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Grant program: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery Grants

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12
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 51 items in 2 pages
Award Number Grant ProgramAward RecipientProject TitleAward PeriodApproved Award Total
12
Page size:
 51 items in 2 pages
MD-226651-15Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsBrown UniversityExploring the Four Elements: Toward a Digital Environmental History of the Americas1/1/2015 - 6/30/2016$29,755.00Neil Safier   Brown UniversityProvidenceRI02912-9100USA2014History of ScienceDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29755029247.380

Development of a series of online and on-site exhibits examining the ways that the ecological elements of earth, air, fire, and water were interpreted by the inhabitants of the early Americas.

This proposal, submitted to the NEH Division of Public Programs for a Digital Projects for the Public Discovery Grant, constitutes a request in the amount of $29,755 to support the exploratory phase of a project to bring a new humanities initiative at the John Carter Brown Library to a much broader public than has traditionally been the case for the Library’s exhibitions and scholarly projects. “Exploring the Four Elements: Toward a Digital Environmental History of the Americas” takes a simple concept, the cultural significance of earth, air, fire, and water to the diverse populations of the Americas, from the continents’ earliest indigenous inhabitants to the last waves of European scientific explorers at the end of the colonial period, and examines the ramifications of human engagement with these elements as a window onto changing ecological relationships throughout the pre-contact and early modern periods in the early Americas.

MD-226668-15Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillDigital Civil Rights Radio1/1/2015 - 6/30/2016$28,323.00SethM.Kotch   University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillNC27599-1350USA2014JournalismDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs28323019739.440

Development of a website that makes accessible and interprets digitized recordings of non-commercial, independent radio station broadcasts providing local accounts of the civil rights and black power movements.

"Digital Civil Rights Radio" seeks to explore a digital project around a growing body of historic radio recordings from non-commercial, often black-owned, radio stations that operated in the 1970s and 1980s. These stations, founded by activists inspired by but unsatisfied with the gains of the civil rights movement, expanded upon and redirected the movement's energy in response to local needs and the politics of the Black Power movement. These recordings, not heard since they originally aired, require digitization. And moreover, they call out for a public re-airing. This project will take the initial steps toward developing a robust, public facing digital infrastructure around the recordings, making them visible, accessible, and crucially, hearable for the first time in decades. And it will integrate them into an immersive digital experience that when coupled with public programming will model a new style of effective, engaged humanities scholarship.

MD-226669-15Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsHistoric Hudson ValleySlavery in the North Website1/1/2015 - 12/31/2015$30,000.00RossW.Higgins   Historic Hudson ValleyPocantico HillsNY10591-1203USA2014African American StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a website that explores northern slavery through individual stories that illustrate how enslaved people endured and resisted the institution of slavery.

Historic Hudson Valley's website project will address the history of slavery in the colonial North, with a special focus on individuality and resistance. It is an outgrowth of our NEH-funded reinterpretation of Philipsburg Manor, HHV’s National Historic Landmark in Sleepy Hollow, NY, where we have been presenting the history of northern colonial slavery--and, later, incorporating themes of individuality and resistance--for years. HHV is determined to bring this personalized history online and engage with the public in new, exciting ways. Through Discovery, HHV will: 1) Convene a select group of humanities scholars, museum professionals, education advisors, and digital media experts; 2) Identify, update, and prioritize our humanities content involving northern colonial enslavement and resistance; 3) Determine how content will be structured and presented online to engage a 21st-century audience; and 4) Create a design document that details the fundamental aspects of the website.

MD-226680-15Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsRichard Stockton College of New JerseyPox in the City: A 3-D Strategy Game for the History of Medicine1/1/2015 - 7/31/2016$99,837.00Lisa Rosner   Richard Stockton College of New JerseyGallowayNJ08205-9441USA2014U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs998370998370

Development of a prototype of an interactive, web-based game on an early 19th-century smallpox outbreak in Philadelphia.

Stockton College is requesting $99,837 to develop a working prototype that demonstrates the humanities ideas, technology, and public outreach for "Pox in the City", a Unity 3D strategy game. "Pox in the City" draws upon a core interpretive framework for medical history, that beliefs, practices, and treatment are shaped by the interaction of the healer, the patient, and the disease entity. Players take on the role of a physician who has arrived in Philadelphia just as a smallpox outbreak erupts. Armed only with Edward Jenner’s new vaccination technique, players undertake the challenge of preventing the spread of the disease by persuading patients to be vaccinated. The interactive format will immerse players in the city’s rich history, as they experience the choices made by historical actors and constrained by scientific knowledge and cultural values. The prototype is being designed by Eduweb and developed in partnership with the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

MD-226682-15Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsNew SchoolThe Creation of Digital Memorialization Applications for the AIDS Memorial Quilt1/1/2015 - 6/30/2016$30,000.00Anne Balsamo   New SchoolNew YorkNY10011-8871USA2014U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of web-based “public interactives” to provide cultural and social history for the AIDS Memorial Quilt.

We request funding to extend and expand functionality of the AIDS Quilt Touch media system to incorporate stories as a mode of user-engagement. If funded, this project will result in the prototype of an interactive digital narrative through multimedia tours (via an online platform). The tours will be designed around key humanities themes.

MD-226699-15Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of Southern CaliforniaWalden, a game1/1/2015 - 6/30/2016$100,000.00TracyJ.Fullerton   University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesCA90089-0012USA2014U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs100000099999.330

The creation of a prototype for a first-person video game that allows players to engage with author Henry David Thoreau’s first year at Walden Pond.

Prototype for a unique video game based on the writings of the American author Henry David Thoreau at Walden Pond. Designed and directed by game designer Tracy Fullerton, "Walden, a game," will simulate the experiment in living made by Thoreau at Walden Pond in 1845-47, allowing players to walk in his virtual footsteps, attend to the tasks of living a self-reliant existence, discover in the beauty of a virtual landscape the ideas and writings of this unique philosopher, and cultivate through the game play their own thoughts and responses to the concepts discovered there. The humanities content of the game will focus on an interactive translation of Thoreau’s writings and will also include references to the historical context of those writings. The game takes place in the environment of 1845 New England, when new technologies such as the railroad, the telegraph were first being seen and were part of the changes to the pace of life that Thoreau so articulately resisted in his critiques of society.

