations et pérégrinations orientales
Author: Elisabeth Fraser
Abstract: Chaos and Social Disorder in Nicolas de Nicolay’s Travel Book, Navigations et pérégrinations orientales
Date: 11/01/2023
Conference Name: • Ionian University, Corfu and Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, international conference on “Travelers to the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires in Honor of Stephanos Yerasimos."

Louis Dupré in Ottoman Greece: Multiple Identities, Contradictory Encounters (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Louis Dupré in Ottoman Greece: Multiple Identities, Contradictory Encounters
Author: Elizabeth Fraser
Abstract: Louis Dupré in Ottoman Greece: Multiple Identities, Contradictory Encounters
Date: 09/01/2021
Conference Name: British School at Athens, Greece, conference on “Travel and Archaeology in Ottoman Greece in the Age of Revolution, c. 1800-1833."

Two Sultanas and a Beardless Youth: Sexual Politics and the Multiple Audiences of Ottoman Albums (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Two Sultanas and a Beardless Youth: Sexual Politics and the Multiple Audiences of Ottoman Albums
Author: Elizabeth Fraser
Abstract: Two Sultanas and a Beardless Youth: Sexual Politics and the Multiple Audiences of Ottoman Albums
Date: 11/02/2023
Primary URL: https://www.academia.edu/105052610/ICTA_17_Warsaw_2023_provisional_program
Primary URL Description: https://www.academia.edu/105052610/ICTA_17_Warsaw_2023_provisional_program
Conference Name: International Conference on Turkish Art, Warsaw

Two Sultanas and a Beardless Youth: Imperial Authority in a Seventeenth-Century Ottoman Costume Album (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Two Sultanas and a Beardless Youth: Imperial Authority in a Seventeenth-Century Ottoman Costume Album
Author: Elizabeth Fraser
Abstract: Two Sultanas and a Beardless Youth: Imperial Authority in a Seventeenth-Century Ottoman Costume Album
Date: 06/21/2022
Primary URL: https://www.academia.edu/81425379/CIEPO_24_Thessaloniki_2022_Agenda
Primary URL Description: https://www.academia.edu/81425379/CIEPO_24_Thessaloniki_2022_Agenda
Conference Name: Comité International des Études Pré-Ottomanes et Ottomanes (CIEPO), Thessaloniki, Greece

Giordano da Pisa: Remarks on the Authority of Icons from Greece (1306): Translation and Commentary (Book Section)
Title: Giordano da Pisa: Remarks on the Authority of Icons from Greece (1306): Translation and Commentary
Author: John Lansdowne
Editor: Foteini Spingou
Abstract: In this book the beauty and meaning of Byzantine art and its aesthetics are for the first time made accessible through the original sources. More than 150 medieval texts are translated from nine medieval languages into English, with commentaries from over seventy leading scholars. These include theories of art, discussions of patronage and understandings of iconography, practical recipes for artistic supplies, expressions of devotion, and descriptions of cities. The volume reveals the cultural plurality and the interconnectivity of medieval Europe and the Mediterranean from the late eleventh to the early fourteenth centuries. The first part uncovers salient aspects of Byzantine artistic production and its aesthetic reception, while the second puts a spotlight on particular ways of expressing admiration and of interpreting of the visual.
Year: 2022
Primary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/us/universitypress/subjects/history/european-history-1000-1450/sources-byzantine-art-history-volume-3
Primary URL Description: https://www.cambridge.org/us/universitypress/subjects/history/european-history-1000-1450/sources-byzantine-art-history-volume-3
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108483056