MD-234145-16Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of VirginiaParticipatory Media1/1/2016 - 6/30/2018$29,587.00GraceE.Hale   University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleVA22903-4833USA2015Public HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29587029586.980

A series of meetings and workshops that explore possible digital platforms and approaches to bring to the public a curated set of community documentary films from the 1960s and 1970s.

Participatory Media interactively engages with and presents participatory community media from the 1960s and 1970s. Participatory Media will centralize disparate archives of community media and place them in the larger context of America’s public documentary record. The project will also bring to light the development of participatory media practices, and the social and cultural history of American communities during this era. Through the discovery phase, the project will explore how to provide access to community-made, rare, and often publicly-funded moving images and their related archives; provide a model for community involvement in digital public humanities work, specifically participatory archival, curatorial, and exhibition work; and employ innovative technologies to enable digital participation on multiple levels. The final product of this discovery grant will be design documents that include user interface specifications, technology requirements, and wireframes.

MD-253223-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsNew York Academy of MedicineBiography of a Book1/1/2017 - 12/31/2017$30,000.00Robin Naughton   New York Academy of MedicineNew YorkNY10029-5207USA2016History and Philosophy of Science, Technology, and MedicineDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of an interactive exhibition that explores the production and use of 12 books and manuscripts to illustrate how knowledge was transferred through books.

The New York Academy of Medicine Library, one of the most extensive rare book collections in in the country, has selected and digitized 12 items for our project, Biography of a Book. Through the stories that underpin each book we will show the context for production, collection, and use, all with their distinctive cultures, technologies, and structures, their institutional challenges and supports. The final goal of the project is to produce an innovative, interactive exhibit that will engage the public in a dialogue about how specialized knowledge was transferred over time through the medium of books. This grant will support an advisory panel in the areas of history of medicine, history of the book, digital humanities, user research and technology to aid our development by providing feedback on content and on user experience. The end product for the Discovery Grant will be a design document that supports the future implementation and production of our Biography of a Book project.

MD-253224-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPresident and Fellows of Harvard CollegeLearning Experiences about the Declaration of Independence1/1/2017 - 6/30/2017$30,000.00Danielle Allen   President and Fellows of Harvard CollegeCambridgeMA02138-3800USA2016U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000029999.920

Development of interactive tools for middle and high school students based upon the grievances and rights articulated by British colonists in the Declaration of Independence.

“Portrait of a Tyrant” is a point-and-click adventure game where the player explores the historical stories behind the grievances and rights articulated in the Declaration of Independence. This game aims to teach humanities content and critical thinking and to cultivate civic readiness, and will support instruction of the Declaration in language arts, social studies, and U.S. history contexts.

MD-253228-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsCarnegie Museums of PittsburghEvaluating Digital Platforms for an Immersive Ancient Egyptian Experience1/1/2017 - 12/31/2017$29,962.00Erin Peters   Carnegie Museums of PittsburghPittsburghPA15213-4007USA2016Cultural AnthropologyDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs199679995199679995

Development of an immersive digital platform for new exhibitions on ancient Egypt.

Carnegie Museum of Natural History is applying for an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery grant to initiate first-stage research and planning and produce a design document for an immersive virtual experience that will be central to the museum’s future exhibition, Egypt on the Nile. Discovery grant funding will allow the museum to investigate best possible options for the content and digital platform for the exhibit, which will virtually simulate a journey on the Nile in the royal funerary boat of pharaoh Senwosret III (c. 1887-1848 BCE), which was excavated at Dahshur and is currently in the museum’s Egyptian collection. This rare boat is one of only four known in museum collections excavated at Dahshur, and its study is important for scholarship in Egyptology, maritime archaeology, and art history. We propose to virtually recreate the boat’s original construction, use, and appearance, so it can be an emotive vessel for virtual travel in an immersive museum experience.

MD-253238-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsGeorge Mason UniversityHearing the Americas1/1/2017 - 12/31/2017$29,996.00SheilaA.Brennan   George Mason UniversityFairfaxVA22030-4444USA2016U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29996029922.50

Development of a website that explores the transnational history of American popular music.

George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media is seeking a Digital Projects for the Public Discovery grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to plan an accessible, digital public humanities project that will increase users’ understanding of the transnational roots of American popular music. The digitized music collections available in the Library of Congress’s (LC) National Jukebox and the University of California at Santa Barbara’s (UCSB) Cylinder Audio Archive will provide the building blocks for the team to design a digital project that will ask users how well they know their music history and invite them to discover a rich contextual network of other historical collections. The grant funds will allow the team to research the audio and archival collections; conduct audience research; draft the information architecture, test with users, and to produce a design document that will lay out how the project will proceed in future phases.

MD-253242-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsValparaiso UniversityFlight Paths: Mapping Our Changing Neighborhoods1/1/2017 - 6/30/2018$30,000.00AllisonE.Schuette   Valparaiso UniversityValparaisoIN46383-4520USA2016U.S. Regional StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of an interactive website that examines the impact of de-urbanization in the Rust Belt revealed by the changing racial and socioeconomic demographics of Gary, Indiana.

Flight Paths is a multi-media initiative where participants engage and analyze factors contributing to de-urbanization and the fracturing of neighborhoods in post-industrial America specifically Gary, Indiana. An interactive website will explore the impact of white and green flight in the region, and will include a rich array of historical material and first-person stories. Users will juxtapose the stories of “neighbors” and analyze the sociopolitical and economic factors of de-urbanization. Users will be able to upload mental maps,stories,photographs, and an innovative map interface where they will visually experience “flight” paths of residents from the 1960s to present. Public exhibitions and toolkits for community conversations will help participants more deeply understand the ongoing impact of de-urbanization and the interconnected nature of regional life in the presence of neighbors with whom new civic relationships can be forged, potentially catalyzing participants for civic change.

MD-253272-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsNew York Foundation for the Arts, Inc.Incorrigibles1/1/2017 - 5/31/2018$30,000.00Alison Cornyn   New York Foundation for the Arts, Inc.BrooklynNY11201-8301USA2016Women's HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs250005000250005000

Development of a multiplatform project that examines the history of detention facilities and incarceration of young women from the early 20th century to the present.

Incorrigibles is a transmedia public memory project that looks at youth incarceration, specifically as it concerns young women from the early 1900’s to present day. The project plans to use multiple media sharing platforms, social networking, a website and podcasts to collect, display and distribute documents, photographs, films, oral histories, newspaper articles, stories and participatory voices related to the history of incarcerated girls and young women—in particular, young women’s detention facilities and training schools.

MD-253319-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsCarnegie Hall SocietyA History of African American Music: Interactive Digital Timeline Discovery Project1/1/2017 - 12/31/2017$30,000.00Christopher Amos   Carnegie Hall SocietyNew YorkNY10019-3293USA2016African American StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a web experience and on-site interactives focused on the history of African American music at Carnegie Hall.

Carnegie Hall requests an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery Grant of $30,000 to support the exploratory phase of an initiative to update and relaunch an existing interactive digital timeline of the history of African American music. The project seeks to modernize the timeline from several perspectives: design and technology, chronology, and thematic content. In its current form, the timeline’s technical infrastructure is outdated and has only limited multimedia functionality. Recognizing the enduring value of this resource and the importance of this area of American music history, Carnegie Hall is committed to redeveloping the timeline.The goal of the discovery phase work is to develop a design document that demonstrates the integration of humanities ideas, digital technology, and public outreach strategies for the updated interactive timeline.

MD-253338-17Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsExploratoriumBuried Ships and the San Francisco Coast Line1/16/2017 - 12/22/2017$30,000.00Robert Rothfarb   ExploratoriumSan FranciscoCA94111-1454USA2016Urban HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a place-based mobile app that explores the history of the changing landscape of downtown San Francisco by investigating the more than 65 ships buried beneath the city.

The Exploratorium proposes to develop a design document for, Buried Ships and the Coastline of San Francisco, a place-base designed mobile app that will allow users to discover elements of historical, cultural, and scientific interest about the world below their feet. There are over 65 ships buried below the downtown San Francisco area that are often encountered and uncovered during building construction projects that remain a link to the past and are rich historical assets that continue to captivate public interest. Using the wealth of artifacts under the visitor’s feet as tangible entry points to the maritime history of the city, the app will use geolocative maps, overlays, and multimedia augmentations to provide an immersive experience that can meaningfully engage users in the stories of the changing coastline and its impact on the urbanization of San Francisco’s past, present and future.

MD-258819-18Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsCalifornia Institute for Rural StudiesThe Animated Atlas of California Farming History1/1/2018 - 12/31/2018$30,000.00Ildi Carlisle-Cummins   California Institute for Rural StudiesDavisCA95617-1047USA2017Rural StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of an interactive, multimedia atlas exploring the people, places, and events that shaped key moments in California agriculture.

The Animated Atlas of California Farming History will encourage public thought and dialogue around key historical moments in the development of an industry that has shaped the way America—and the world—eats. The atlas will create a series of online maps that deepen user engagement with an existing set of stories that dig into what may seem like a straightforward subject to uncover often surprising tales of human triumph, loss, ingenuity, abuse and connection. Discovery funding will focus a broad group of scholars on: 1) selecting the best digital platform, 2) designing an engaging user interface, 3) exploring the feasibility of illustrating “alternative” histories using digital mapping programs and 4) identifying digital team members who will build a prototype atlas. Our digital project team will craft a design plan for producing maps that reveal how stories affected the California landscape and spark vibrant public discussion about how that landscape might have looked differently.

MD-258841-18Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsgallupARTS, Inc.Gallup’s WPA Art Collection: Exploring Past & Present Perspectives in a Virtual Art Exhibit1/1/2018 - 12/31/2018$30,000.00RoseAlexaEason   gallupARTS, Inc.GallupNM87301-6205USA2017Art History and CriticismDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a website showcasing Gallup, New Mexico’s collection of New Deal art.

gallupARTS proposes to design a website showcasing Gallup, NM’s unique collection of New Deal art. A New Deal Federal Art Center, Gallup is home to ~90 New Deal artworks, from paintings to tinwork light fixtures. Currently housed in four separate locations, this collection is disjointed and mostly inaccessible. It is largely forgotten/overlooked, and consequently underutilized as a humanities resource. The proposed project would digitally unify the collection, making it publicly accessible and able to be interpreted. Bringing together art historians, historians and cultural studies experts alongside web developers, designers and digital archivists, this project would also involve local artists, creatives and stakeholders in planning a creative, dynamic, community-based engaging virtual art exhibit, featuring both scholarly and creative content. The website will also function as a digital archive helping to preserve and protect the at-risk collection.

MD-258873-18Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of Texas, AustinCommunities of Care: Voices of Healing and Endurance1/1/2018 - 12/31/2019$30,000.00PaulineT.Strong   University of Texas, AustinAustinTX78712-0100USA2017Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000028569.460

Development of an online interactive exhibition of patient and medical practitioner testimonials from six to eight Central Texas communities.

Communities of Care: Documenting Voices of Healing and Endurance is a community-based multimedia storytelling project focusing on illness and healthcare narratives. This project will generate and curate its own archive by asking participants to produce narratives through writing, photography, video, and oral histories.

MD-263786-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsGeorge Mason UniversityAll the Appalachian Trails1/1/2019 - 12/31/2019$29,997.00TheodoreMillsKelly   George Mason UniversityFairfaxVA22030-4444USA2018History, GeneralDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29997026748.460

Development of an interactive website tracing the history of the Appalachian Trail and visualizing the significant changes to the trail.

“All the Appalachian Trails” will provide a new way of making sense of the history of the Appalachian Trail—America’s oldest and most iconic long distance hiking trail. Since its completion in 1937, the Appalachian Trail has been re-routed many times, either to take advantage of more scenic locations, to avoid property disputes with local landowners, or to avoid natural or man made hazards. As a result, the Appalachian Trail walked by hikers today takes a very different route than the trail walked by hikers in 1937. We will be using the most current geospatial techniques, combined with the best practices of digital humanities, to create a free and interactive resource that that allows users to chart, examine, and make sense of the many routes of the Trail over time, and the ways that the history of the Trail and the communities through which it passes have been influenced by historical developments.