Compounding Greekness: St. Katherine ‘the Egyptian’ and the Santa Croce Micromosaic (Article)
Title: Compounding Greekness: St. Katherine ‘the Egyptian’ and the Santa Croce Micromosaic
Title: Compounding Greekness: St. Katherine ‘the Egyptian’ and the Santa Croce Micromosaic
Author: John Lansdowne
Author: John Lansdowne
Abstract: John Lansdowne’s article “Compounding Greekness: St. Katherine ‘the Egyptian’ and the Sta. Croce Micromosaic” is as precisely researched and patiently composed as the enigmatic thing at its center. Today enshrined in the Roman basilica of Santa Croce within a triptych reliquary cabinet constructed at the start of the sixteenth century to evoke the legendary Mass of St. Gregory, the icon presents on its obverse an image of the suffering Christ, painstakingly assembled from thousands of minute tesserae by a thirteenth-century Greek artist. While the material composition of the icon’s public-facing side provides a structuring metaphor for Lansdowne’s project, the true object of his study is the object’s hidden reverse, a palimpsested panel that since the fourteenth century has depicted St. Katherine of Alexandria. That panel, scholars have assumed, was combined with the micromosaic after having been created in Egypt, perhaps at the Monastery of St. Katherine on Mt. Sinai; its concealment in favor of the Man of Sorrows icon anchored the object in a Roman context. In an analysis that exemplifies formal attunement, creatively and adroitly structuring its argument so as to reflect the features of the object discussed, Lansdowne patiently dismantles this scholarly consensus. Piecing together bits of information gleaned from technical studies performed in the course of the icon’s restorations, first in 1959 and again in 1997–99, from renewed iconographic investigations (including a new date), and from a deep review of the social context surrounding its production, Lansdowne convincingly argues that the image of Katherine was layered onto a preexisting image — probably in the Angevin Kingdom of Naples, not in Egypt — and that the iconographic reworking was intended to emphasize the “Greekness” of both Katherine and of the Byzantine icon with which her icon was fused.
Abstract: John Lansdowne’s article “Compounding Greekness: St. Katherine ‘the Egyptian’ and the Sta. Croce Micromosaic” is as precisely researched and patiently composed as the enigmatic thing at its center. Today enshrined in the Roman basilica of Santa Croce within a triptych reliquary cabinet constructed at the start of the sixteenth century to evoke the legendary Mass of St. Gregory, the icon presents on its obverse an image of the suffering Christ, painstakingly assembled from thousands of minute tesserae by a thirteenth-century Greek artist. While the material composition of the icon’s public-facing side provides a structuring metaphor for Lansdowne’s project, the true object of his study is the object’s hidden reverse, a palimpsested panel that since the fourteenth century has depicted St. Katherine of Alexandria. That panel, scholars have assumed, was combined with the micromosaic after having been created in Egypt, perhaps at the Monastery of St. Katherine on Mt. Sinai; its concealment in favor of the Man of Sorrows icon anchored the object in a Roman context. In an analysis that exemplifies formal attunement, creatively and adroitly structuring its argument so as to reflect the features of the object discussed, Lansdowne patiently dismantles this scholarly consensus. Piecing together bits of information gleaned from technical studies performed in the course of the icon’s restorations, first in 1959 and again in 1997–99, from renewed iconographic investigations (including a new date), and from a deep review of the social context surrounding its production, Lansdowne convincingly argues that the image of Katherine was layered onto a preexisting image — probably in the Angevin Kingdom of Naples, not in Egypt — and that the iconographic reworking was intended to emphasize the “Greekness” of both Katherine and of the Byzantine icon with which her icon was fused.
Year: 2021
Year: 2021
Secondary URL: https://www.medievalacademy.org/page/Elliott_Prize_Winner
Secondary URL: https://www.medievalacademy.org/page/Elliott_Prize_Winner
Secondary URL Description: https://www.medievalacademy.org/page/Elliott_Prize_Winner
Secondary URL Description: https://www.medievalacademy.org/page/Elliott_Prize_Winner
Format: Journal
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Gesta
Periodical Title: Gesta
Publisher: Gesta
Publisher: Gesta

Piece by Piece: Mosaic Artifacts in Byzantium and the Ancient Americas (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Piece by Piece: Mosaic Artifacts in Byzantium and the Ancient Americas
Author: John Lansdowne
Abstract: Across premodern cultures, the mosaic artform enjoyed tremendous prestige. In the medieval Mediterranean, no other pictorial medium could rival mosaic’s opulence and visual splendor or claim to entail the same level of technical expertise. Durable and infinitely repairable, mosaics intimated a sense of both history and timelessness. Similarly, in the ancient Americas, the mosaic medium embodied status, wealth, and authority. A range of socially and ritually significant objects, from weapons and jewelry to figurines, were adorned with exquisitely crafted mosaic inlays, featuring such rich materials as turquoise, lapis lazuli, serpentine, and mother-of-pearl. Tellingly, both Byzantine micromosaic icons and ancient American portable mosaic objects would become objects of desire for antiquarians and collectors in early modern Europe. To these later audiences, mosaic epitomized cultures that were, from the European vantage point, geographically and temporally “far away.”
Date Range: May 18  –  19, 2023
Location: Dumbaton Oaks, Washington DC
Primary URL: https://www.doaks.org/events/other-events/piece-by-piece
Primary URL Description: https://www.doaks.org/events/other-events/piece-by-piece