MD-263817-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsFordham UniversityTowards a Complete History of Art: Building an Interface that Connects Museum Data Internationally1/1/2019 - 12/31/2019$29,940.00Laura Auricchio   Fordham UniversityBronxNY10458-9993USA2018Art History and CriticismDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs299400299400

Development of a digital search tool connecting museum art object databases.

The proposed research group aims to build a digital platform that connects museum data internationally using the data provided by museums. Although in reality museums are connected through the exchange of their traveling works of art, until today, we do not have an interface that evidences a traceable art history of these exchanges. The digital platform that we are aiming to design will create a new kind of knowledge production for scholars, artists, curators, educators, and an interested public. We will be meeting for two 2-day workshops with a group of ten scholars, engineers, designers, and museum experts to collaboratively create a design document in order to implement and build the digital platform. The approach of this proposal has a clear design focus in data visualization and interactive usability of an interface that would create new scholarship in the digital humanities and a new understanding of a connected art history in the museum context.

MD-263863-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of California, BerkeleyTokyo’s Long Nineteenth Century: A Cultural Atlas of the City, 1787-19231/1/2019 - 5/31/2023$30,000.00Jonathan Zwicker   University of California, BerkeleyBerkeleyCA94704-5940USA2018East Asian StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of an online cultural atlas of the city of Edo/Tokyo in the years 1787–1923.

This proposal seeks funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the initial Discovery phase of a project that aims to consider the ways in which the University of California, Berkeley can leverage digital platforms in order to create a work of public scholarship that explores the cultural history of the city of Edo/Tokyo from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. The idea for this project of a cultural atlas emerges out of the particular institutional setting that the University of California provides. The University’s collections, housed in the C.V. Starr East Asia Library and the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive have a breadth and range that makes them unique in North America and particularly suited for a project that seeks to engage public interest in the humanities by drawing links between and among cultural objects of various forms and media.

MD-263893-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of ConnecticutCourtroom 600: An Educational Virtual Reality Encounter with the History and Legacies of the Nuremberg Trials1/1/2019 - 3/31/2020$25,832.00Kenneth Thompson   University of ConnecticutStorrsCT06269-9000USA2018Public HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs25832023359.540

Development of a virtual reality experience on the trials of Nazi leadership at Nuremberg, Germany (1945–49).

Courtroom 600, an educational virtual reality experience, will engage learners in historical thinking as they explore Holocaust history and its human rights legacies through the lens of the trials at Nuremberg, Germany (1945-49), which sought to hold the Nazi regime and colluders accountable and forge standards for international criminal law. The interactive, inquiry-based experience tasks learners, as members of the US prosecutorial team, with investigating documents, photographs, and other primary sources to piece together evidence. The project demonstrates how open-source game and library information systems platforms can connect to increase the discoverability and uses of digital collections, in this case executive trial counsel Thomas J. Dodd’s papers at the University of Connecticut. Courtroom 600’s capacity to provide emotionally-immersive experiences also suggests paths by which museums and archives might connect rising generations to the value of collections research.

MD-263902-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsSUNY Research Foundation, AlbanyRemembering Lost Places: A Digital History of Urban Renewal1/1/2019 - 8/31/2020$30,000.00DavidPaulHochfelder   SUNY Research Foundation, AlbanyAlbanyNY12222-0001USA2018History, GeneralDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000027451.860

Development of an interactive website examining the history of urban renewal through the historical experience of Albany, New York.

We are applying for a Discovery Grant to support planning for a place-based, people-centered responsive website, which will explore how urban renewal transformed one mid-sized American city—Albany, NY. The literature on urban renewal has focused on major metropolitan areas. Yet smaller cities were more profoundly affected. While Albany’s redevelopment is a particularly dramatic example, this city’s experience is representative of many others and will help illuminate a neglected aspect of the nation’s urban history. The Remembering Lost Places website will be a resource for cities still coming to terms with urban renewal. For this grant, we will undertake three elements of the overall project: a design document for the subsequent prototyping phase; an interpretive framework that explores how the Albany experience can help us understand the social, political, and economic impact of urban renewal nationally; and outreach strategies to reach broader audiences.

MD-263921-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsBoise State University'This Ain’t No Lunch Bucket Town': The Evolution of Urban Identity in Boise, Idaho1/1/2019 - 2/29/2020$30,000.00Jennifer Stevens   Boise State UniversityBoiseID83725-0001USA2018Urban StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000025644.740

Development of an interactive website and signage at ten sites in Boise, Idaho, to examine the impact of deindustrialization on the city.

“’This Ain’t No Lunch Bucket Town’: The Evolution of Urban Identity in Boise, Idaho” will explore deindustrialization in Boise, Idaho and its impact on equitable development. Studying this small western city offers a new perspective on the influence of deindustrialization where most humanities conversations favor Rust Belt and east coast cities. The project examines how the demolition of Boise’s industrial sites and their displaced communities contributed to the rise of the city’s urban green-over, creating a postmodern urban identity focused on the quality of life amenities, including green space, recreation, and public lands. Drawing on a public history framework, our team will assess how this change contributes to the sociological construction of whiteness in this racially homogenous city. We will deploy digital methods to animate former industrial uses, restore the memory of past historic uses, and foster diversity and a sense of place for long-time residents as well as newcomers.

MD-263922-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of Kentucky Research FoundationThe Anatolian Trail: An Indo-European Adventure1/1/2019 - 3/31/2020$30,000.00AndrewM.Byrd   University of Kentucky Research FoundationLexingtonKY40506-0004USA2018LinguisticsDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000029998.090

Preliminary development of a video game on Proto-Indo-European and ancient Indo-European languages and cultures.

In this proposal, we request an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery Grant to develop preliminary work on the video game The Anatolian Trail: An Indo-European Adventure, which will be designed to engage a broad audience on the scholarship of Proto-Indo-European and ancient Indo-European (IE) languages and cultures. The game will be set in the age of the Indo-Europeans, a prehistoric tribe that split into many of the cultures of Eurasia from the past 5000 years. By battling ancient monsters from IE folklore, gaining blessings from the gods of the IE pantheon, and even conversing with the locals in their native tongue, players will be able to experience first-hand the results of two centuries of scholarship.

MD-263929-19Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsHistoric Hudson ValleyCuffee’s Trial: A Digital Graphic Novel1/1/2019 - 12/31/2019$30,000.00ElizabethL.Bradley   Historic Hudson ValleyPocantico HillsNY10591-1203USA2018African American HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of an interactive digital graphic work of non-fiction examining the 1741 New York Conspiracy through the trial of Cuffee, an enslaved man.

Historic Hudson Valley (HHV) requests discovery funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to fund the exploratory stages of the creation of a digital graphic novel provisionally titled Cuffee’s Trial. This product will depict the trial, and the historical circumstances surrounding the trial, of Cuffee, an enslaved man accused of conspiracy to commit insurrection in colonial New York. Cuffee, who was among the first of 37 men and women to be tried, convicted, and sentenced to death for what would come to be known as the New York Conspiracy, had a direct connection to Philipsburg Manor, HHV’s National Historic Landmark in Sleepy Hollow, New York. Cuffee’s Trial represents both HHV’s deep expertise in relaying the history of slavery in the north and our commitment to sharing this knowledge extensively through dynamic digital storytelling. The completed digital graphic novel will become part of our constellation of Slavery in the Colonial North digital products.

MD-268918-20Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsFlorida Atlantic UniversityExploring the Roots of Freedom: Augmented Reality Tour for Mitchelville South Carolina Gullah-Geechee Heritage Site3/1/2020 - 2/28/2021$30,000.00Christopher Maraffi   Florida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonFL33431-6424USA2019African American HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000029388.160

Development of a multiformat project on the history of Mitchelville, South Carolina, the first Freedman’s town in the United States during the Civil War.

Mitchelville was the first Freedman’s town in the United States during the Civil War, a central feature of the Port Royal Experiment in African American self-governance, and now a Gullah-Geechee heritage site on Hilton Head Island South Carolina. Our project is to create an augmented reality tour application that will immerse site visitors in Mitchelville’s rich history and culture. Tourists will be able to literally follow in the footsteps of figures from history, picking up virtual 3D artifacts to examine, and interact with historical personalities like Harriet Tubman, General Mitchel, and Robert Smalls. The augmented reality tour will feature Gullah-Geechee storytelling and dance performances to make the experience more culturally diverse and authentic for year-round visitors to the park. Our goal is to present Reconstruction history as both educational and entertaining for visitors to a heritage site, while digitally preserving its cultural assets for future generations.

MD-268947-20Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsLouisiana State University and A&M CollegeLouisiana’s Hidden History of Japanese Internment3/1/2020 - 3/31/2023$29,999.00Hayley Johnson   Louisiana State University and A&M CollegeBaton RougeLA70803-0001USA2019U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs299990297870

The discovery phase of a curated digital archive of materials relating to Japanese internment in Louisiana during World War II.

Identify and bring together collections on Camp Livingston and Camp Algiers

MD-268969-20Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPresident and Board of Trustees of Santa Clara College(Re)Membering Mission History3/1/2020 - 2/28/2022$24,997.00AmyJeanLueck   President and Board of Trustees of Santa Clara CollegeSanta ClaraCA95053-0001USA2019Composition and RhetoricDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs24997024913.960

Development of an augmented reality and virtual reality experience to explore the history of the Santa Clara de Asís mission.

Seeking funding to support the exploratory phase of a project using VR/AR technologies to engage the public with the native history and culture. Building on historical research and the lived experiences of this land, "(Re)Membering Mission History" will involve tribal representatives, diverse scholars, and community stakeholders in the planning and design of a virtual public history project that engages a broad range of perspectives in relation to the history of our campus''s land.

MD-277030-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsSUNY Research Foundation, College at Old WestburyVirtual Aquapolis: An Interactive VR Documentary About New York Harbor3/1/2021 - 1/31/2023$30,000.00SamaraAmandaSmith   SUNY Research Foundation, College at Old WestburyOld WestburyNY11568-1717USA2020Urban StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000029897.010

The discovery phase of an interactive VR project about the history of New York Harbor and the interrelationship between the harbor’s ecosystem and the city above.

Virtual Aquapolis, an interactive VR humanities project about the past, present and future of New York Harbor. Incorporating a combination of elements--archival photography, film and audio, animation, underwater video, expert interviews and narration-- this project will explore how human culture, values and practices have altered the harbor’s underwater ecosystems over time, and how the natural world has shaped the city above. Drawing on work from leading humanities scholars, Virtual Aquapolis examines how human culture informs the harbor’s past and present, and shapes collective visions for the harbor’s future. Virtual Aquapolis will be designed to engage the public in a variety of ways: through gallery and museum installations; as a teaching resource; and through a series of free public events on NYC’s Governors Island waterfront. An accompanying Virtual Aquapolis website will offer a free mobile phone and VR helmet-compatible download of the documentary.

MD-277035-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsSUNY Research Foundation, College at BrockportThe Berkeley Folk Music Festival, 1958-19706/1/2021 - 8/31/2022$30,000.00MichaelJacobKramer   SUNY Research Foundation, College at BrockportBrockportNY14420-2997USA2020Cultural HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000029963.080

Development of a website with interactive essays, podcasts, and a curated archive on the Berkeley Folk Music Festival.

By digitally investigating a crucial, but little-studied folk music festival that took place annually on the flagship University of California campus between 1958 and 1970, the Berkeley Folk Music Festival Project helps diverse audiences explore the history of the folk music revival within the broader context of the post-World War II American past. An NEH DPP Discovery Grant will allow us to set the stage for dynamic multimedia curation. The curation includes: a top-level of "bespoke" interactive storytelling introductory narratives; a customized WordPress platform for deeper inquiry; an audio documentary podcast series with contributions from younger musicians; and thematic tagging of an open-source, digitized, 36,000-object archive. Taken together, these will help the public encounter and grapple with the hopeful, yet fraught legacies of race, ethnicity, gender, class, region, heritage, and cultural representation within the folk revival milieu.