Popular Culture: at the Festival (Book Section)
Title: Popular Culture: at the Festival
Author: Hanna Golab
Editor: Pauline A. LeVen
Editor: David R M Irving
Editor: Alexander Rehding
Editor: Sean A. Gurd
Abstract: In Vol 1: A Cultural History of Western Music in Antiquity. A Cultural History of Western Music is part of The Cultural Histories Series. Titles are available both as printed hardcover sets for libraries needing just one subject or preferring a one-off purchase and tangible reference for their shelves, or as part of a fully-searchable digital library available to institutions by annual subscription or perpetual access (see www.bloomsburyculturalhistory.com).
Year: 2023
Primary URL: https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/cultural-history-of-western-music-9781350075634/
Primary URL Description: https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/cultural-history-of-western-music-9781350075634/
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Book Title: Vol 1: A Cultural History of Western Music in Antiquity
ISBN: 9781350075634

Women’s Poetry in the Service of the Aitolian League (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Women’s Poetry in the Service of the Aitolian League
Author: Hanna Golab
Abstract: Women’s Poetry in the Service of the Aitolian League. Hellenistic poetry is full of powerful women, ranging from Ptolemaic queens and princesses to female divinities and epic heroines. An obvious question is therefore: why do we find so many powerful women in Hellenistic poetry, and in what ways do they differ from previous literary representations of women, for example, in Homeric epic, archaic lyric, and Athenian tragedy.
Date: 09/13/2023
Primary URL: https://hellenisticpoetry.wordpress.com/
Primary URL Description: https://hellenisticpoetry.wordpress.com/
Conference Name: Groningen Workshops on Hellenistic Poetry: Beyond Alexandria

Poetry after War: Antinoos, Mesomedes, and Cyprus’ (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Poetry after War: Antinoos, Mesomedes, and Cyprus’
Author: Hanna Golab
Abstract: Poetry after War: Antinoos, Mesomedes, and Cyprus’
Date: 03/17/2023
Primary URL: https://www.ucy.ac.cy/cph/wp-content/uploads/sites/16/2023/02/Programme_final.pdf
Primary URL Description: https://www.ucy.ac.cy/cph/wp-content/uploads/sites/16/2023/02/Programme_final.pdf
Conference Name: Greek and Latin carmina minora in Context, University of Cyprus

The King and the Falcon: Euripides in an Egyptian Ritual (Article)
Title: The King and the Falcon: Euripides in an Egyptian Ritual
Author: Hanna Golab
Abstract: An ostracon from Edfu (O. Edfu 326 = SH 989) inscribed in the late Ptolemaic period is a fascinating example of cultural hybridity in late Hellenistic Egypt. So far, however, the short text has been analyzed mostly from the Greek perspective and, as a result, remains grossly misinterpreted. This note brings to light the neglected Egyptian dimension of the text and demonstrates that the short song merges Euripides’ Phoenissae with a festival of the Coronation of the Sacred Falcon in Edfu, on the basis of cultic associations of the gods Horus and Helios.
Year: 2022
Primary URL: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/717208?journalCode=cp
Primary URL Description: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/717208?journalCode=cp
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Classical Philology vol. 117, no. 1
Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Trade in the Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean: Evidence and Interpretation in the 21st Century (Article)
Title: Trade in the Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean: Evidence and Interpretation in the 21st Century
Author: Sarah Murray
Abstract: In the Bronze Age Mediterranean, trade was a key mechanism that defined the era’s political, social, and economic dynamism. This paper reviews recent methodological and empirical developments in the study of trade in the Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean, with a focus on the Late Bronze Age. The complexity of the relevant evidence presents nontrivial interpretative challenges, and a variety of schools of thought concerning the methods and approaches best suited for enlightening economic exchange through the study of archaeological remains co-exist. New insights based on empirical study of archaeological evidence have primarily coalesced around topics that have long been central to the study of trade, especially the sources and destinations of metal resources and the distribution of ceramic containers and their contents. Developing areas of emphasis, such as the roles of merchants and traders, have simultaneously emerged. Both novel methods and recent empirical insights highlight the difficulty inherent in attempts to relate artifacts to commercial exchange due to the variety of human and material mobilities apparent in the archaeological record. The path forward for understanding Bronze Age trade economies will require carefully tailoring research questions that may be answered in concrete ways with the evidence available and developing interpretative frameworks that can accommodate both bottom-up views emphasizing individual agency and generalizing models that facilitate comparison through space and time.
Year: 2022
Primary URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10814-022-09177-5
Primary URL Description: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10814-022-09177-5
Access Model: Purchase or Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal of Archaeological Research
Publisher: Journal of Archaeological Research