MD-277043-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsHigh Desert MuseumRemapping the High Desert: Toward a New Look into Time and Space3/1/2021 - 7/31/2022$30,000.00Dana Whitelaw   High Desert MuseumBendOR97708-5035USA2020Interdisciplinary Studies, GeneralDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a digital map illuminating the dynamic relationships between the people, wildlife, and landscapes of the High Desert.

The High Desert Museum requests a $30,000 Discovery Grant to develop Remapping the High Desert—an online project that will connect broad audiences to the dynamic relationships between the people, wildlife and landscapes of the High Desert. Despite its significant size and importance to the nation, the High Desert is one of the least studied and understood aspects of the American West. Using innovative design, this project will uncover the many layers of stories and relationships embedded in the vast landscape of the High Desert. Drawing from remapping concepts, the content and approach will prioritize diverse perspectives, including recognizing the High Desert as the ancestral homeland of Indigenous people. Users will also be able to share their experiences. Through this Discovery Grant, we will implement the planning phase of Remapping the High Desert and bring together a wide range of humanities scholars and digital media experts to develop major concepts and design elements.

MD-277054-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsVirginia TechExperiencing Civil War History Through Augmented Reality: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Environment at Pamplin Historical Park3/1/2021 - 2/28/2022$30,000.00PaulD.QuigleyTim TalbottVirginia TechBlacksburgVA24061-2000USA2020U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000024733.760

Research and development of an augmented reality application that will enhance visitor learning about the lives of African Americans and the Civil War's impact on the environment. 

We are designing an Augmented Reality application for visitors to Pamplin Historical Park in Petersburg, Virginia. At its museums, battlefield, and historic homes, Pamplin HP educates large public audiences of all ages about Civil War history. Our application will share new stories, informed by current humanities scholarship, presented in innovative ways. Using mobile devices, visitors will learn about less familiar Civil War topics: interconnections between the environment and military affairs; the war’s transformative impact on African Americans and other civilians; and the benefits of reading wartime documents with a historian’s eye. On their phone or tablet, they will construct their own fortifications and overlay them onto the real world. They will experience multimedia guided interpretations of documents from this place, see video of historians sharing diverse perspectives, and more. Visualizing the past in new ways will inspire deeper empathy, curiosity, and understanding.

MD-277076-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPocumtuck Valley Memorial AssociationLucy Terry Prince: A Window into African American Life in Early Rural New England4/1/2021 - 6/30/2022$30,000.00TimothyC.Neumann   Pocumtuck Valley Memorial AssociationDeerfieldMA01342-5004USA2020African American HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a website addressing the experience of African Americans in Revolutionary-era New England.

Our project plans for a website to increase understanding of the lives of African Americans in early rural New England. Its narrative focus will be Lucy Terry Prince, the first documented African American poet. Her life, from birth and captivity in Africa c.1730 to enslavement in Deerfield, MA, to her death as a free woman in Vermont in 1821, encompasses signal events in the lives of enslaved people. Lucy’s life illuminates important aspects of the Revolutionary-era: a) how the slave trade and enslaved African American labor were instrumental in creating a thriving maritime economy in colonial New England; b) how desire for independence fueled by that economy gave rise to Revolutionary political principles that enslaved people seized upon to obtain their freedom; c) how African Americans struggled to enact those principles as free citizens after the Revolution; and d) how, in this context African Americans expressed their creativity and made important contributions to American culture.

MD-277080-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsBoise State UniversityRecovering the Histories of Communities Inundated by Snake River Dams5/1/2021 - 9/30/2023$29,838.00BobH.Reinhardt   Boise State UniversityBoiseID83725-0001USA2020U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29838028153.930

Development of a digital history project to explore communities inundated by the building of the Snake River dams during the twentieth century.

Digital public history project that will investigate, interpret, and communicate the histories of communities inundated by the development of hydroelectric and irrigation projects on the Snake River in Wyoming, Idaho, and Washington

MD-277081-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsThomas Cole Historic HouseA New Digital Game Engaging K-6 Students with American History through American Art3/1/2021 - 2/28/2022$30,000.00ElizabethBondJacks   Thomas Cole Historic HouseCatskillNY12414-1027USA2020U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a 3D digital game based on paintings by Thomas Cole (1801–48) exploring early American history.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site (TCNHS) will address an urgent need in our society to support K-6 schoolchildren in developing an understanding of the history of the United States from multiple viewpoints so they may better understand current events and the choices that impact our future. The proposed project is the Discovery Phase in the creation of a new digital learning experience that uses American art to teach American history and support curriculum standards. The TCNHS digital game will focus on the period in American History between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War when the artist and writer Thomas Cole was active and the nation was experiencing rapid cultural change not unlike today. This project addresses the “A More Perfect Union” initiative by using artwork as an entry point to consider how the first generation of American citizens grappled with the effects of the United States constitution and related humanities themes.

MD-277096-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of Louisiana at LafayetteExploring the Cajun Roots: Augmented Reality Tour of Acadia History6/1/2021 - 12/31/2022$29,961.00Beenish Chaudhry   University of Louisiana at LafayetteLafayetteLA70503-2014USA2020Cultural HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29961028928.820

Research and development to create a prototype for an AR tour and 360-degree panoramic website of nineteenth-century Vermilionville, Lafayette, Louisiana.

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette requests an NEH Digital Projects for the Public Discovery grant in the amount of $29,961 to conduct research for developing design documents for “Indigenous, Creoles, peoples of African descent, and Acadians: Augmented Reality Tour for Vermilionville”, a transmedia project consisting of a site-specific augmented reality tour application and a 360-degree interactive web site. Augmented reality technology overlays interactive media on a live camera feed from a mobile device or an augmented reality headset, so that virtual structures and figures appear to inhabit the surrounding environment. We have assembled an interdisciplinary team of digital media and humanities faculty, and preservation institutions, to develop an engaging experiential learning application for students and visitors to a replica of an early village of Cajun and Creole heritage.

MD-277118-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsJane Austen Summer Program, Inc.Building 'Jane Austen's Desk': A Digital and Public Humanities Webspace3/1/2021 - 12/31/2021$30,000.00IngerS. B.Brodey   Jane Austen Summer Program, Inc.Chapel HillNC27514-2134USA2020British LiteratureDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of an interactive website to put Jane Austen’s life and works in historical context.

We are requesting funding to lay the groundwork for “Jane Austen’s Desk” (JAD), a public-facing website that will provide users with a window into Austen’s world and become a space for general readers and scholars around the world to explore and learn, as well as connect and collaborate. An easily accessible, attractive digital space dedicated to a widely popular author may have the best chance of reaching the widest audience and of engaging those audiences with the historical past, no longer routinely taught in high school English classes. This digital humanities project is cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary, integrating sources hosted by a variety of institutions around the world. JAD will be designed by a team of prominent Austen scholars and digital humanities experts and will simulate Jane Austen’s historical workspace circa January 1813, from a first-person perspective, in order to generate new understanding of her place in that historical moment.

MD-277132-21Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsHermann-Grima-Gallier Historic HousesShifting Landscapes: Labor and Mobility in New Orleans3/1/2021 - 6/30/2022$29,980.00Amy Medvick   Hermann-Grima-Gallier Historic HousesNew OrleansLA70156-6836USA2020African American StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs299800299800

Research and development of a panoramic 360° tour of the French Quarter’s Gallier House to relate the histories of African Americans who lived there.

The Panoramic 360° tour of Gallier Historic House will focus on telling the ignored histories of people of African descent who lived on the property, particularly as it relates to their interaction with the built environment and interstitial spaces, and the preservation efforts made to maintain the home and its features. We have gathered a team of eleven scholars from around the country to provide direction, research, and evaluation on the points of interest (POIs) featured in this virtual experience that will make this space accessible to a wider selection of the public.

MD-284714-22Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsCorporation of Gonzaga UniversityFinding Our Way: Fostering a Sense of Place for Underrepresented Communities3/1/2022 - 2/28/2023$29,329.00Katey Roden   Corporation of Gonzaga UniversitySpokaneWA99258-1774USA2021Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29329028766.070

Development of a digital platform exploring histories of people who have lived along the Children of the Sun Trail in Spokane, Washington.

Finding Our Way: Fostering a Sense of Place for Underrepresented Communities responds to construction of a highway in Spokane, WA that bisects low-income neighborhoods, severing residential areas from schools and businesses. Construction includes the “Children of the Sun Trail” pedestrian trail that parallels the highway, for residents to navigate the highway fragmenting their neighborhoods. Ethnobotanical plantings will ground stories about the role native plants have had and continue to have in the Spokane Tribe, who have been displaced from the land the trail occupies. Finding Our Way brings together community stakeholders and the Spokane Tribe to design a website for several marginalized communities to tell stories about their community culture and identity through collaborative geography, community dialogue, and place making that renders otherwise invisible communities visible via interwoven digital narratives that center the interrelations between diverse geo-cultural narratives.

MD-284742-22Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsAssociation for Cultural EquityMaking Global Jukebox Journeys Mobile: Exploring the Roots of American Music3/1/2022 - 2/28/2023$30,000.00AnnaL.Wood   Association for Cultural EquityNew YorkNY10036-6807USA2021Cultural AnthropologyDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a mobile-friendly site and new humanities content focused on three musical traditions.

Global Jukebox Journeys link songs, places and cultures with history and sociocultural change through virtual narratives designed by scholars and community experts. Through the Discovery grant, we intend to plan for a mobile-friendly version of Journeys exploring the musical roots and transformations of African American, Ashkenazi Jewish American, and Anglo-American music in historical and cultural context as initial featured content for the mobile version of the Global Jukebox website, through consultation with a team of ethnomusicology, history and digital technology consultants, culminating in the creation of a design document including narratives, technical specifications, and wireframes.

MD-284760-22Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsKansas State UniversityDiscovery Phase – The Ellis Trail to Nicodemus: Revealing Stories in the Landscape of Black Westward Settlement3/1/2022 - 10/31/2023$30,000.00LaBarbaraJamesWigfall   Kansas State UniversityManhattanKS66506-0100USA2021African American HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs30000029072.310

Development of an interactive website exploring the settlement of Nicodemus, Kansas, through the route taken by early African American settlers.

The goal of this Discovery level project is to create a detailed Design Plan for an interactive website to interpret the Ellis Trail to Nicodemus within broader humanities themes of black westward settlement in the United States.

MD-284782-22Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsLouis Armstrong House MuseumMapping the Legacy of Jazz and Hip-Hop in Queens3/1/2022 - 5/31/2023$30,000.00Regina Bain   Louis Armstrong House MuseumCoronaNY11368-1226USA2021Music History and CriticismDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of a digital project exploring the history of jazz and hip-hop in Queens, New York.

The Louis Armstrong House Museum requests a $30,000 Digital Projects for the Public Discovery Grant for the exploratory phase for Mapping Jazz and Hip-Hop in Queens, New York. The goal of the project is to raise broader awareness about one of the essential storylines in the history of American music: how the presence of a prolific jazz community in Queens had significant influence on the rise of hip-hop in the borough and beyond. We will tell this story via a multi-platform digital experience including a museum exhibit and a web/mobile interactive that facilitates users’ own journeys as they explore the neighborhoods that incubated both jazz and hip-hop over a span of nearly a century.

MD-290203-23Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsNorthwestern UniversityThe People Who Created "America's City" (New York 1770-1800)3/1/2023 - 12/31/2023$29,949.62Spencer Striker   Northwestern UniversityEvanstonIL60208-0001USA2022U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs29949.620299490

Research and consultations with scholarly and educational advisers to create a role-playing game about New York City during and after the American Revolution.

We seek to develop The People Who Created "America''s City" (New York 1770-1800)-as a special edition of the award-winning History Adventures: World of Characters digital learning series-to teach middle and high school students, as well as museum attendees, to think historically by immersing them in the world of revolutionary-era New York City. Building on History Adventures'' digital learning model, (winner of the inaugural Anthem Awards celebrating purpose-driven work), which illuminates vital aspects of world history, The People Who Created "America''s City" will offer a dynamic, immersive, and complex way for students to understand that making choices was often fraught for real people during this era of Revolutionary War. The final product will be available for free to the public on the web, iOS, Android, and Kindle Interactive; available to the public in NYC-based museums; and will pilot as part of the core curriculum in classrooms across the U.S.