Perfume Among the Perishing: A (Psycho)Pharmacological Approach to Early Christian Incense Use (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Perfume Among the Perishing: A (Psycho)Pharmacological Approach to Early Christian Incense Use
Author: John Penniman
Abstract: This panel explores the ways human and divine activity in the ancient cosmos were entwined in moments when humans interact with the natural world and its many interconnected ontological levels, whether that be in the form of minerals, plants and animals as part of ancient pharmacology, water and other elements as part of healing and ritual substances and practices, or the stars and planets as guides and predictive forces as part of human efforts to understand their place in the universe. All of these moments were inflected through people’s religious identity and commitments. Moreover, all of these interactions with nature were governed by human arts that worked with and on various natural affordances. The presentations gathered here will also elicit engagement with and reflection on contemporary questions about the way we think of natural resources today in a new plural religious context, with respect to theologically inflected questions of scarcity, equity, and the pursuit of public health and well-being.
Date: 06/19/2023
Primary URL: https://euare2023.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/
Primary URL Description: https://euare2023.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/
Secondary URL: https://www.eventsforce.net/standrews/frontend/reg/thome.csp?pageID=135470&eventID=161&traceRedir=2
Secondary URL Description: https://www.eventsforce.net/standrews/frontend/reg/thome.csp?pageID=135470&eventID=161&traceRedir=2
Conference Name: European Academy of Religion: St. Andrews, Scotland (June 2023) and the Leeds International Medieval Congress

One Infirmity after Another: Symptom and Self in Early Christian Letters (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: One Infirmity after Another: Symptom and Self in Early Christian Letters
Author: John Penniman
Abstract: One Infirmity after Another: Symptom and Self in Early Christian Letters
Date: 11/01/2022
Primary URL: https://www.google.com/search?q=Healthcare+and+Disability+in+the+Ancient+World+section+of+the+Society+of+Biblical+Literature+annual+meeting%3A+Denver%2C+CO&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS960US960&oq=Healthcare+and+Disability+in+the+Ancient+World+section+of+the+Society+o
Primary URL Description: https://www.google.com/search?q=Healthcare+and+Disability+in+the+Ancient+World+section+of+the+Society+of+Biblical+Literature+annual+meeting%3A+Denver%2C+CO&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS960US960&oq=Healthcare+and+Disability+in+the+Ancient+World+section+of+the+Society+of+Biblical+Literature+annual+meeting%3A+Denver%2C+CO&gs_lcrp=EgZjaHJvbWUyBggAEEUYOdIBBzI4NmowajmoAgCwAgA&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Conference Name: Healthcare and Disability in the Ancient World section of the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting: Denver, CO

Rendering the Body in Pain: Pathography in Late Ancient Letters (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Rendering the Body in Pain: Pathography in Late Ancient Letters
Author: John Penniman
Abstract: Rendering the Body in Pain: Pathography in Late Ancient Letters
Date: 10/08/2022
Primary URL: https://classics.uc.edu/departments/classics/privatearea/public-and-business-calendars/corpus-et-cultura-conference
Primary URL Description: https://classics.uc.edu/departments/classics/privatearea/public-and-business-calendars/corpus-et-cultura-conference
Conference Name: lecture sponsored by the Center for Hellenic Studies at UC San Diego (November 2022) and at Corpora et Cultura: The Body and Cultural Production in the Ancient Mediterranean, a symposium hosted by the Classics Department at the University of Cincinnati


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