MD-290223-23Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsUniversity of Rhode IslandAugmenting Manissean Public Memory, Sense of Place, and Belonging on Block Island3/1/2023 - 5/31/2024$29,953.00Amelia Moore   University of Rhode IslandKingstonRI02881-1967USA2022Interdisciplinary Studies, OtherDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs299530299530

Development of an AR walking tour and on-line map exploring the African American and Indigenous history of Block Island.

This project requests Discovery funds to support the testing of augmented reality (AR) content and technologies to enhance the public understanding and experience of African American and Indigenous life and history on Block Island, Rhode Island, also known as the island of Manisses to the region''s Indigenous peoples. This marginalized history has been almost totally erased from the island, and the small population of African American and Indigenous people that retains ties to the island is almost totally unknown. This project will build creative AR stories that re-narrate Manissean history around the island and online through a series of community co-creation workshops with Manissean family members, regional Indigenous cultural representatives, digital and visual media experts, and regional and local historians and social scientists.

MD-290292-23Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsJournal of Ecumenical StudiesDiversity in Early America Tour App3/1/2023 - 12/31/2023$30,000.00David Krueger   Journal of Ecumenical StudiesPhiladelphiaPA19121-3429USA2022U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000297000

Historical and technical research for an app-based mobile walking tour about the diverse religious traditions in colonial and Revolutionary-era Philadelphia.

The Dialogue Institute is requesting a $30,000 Digital Projects for the Humanities Discovery grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the research phase of the “Diversity in Early America Tour App” that will guide visitors through uniquely historic religious and cultural sites that are connected to Independence National Historical Park and the broader historic district in Philadelphia. The completed app will be available for download onto a user’s phone or other mobile device. The content will tell the story of the unique religious diversity found in Philadelphia during the colonial and Revolutionary eras and how it is tied together with the more famous sites of early American history found in and around the park. The project aims to promote the virtues of religiously-diverse democracies and use history to stimulate dialogue about the challenges of majority-minority relations, racial justice, and the rise of Christian nationalism in the contemporary U.S.

MD-296218-24Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsNew America FoundationThe Library Sit-In of 1939: An Immersive Learning Space2/1/2024 - 12/31/2024$30,000.00Lisa Guernsey   New America FoundationWashingtonDC20005-1031USA2023African American HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000298250

An online exhibition exploring the 1939 civil rights protest by five African American men against the segregated policies of the public library in Alexandria, Virginia.

The Library Sit-In of 1939: An Immersive Learning Space is envisioned to be an online public learning space that tells the story of five young Black men who were arrested for peacefully protesting for their right to use Alexandria, Virginia’s, Whites-only public library in 1939. Scholars say this sit-in is the first recorded civil rights protest in the United States to take place in a public library, yet the event is little known outside of small circles of library historians and city residents. The project’s goal is to widen awareness of this historic event and the Jim Crow laws that sparked it. The project aims to situate the Library Sit-In within two key movements of the early-to-mid 20th-century: 1) recognizing the efforts by Black lawyers and activists to overturn racist policies and 2) highlighting a budding American education system, as communities of all racial identities aspired to develop public places for learning by opening libraries and expanding schools.

MD-296252-24Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsMiami Dade College North CampusGoing Overtown Digital Project for Miami2/1/2024 - 1/31/2025$30,000.00JoseRafaelVazquez   Miami Dade College North CampusMiamiFL33167-3418USA2023African American StudiesDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Planning an immersive virtual reality experience and a website examining the history of vanished African American neighborhoods of Miami. 

"Going Overtown" is a digital humanities project to engage the public with the African American cultural landscapes of South Florida through a virtual reality experience and a multi-modal digital application. The project will focus on historic neighborhoods affected by segregation and gentrification in Miami since the late 1800s.

MD-296298-24Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsNaper SettlementTall Grass Prairie to Technoburb: Digital Exhibition Experience2/1/2024 - 11/30/2024$30,000.00Jeanne Schultz Angel   Naper SettlementNapervilleIL60540-6517USA2023Public HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs300000300000

Development of digital formats and humanities content for an immersive visitor experience on the history of Naperville, Illinois. 

Naperville Heritage Society (NHS) seeks a discovery award of $30,000 to enable our team, in partnership with humanities scholars and leading digital media production and interactive experience design partners, to identify and storyboard the exhibit experience best suited to engage visitors in the history of Naperville’s transformation from Indigenous land to a small farm community to the science and technology industries that defined the 21st century city. Re-telling Naperville’s origin stories allows for a wider view of history, sparking questions and conversations about America, exemplifying NEH’s American Tapestry initiative “to tell our country’s history in all its complexity and diversity.” The digital exhibit experience will let visitors navigate between centuries of history to be inspired by the diverse stories of the people who migrated to this place over time.

MD-296310-24Public Programs: Digital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsHistoric Hudson ValleySeen and Heard: Women's Stories of Enslavement and Resistance at Van Cortlandt Manor2/1/2024 - 1/31/2025$29,700.00ElizabethL.Bradley   Historic Hudson ValleyPocantico HillsNY10591-1203USA2023U.S. HistoryDigital Projects for the Public: Discovery GrantsPublic Programs297000296800

Development of an immersive, digital experience examining the story of five enslaved women at Van Cortlandt estate and their quest for freedom.  

Historic Hudson Valley (HHV) seeks funding to support the exploratory stages of an immersive digital multimedia project that invites visitors into a specific place and time – New York’s Van Cortlandt Manor during the Revolutionary War – and introduces them to Bridget and Jin, two enslaved women who planned to use the chaos of wartime as an opportunity to self-liberate to British lines. Their story, which is grounded in primary documents from HHV’s archives, will serve as the jumping-off point for an exploration of domestic enslavement and resistance at Van Cortlandt Manor from the American Revolution through gradual emancipation acts to the legal abolition of slavery in New York in 1827, using the interior spaces of the manor as its design framework. Through the individual stories of enslaved women, HHV will call attention to the drawn-out process of gradual emancipation in the North and contribute to a greater public understanding of the complicated history of slavery in America.